What's In A Name Badge? What's In A Name Badge? | allnurses

What's In A Name Badge?

  1. 5 Hi All! (I can feel the flames already)

    This is sort of a vent post and my curiosity on all of you wonderful ladies and gentlemen's take on the subject...NOT AN ADN vs BSN bullcrap argument, so please NONE of that.

    I have my BSN. I went to a 4 year program. When I got my first job 3 years ago the hospital automatically put RN-BSN on my name badge. Never did I catch so much cattiness and people assuming I felt "superior." NOT THE CASE AT ALL. I didn't even ask for it to be on my badge. I had one LPN who constantly made snide comments "BSN my a**, she knows nothing." New grads were supposed to know it all I guess?? *eye roll*

    FAST FORWARD to the present. I accepted a new job at another hospital. HR asked what I wanted on my badge. I told them "please just put RN. I don't want BSN." I just want to avoid anyone thinking that I have some chip on my shoulder. I do not want to come off snobbish. I am not saying those who want BSN on their badge are snobbish but in my experience this is how it's perceived. I do not feel I am any better than an ADN prepared nurse. They are wonderful!!

    What is everyone's take on this? Anyone been in a similar situation?
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  2. 108 Comments

  3. Visit  Here.I.Stand profile page
    #1 13
    My thoughts are I have soooooo many bigger fish to fry. Where I work lots of people have the "BSN" or "BAN" (several liberal arts schools here) on their badges. I didn't bother adding it to mine when I completed my degree, mainly because I have better things to do than trek all the way to the security office to get a new one. And of course, being no more prepared for critical care nursing than before I had my BSN.
  4. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    #2 1
    I understand your logic. Just curious - is the new position a promotion?

    I mean, I can understand those with grad degrees are often in upper mgt, clinical or educ positions whereby their creds are an expectation of the E&E requirements for the position. So on a badge they would not be out of place.

    I've personally bought some ID name badge/bars. Depending on the position, I might or might NOT put the BSN and a cert. Work badges were whatever they gave me.

    If I felt like you, I'd leave them off too. On occ, I would sometimes sign my BSN in my nsg notes - just looked funny & too fancy schmancy. Didn't do it too often except for official correspondence and documents.
  5. Visit  heinz57 profile page
    #3 25
    Don't ever let anyone make you feel ashamed or embarrassed to have an education and especially the BSN. The "have nots" who are making the snide remarks are the ones with the problem. Don't let their insecurities make you feel less proud of your accomplishment.

    Around my city not having BSN on your badge would be very unusual. Snobs? No. Just professionals accepting the changing times and not holding onto the 1970s.
  6. Visit  Sour Lemon profile page
    #4 9
    Quote from TruvyNurse
    Hi All! (I can feel the flames already)

    This is sort of a vent post and my curiosity on all of you wonderful ladies and gentlemen's take on the subject...NOT AN ADN vs BSN bullcrap argument, so please NONE of that.

    I have my BSN. I went to a 4 year program. When I got my first job 3 years ago the hospital automatically put RN-BSN on my name badge. Never did I catch so much cattiness and people assuming I felt "superior." NOT THE CASE AT ALL. I didn't even ask for it to be on my badge. I had one LPN who constantly made snide comments "BSN my a**, she knows nothing." New grads were supposed to know it all I guess?? *eye roll*

    FAST FORWARD to the present. I accepted a new job at another hospital. HR asked what I wanted on my badge. I told them "please just put RN. I don't want BSN." I just want to avoid anyone thinking that I have some chip on my shoulder. I do not want to come off snobbish. I am not saying those who want BSN on their badge are snobbish but in my experience this is how it's perceived. I do not feel I am any better than an ADN prepared nurse. They are wonderful!!

    What is everyone's take on this? Anyone been in a similar situation?
    It doesn't matter what you have on your badge. If you're a new (or inexperienced) nurse, people are going to test you and make comments about your perceived incapability. Some experienced nurses do the same thing to new doctors. It's a chance to feel superior for five minutes. Let them enjoy it.
  7. Visit  ponymom profile page
    #5 11
    I would have called the pig out on it.

    "Lol, I'm sorry what did you actually mean by BSN my *ss? I had both the time and the money, so I just figured I'd go for it, and whatcha know, I did it!!! Yay me!"

    Said all sweetly and with extra points given if you happen to be answering someone else's call light, and/or toileting a patient at the time, where other staff or management see you doing that.
  8. Visit  emmy27 profile page
    #6 61
    As far as I can tell, ninety percent of people don't look at badges closely enough to have any idea what's on them at all, so I could put "RN, BSN, High Queen of Narnia" on there and patients would still be confusing me with the dietary aide they reported their pain to ten minutes ago.
  9. Visit  blondy2061h profile page
    #7 9
    My facility charges $25 for a new ID badge unless your credentials change. I eventually had to have my badge updated to say MSN just to finagle a new one for free when mine was falling apart. I felt a little pompous walking around with my new tag at first.
  10. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #8 23
    Quote from TruvyNurse
    I had one LPN who constantly made snide comments "BSN my a**, she knows nothing." New grads were supposed to know it all I guess??
    The LPN's negative comments may have been a reflection of her personal resentments. During my years as an LPN, I never made catty comments to my RN counterparts because I felt secure in my role.

    Anyhow, I worked with an insecure LPN for 5+ years. She would always comment on how "stupid" some of the RNs were. She would also portray herself as a super-nurse. This particular LPN feverishly wanted to earn her RN license, but could not return to school due to defaulted student loans and financial issues.

    In all likelihood it made her feel temporarily better to insult other nurses and elevate her own abilities rather than focus on her own nursing practice and/or address the issues in her personal life.
  11. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    #9 19
    My facility recently required everyone to get a new badge due to a logo change. The only credentials printed on them are licensure or job description. No more degree level or certifications allowed. Personally, I worked darn hard for my degrees and my certification and would prefer to have them on the badge- it's the only recognition I got from it. Maybe patients don't know what they mean, but I do.
  12. Visit  DeeAngel profile page
    #10 2
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    My facility recently required everyone to get a new badge due to a logo change. The only credentials printed on them are licensure or job description. No more degree level or certifications allowed. Personally, I worked darn hard for my degrees and my certification and would prefer to have them on the badge- it's the only recognition I got from it. Maybe patients don't know what they mean, but I do.

    Then wear a personal name tag, in addition to the work badge and have it read as you like.
  13. Visit  TruvyNurse profile page
    #11 2
    Quote from amoLucia
    I understand your logic. Just curious - is the new position a promotion?

    .
    Not a promotion. Just going to a different hospital.
  14. Visit  TruvyNurse profile page
    #12 6
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The LPN's negative comments may have been a reflection of her personal resentments. During my years as an LPN, I never made catty comments to my RN counterparts because I felt secure in my role.

    Anyhow, I worked with an insecure LPN for 5+ years. She would always comment on how "stupid" some of the RNs were. She would also portray herself as a super-nurse. This particular LPN feverishly wanted to earn her RN license, but could not return to school due to defaulted student loans and financial issues.

    In all likelihood it made her feel temporarily better to insult other nurses and elevate her own abilities rather than focus on her own nursing practice and/or address the issues in her personal life.
    Yes you are right. At first it did bug me as a new nurse but my skin got thicker over the years and I shrugged it off. I just wanted to avoid the same BS at a new facility. Ya know?

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