What is it with nurses and cell phones? Just a vent. - page 9

by fakebee

33,291 Views | 289 Comments

Recently my hospital has upgraded or introduced multiple new computer programs that have required almost every level of nurse from bedside to administration to attend class in order to use the new technology. I have assisted in... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from Nascar nurse
    My daughter is 18 so when she was an infant we did not have cell phones yet. I thought I would lose my mind with worry when I left my VERY non-domesticated spouse home alone with the baby for the first time. This was the man I had to teach how to even hold her the day she was born because he held her out like a bowl of popcorn. Luckily I lived close enough to run home at lunch and check on them. Found a group of very non-domesticated young guys (his long time buddies) and of course him all sitting on the floor goo-gahing over this little baby that hubby had all dressed up like a little princess.

    My best advice to all of you newer Mothers - put the phone down and let them figure out how to deal with things. They WILL figure it out, they will be better Fathers for figuring it out and your children will have the security of knowing they have 2 parents.

    And my last $0.02...I'm just so dang glad I didn't have a cell phone growing up. I could hide out for hours at a time with no one knowing exactly where I was or having any way to reach me.
    Really good advice about dads. Sometimes we moms complain our spouses don't help and then when they do, we criticize the hell out of them.

    We have no internet access on our phones by the way and YES, I 'd love to be out of cell service sometimes.
    merd01, Ruby Vee, and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  2. 10
    Quote from kconnor126
    Unfortunately I don't live in a perfect world and circumstances arise. My husband isn't what you would call "domesticated" but I have no other alternative.
    Nor do I live in a perfect world. My husband died when the kids were 6,9 and 12. They knew how to call the desk and ask for me, I did not carry the cell phone at work. And they never called to ask about cookies or going to the park, etc. When I had a moment between patients, I would call to say good night, but if I didn't have time they understood and didn't panic.

    They are now all either in college or graduated, having survived my obviously horrible parenting aeb not being instantly in contact every single minute. We are close and continue to enjoy each other's company.
    merd01, rn/writer, kaliRN, and 7 others like this.
  3. 5
    Quote from AngelfireRN
    As an NP, my phone stays in my pocket at all times. I have it for the calculation of dosage, for my drug software app, in case another provider needs to reach me, for contact with whomever has my son that day, and most of all, to show pics of my son to patients who consider me family.
    I will walk out if I go in and find them on the phone. I'll go on to my next patient, and see the other when they're off the phone. Point being, they GET seen.
    I agree with what's been said before about some of these over-the-top responses. So extra. It's a phone. It's a fact of life. It's not going away. Deal.
    So funny . .. .I've never heard "so extra". And now I've seen it twice on one thread.

    I think if it bothers the instructor so much maybe the folks who don't think it is a big deal might just be a bit more considerate and "deal" themselves. Cell phones aren't going away but folks could be nicer about it.
    merd01, kaliRN, nightnurse28, and 2 others like this.
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    I generally try to be polite and inoffensive. However, I resent having my time wasted, and when I'm forced to go to useless mandatory trainings that last hours upon hours (e.g. three hours of, "this is how you use a mouse"), which nursing/hospitals just LOVE to do... my iPhone comes out of my pocket and gets 90% of my attention.

    It's either that or the sound of me constantly flipping the pages in the newspaper. Your pick.
    ChristineN, mshessle, JZ_RN, and 1 other like this.
  5. 5
    Quote from apocatastasis
    I generally try to be polite and inoffensive. However, I resent having my time wasted, and when I'm forced to go to useless mandatory trainings that last hours upon hours (e.g. three hours of, "this is how you use a mouse"), which nursing/hospitals just LOVE to do... my iPhone comes out of my pocket and gets 90% of my attention.

    It's either that or the sound of me constantly flipping the pages in the newspaper. Your pick.
    How about being polite to the trainers? How hard is that?
    SionainnRN, merd01, Szasz_is_Right, and 2 others like this.
  6. 10
    Computer training at hospitals needs to be divided up by computer ability level. I've sat through 3 hour classes that you could have given me a tip card and I'd be good to go. And in that class is someone that needs a 6 hour class.
    I know personally, I'm more polite when nobody is being impolite to me by wasting my time.
    alibee, nightnurse28, Hygiene Queen, and 7 others like this.
  7. 1
    Quote from wooh
    Computer training at hospitals needs to be divided up by computer ability level. I've sat through 3 hour classes that you could have given me a tip card and I'd be good to go. And in that class is someone that needs a 6 hour class.
    I know personally, I'm more polite when nobody is being impolite to me by wasting my time.
    Wouldn't that be great? I wish they could do things that way. My problem is, being rude to our coworkers who are just doing what is dictated by management doesn't do anyone any good. They're just following orders.
    kaliRN likes this.
  8. 3
    Our unit allows cell phones in pockets, if your not checking them or answering them at the bedside. We have a lounge for cell phone conversation. By the time your a working RN you should have the time management skills to allow for a 5 second review of any texts for.emergency, if you don't, your too busy to be concerned with phones and need to be doing your job. Which is patient care and NOT texting. I would hope every mother would leave her actual work number with hubby or sitter, not just a cell. I would hope your coworkers would not delay an emergent message from home. It comes down to professionalism. If you cannot manage you family affairs in a manner that keeps you off your cell phone while with a patient, I would be concerned about your other professional/organizational/time management decisions. I'm very lucky the staff I work with, doesn't need a policy to tell them how to be professional nurses.
    merd01, JBudd, and Ruby Vee like this.
  9. 8
    So if I'm interpreting the replies correctly it's about an even split between the turn off the phone and at least fake paying attention out of politeness people and the cell phones are here deal with it people. It is very interesting to see just how polarizing this small issue is. My vote for most interesting comment is the one where the poster says if I feel you're wasting my time I'll whip out my phone or newspaper and show you I have something more important to do. As a former middle manager I thought, as the majority of nurse managers I currently know often say, that the majority of meetings with upper management were a waste of time. Yet I could never imagine pulling out my phone or newspaper to demonstrate this, I don't think they would appreciate it.
    SionainnRN, merd01, kaliRN, and 5 others like this.
  10. 5
    Quote from cienurse
    Times are so different than when we were our kids' age.........years ago we walked everywhere and there were pay phones EVERYWHERE so that when we did something silly or needed our parents, we had a way to be in touch......I hope you never live long enough to regret being "No nonsense parents." There are so many crazies and dangerous situations out there that I would want my kids to be able to reach me IMMEDIATELY, whether its a call or a text message! A trak phone is cheap and unreliable. Texting is an add-on which YOU must have allowed when you gave him the other phone so what is a teenager supposed to do? Other than that, I can only imagine that you could hold your child hostage until he is old enough to move away from home and get his own phone service. Hopefully, he'll still want to be calling or texting you by then.
    Perhaps I'm just cranky today, but this struck me as a particularly mean-spirited message. It must be nice to have all the answers and be able to criticize others' parenting decisions. But how NOT nice you are to intimate that if others don't follow YOUR parenting ideal, crazies will injure their children AND their children won't want to be in touch with their parents when they're grown. Shaking head.
    merd01, kaliRN, morte, and 2 others like this.


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