What is it with nurses and cell phones? Just a vent. - page 26

by fakebee 35,351 Views | 289 Comments

Recently my hospital has upgraded or introduced multiple new computer programs that have required almost every level of nurse from bedside to administration to attend class in order to use the new technology. I have assisted in... Read More


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    I'm in my last year of nursing school and we've always been aloud to use our phones in clinical as a clinical tool or reference. I am so thankful we can. If it is obvious that we aren't using are phones APPROPIATELY, then we will be told to put it up or receive a clinical infraction. We cannot talk on our phones, and our instructors use their phones as tools during clinical or to text instructors in other floor or back at school. My instructors aren't extremely young either, 3 out of 5 are over 52, all of them are over 32 (which is still pretty young) . These are people who have been in nursing 10, 20, and 30 years.

    In our informatics lecture we learned that nurses should taking advantage of the technology around them.

    I need my phone for various reason it is very helpful to me. I see nothing wrong with an employer, who may have a minute or 2 to spare, sending a message. I agree that this should not take place at the desk or during conversations with people.

    On night shift, I feel just checking your phone for the time or a message is ok, even at the desk. You've got to use common sense when it comes to technology, don't let it be your downfall or cause people to lack your professionalism.
  2. 0
    Actually texting is very beneficial. I work PRN at a local hospital and we implemented blackberry text and email orders from the hospitalists. I think it is perversely ignorant for one to make a judgement on someone who may text at various times. If the time or location when an individual texts doesn't jeopardize patient care, safety, and privacy and the credibility of the organization, what's the big deal.

    I agree that some can go overboard. However, I think an honest self-evaluation is necessary when this "issue" comes up. ANA code of Ethics provision 5.2 says

    "Continual professional growth, particularly in knowledge and skill, requires a commitment to lifelong learning. Such learning includes, but is not limited to, continuing education, networking with professional colleagues, self-study, professional reading, certification, and seeking advanced degrees. Nurses are required to have knowledge relevant to the current scope and standards of nursing practice, changing issues, concerns, controversies, and ethics"

    So being open to the fact that the works if nursing and the world I general are constantly changing, we MUST adapt eventually. When creatures and humans don't adapt and learn tolerance they become obsolete. Now this doesn't mean that everyone has to text everywhere and everything, but it means things are changing and no matter how bad we try to resist that change will effect us.

    We are at a heightened time of communication and information! We are also in a time where everyday the world become a little less safer place to live ( I totally understand why people want to constantly check on their kids even if it seems too much).

    In conclusion, technology MUST be kept in its place, but we must also true with it. Also, if it is not effecting patient care and I'm not paying the bill, what can I do, but report it to the appropriate officials and continue to strive to do my best and uphold my profession? There are too many people that need to be taking care if because someone is offended or irritated by a co-worker or whatever being in a cell phone. If they are putting patients or the profession in harms way, do what you can, but then move on.
  3. 0
    Quick reminder from the admin/moderator team, several posts have been removed as they were off topic, divisive and argumentative.

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  4. 2
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    Actually texting is very beneficial. I work PRN at a local hospital and we implemented blackberry text and email orders from the hospitalists. I think it is perversely ignorant for one to make a judgement on someone who may text at various times. If the time or location when an individual texts doesn't jeopardize patient care, safety, and privacy and the credibility of the organization, what's the big deal.

    I agree that some can go overboard. However, I think an honest self-evaluation is necessary when this "issue" comes up. ANA code of Ethics provision 5.2 says

    "Continual professional growth, particularly in knowledge and skill, requires a commitment to lifelong learning. Such learning includes, but is not limited to, continuing education, networking with professional colleagues, self-study, professional reading, certification, and seeking advanced degrees. Nurses are required to have knowledge relevant to the current scope and standards of nursing practice, changing issues, concerns, controversies, and ethics"

    So being open to the fact that the works if nursing and the world I general are constantly changing, we MUST adapt eventually. When creatures and humans don't adapt and learn tolerance they become obsolete. Now this doesn't mean that everyone has to text everywhere and everything, but it means things are changing and no matter how bad we try to resist that change will effect us.

    We are at a heightened time of communication and information! We are also in a time where everyday the world become a little less safer place to live ( I totally understand why people want to constantly check on their kids even if it seems too much).

    In conclusion, technology MUST be kept in its place, but we must also true with it. Also, if it is not effecting patient care and I'm not paying the bill, what can I do, but report it to the appropriate officials and continue to strive to do my best and uphold my profession? There are too many people that need to be taking care if because someone is offended or irritated by a co-worker or whatever being in a cell phone. If they are putting patients or the profession in harms way, do what you can, but then move on.
    The same analysis can be applied to those who write complaining about "cell phones and nurses". Let us assume that someone starting a thread on this board about this topic is not talking about the legitimate uses you described, or that their objections could somehow be extrapolated to an aversion to keeping one's education current.
    morte and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    The same analysis can be applied to those who write complaining about "cell phones and nurses". Let us assume that someone starting a thread on this board about this topic is not talking about the legitimate uses you described, or that their objections could somehow be extrapolated to an aversion to keeping one's education current.
    I don't like assuming, it can get people killed, I intentionally generalize my comments to cover an array possibilities.this issue can very much be considered an "aversion to keeping ones education current". The OP asked "what was up with nurses and cell phones?" The truth is people, in general, can use technology inappropriately or appropriately. So, generally speaking, nurses can do the same thing. W have no idea why an individual may utilize there phone for various reasons. We are there to ensure excellent care is provided to patient, not to be cell phone monitors (although I think the OP was simply highlighting an observation not just fussing). If care is compromised then the individual using the phone obviously has their priorities mixed up.

    I ask nurse l56 who is to say where the legitimate uses, outside of work related communication, stops? If the person is texting there child who is away to check on them, I find that a legitament use. If a nurse, who rarely gets to sit and have a full conversation, texts an answer in response to a relative in need, I find it the legit. We may see people on the phone texting a lot, but we may not know why. All I'm saying is that let's NOT ASSUME that they are simply wasting time and ignoring the needs if Pt's (unless its clear that they are with call lights continually going off unanswered). Don't jump to conclusions. It could be that they are texting a lived one in the military over seas, idk. Open-mindedness and being EDUCATED and informed that convenient communication styles, such as texting, are sometimes the way working people who have lives outside if work can stay connected in case anything happens or be informed of new knowledge that could benefit them.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on Nov 4, '12
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    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    I don't like assuming, it can get people killed,
    You assumed that some of the nurses in this thread object to the legitimate or hospital-sponsored uses of cell phone technology even though not one of them said so and many people made the point directly. You then assigned a pejorative description of "perversely ignorant" to this conjectural group, and added two more assumptions - 1. that such an objection warranted your pasting a section of the ANA Code of Ethics into your post, because you assumed those perversely ignorant people must also not be keeping their education current and 2. that their actions represent a nurse who refuses to adapt, is closed-minded and puts his or her patients at risk by using obsolete information.

    I would say, PatMacSN your assumptions are much more insulting and far-reaching than any of the responses I've seen on this thread. I didn't see anyone saying cell phone abusers are ignorant, unethical or willfully uneducated as part of their generalized array of possibilities.

    Open-mindedness and being EDUCATED and informed that convenient communication styles, such as texting, are sometimes the way working people who have lives outside if work can stay connected in case anything happens or be informed of new knowledge that could benefit them.
    All working people have lives outside of work. The number of times there is a true emergency or need for an extended back and forth texting conversation while you are on the clock is very small, making inappropriate use at least as obvious to co-workers as it is to the faculty at your school. And new knowledge is a very beneficial. wonderful thing. It doesn't generally rise to the level of a time-sensitive alert while you are being paid to do a job where the new knowledge isn't something you need to know to do it.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Nov 5, '12
  7. 3
    Quote from PatMac10,SN

    I ask nurse l56 who is to say where the legitimate uses, outside of work related communication, stops? If the person is texting there child who is away to check on them, I find that a legitament use. If a nurse, who rarely gets to sit and have a full conversation, texts an answer in response to a relative in need, I find it the legit. We may see people on the phone texting a lot, but we may not know why. All I'm saying is that let's NOT ASSUME that they are simply wasting time and ignoring the needs if Pt's (unless its clear that they are with call lights continually going off unanswered). Don't jump to conclusions. It could be that they are texting a lived one in the military over seas, idk. Open-mindedness and being EDUCATED and informed that convenient communication styles, such as texting, are sometimes the way working people who have lives outside if work can stay connected in case anything happens or be informed of new knowledge that could benefit them.
    None of the three listed above are legitament use of cell, WHILE ON THE CLOCK, period.
  8. 4
    We may see people on the phone texting a lot, but we may not know why. All I'm saying is that let's NOT ASSUME that they are simply wasting time and ignoring the needs if Pt's (unless its clear that they are with call lights continually going off unanswered). Don't jump to conclusions.
    Common sense says it's a matter of frequency. If someone is texting a lot, I'd be an idiot to think that it was all an emergent matter that must be attended to at that moment. It's not jumping to conclusions; it's having at least half a brain.
    Conqueror+, merd01, redhead_NURSE98!, and 1 other like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from nursel56

    You assumed that some of the nurses in this thread object to the legitimate or hospital-sponsored uses of cell phone technology even though not one of them said so and many people made the point directly. You then assigned a pejorative description of "perversely ignorant" to this conjectural group, and added two more assumptions - 1. that such an objection warranted your pasting a section of the ANA Code of Ethics into your post, because you assumed those perversely ignorant people must also not be keeping their education current and 2. that their actions represent a nurse who refuses to adapt, is closed-minded and puts his or her patients at risk by using obsolete information.

    I would say, PatMacSN your assumptions are much more insulting and far-reaching than any of the responses I've seen on this thread. I didn't see anyone saying cell phone abusers are ignorant, unethical or willfully uneducated as part of their generalized array of possibilities.

    All working people have lives outside of work. The number of times there is a true emergency or need for an extended back and forth texting conversation while you are on the clock is very small, making inappropriate use at least as obvious to co-workers as it is to the faculty at your school. And new knowledge is a very beneficial. wonderful thing. It doesn't generally rise to the level of a time-sensitive alert while you are being paid to do a job where the new knowledge isn't something you need to know to do it.
    NurseI56 I will make the suggestion that you review all if the comments, as people were called ignorant, which was part if the reason the board Administrators had to become involved. Secondly, I realize you are attempting to "inflame" my response.

    I can respect your opinion, civilly. Although I don't agree with all of your statements.
  10. 2
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    NurseI56 I will make the suggestion that you review all if the comments, as people were called ignorant, which was part if the reason the board Administrators had to become involved. Secondly, I realize you are attempting to "inflame" my response.

    I can respect your opinion, civilly. Although I don't agree with all of your statements.
    Yes there were some side conversations that got too heated and personal. I'm sorry though -- I can't bear the thought of reading through all 200 posts again, though I'm sure there are some real gems in there. The only thing I did with your response was to point out some areas I felt you made some unfair judgements. I think we can end this on a mutually respectful and civil note, PatMac best wishes as you continue your studies.
    Altra and redhead_NURSE98! like this.


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