unprofessional behavior in RN community - page 3

by miphillli 16,870 Views | 107 Comments

:nurse: I work in a small rural hospital in Nebraska,you would think the nurses here would be as professional as anywhere,or more so,wrong-wrong-wrong...we have some younger 22-30 year olds that use the f word and others I don't... Read More


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    yeah I find it offensive too, even on my breaks. The F word is just an offensive word to me, and I think its disrespectful to use it in front of your co-workers or others that arent used to people just throwing it around without thinking about how nasty it sounds. It definately isn't lady-like, and unprofessional in my opinion.
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    Quote from LPN4Life
    yeah I find it offensive too, even on my breaks. The F word is just an offensive word to me, and I think its disrespectful to use it in front of your co-workers or others that arent used to people just throwing it around without thinking about how nasty it sounds. It definately isn't lady-like, and unprofessional in my opinion.
    I wonder if they would talk that way in front of their parents. I am 33 next month and if I cursed in front of my dad he would still try to wash my mouth out with soap. :uhoh21: Hate to sound sexist but there are some words that should not come out of a lady's mouth. Still not acceptable for a man to be cursing at work either or in front of the ladies. Gosh am I old-fashioned or what? It wasn't until after I married did I find out my dad ever cursed. And that is only because my husband told me.
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    I am 22 and I am only a CNA. I am in school to be a nurse. I have noticed that nearly everyone that I work with either swears, doesn't care about their appearance or has an all-around bad attitude.

    There is a nurse on a floor that I regularly float to. She has to be 60+ years old. Let me give you -1- example of the way she conducts herself. I'll call her "M".

    I was going on my lunch break and I saw a patient dressed up and ready to go at the elevator. I asked him if he had been discharged and why no one was escorting him downstairs. He told me that he was leaving AMA and "forget this crap, I'm outta here." I ran back to M's floor and said, "M, one of your patients is getting ready to get on the elevator and he's leaving AMA without signing anything!" M didn't even look up from her paperwork and said "I don't give a flying f--- what he does. He has been a pain in my a-- during his entire stay. I don't care, let him go." I was dumbfounded... I went and told her nurse manager and she told me she'd take care of it. Other situations where M gets into verbal arguments with patients who are confused have happened, too. I have told MY nurse manager that these things happen when M floats to our floor. My nurse manager says that M is of a different species. No one ever says anything to her. I don't know if it's because she's so old or what, but it makes me so mad. I have to go around apologizing to patients on the behalf of the hospital because she made them angry.

    In short, it's not only young nurses...
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    You folks that comment about certain words being inappropriate for a lady to say - do you really think that its appropriate for a man to say??

    I don't think they sound any better coming from men, nor do I think it is more acceptable for men to use them, so it just struck me as odd that people singled ladies out. Profanity is profanity - the gender of the speaker does not change a thing about the words.
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    Quote from RN4NICU
    You folks that comment about certain words being inappropriate for a lady to say - do you really think that its appropriate for a man to say??

    I don't think they sound any better coming from men, nor do I think it is more acceptable for men to use them, so it just struck me as odd that people singled ladies out. Profanity is profanity - the gender of the speaker does not change a thing about the words.
    I think it should not be used by anyone at work. But if it is just a room full of men outside work, I am pretty sure there is some cursing going on. Completely politically incorrect but yes it does sound worse coming from a woman. I believe in equal rights for women and that we can do the same job. But I am not a man and still enjoy having my door opened and shown courtesies that are given to women. That includes me not cursing and men not cursing infront of women. I for one like being treated like a lady and that means that there is a distinction between what sounds okay for a woman to say and a man. But cursing is never appropriate at work.
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    Quote from zacarias
    I imagine this nurse looking at a blood gas report and deciphering the pH, PCO2, and HCO3. That takes skill, yet she uses the word "sh***" which almost negates all her intelligence that she displayed deciphering the blood gas.
    EXACTLY!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    I have to agree with you here, I don't appreciate it when either gender starts cussing at work. Although, come to think of it, this really isn't a problem where I work. Can't say I've had to deal with this issue a lot, if at all.
    Now gossipping and cliques, well, that's another story....you're gonna have that wherever you are. And it doesn't matter if it's men or women. There are groups, cliques, etc, everywhere! Not just nursing.
    I don't like the singling out of "ladies" and inferring that we (women) should behave better....


    Quote from RN4NICU
    You folks that comment about certain words being inappropriate for a lady to say - do you really think that its appropriate for a man to say??

    I don't think they sound any better coming from men, nor do I think it is more acceptable for men to use them, so it just struck me as odd that people singled ladies out. Profanity is profanity - the gender of the speaker does not change a thing about the words.
  8. 0
    I am a social worker (M.S.W.) and current nursing student. In my 12 years of working in the health care industry and working side by side with nurses, I have never witnessed nurses using foul language or engaging in such unprofessional behavior regarding patients. What I have witnessed unfortunately is a high rate of unprofessionalism (downright meanness) towards each other. I can't tell you how many times I've observed nurses talking bad about each other. All this does is create a negative workplace atmosphere and low morale.

    I have never been treated poorly or with disrespect by a fellow social worker, however, my experiences with nurses have varied from outstanding to awful. I do believe that there is much truth to the saying that "nurses are the only professionals who eat their young!"

    Health care is a very high stress profession and much of this stress could at least be alleviated if we were more kind to one another. Workplace negativity can ruin a job.
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    Cursing should never occur in front of a patient. Personally when I am frustrated, angry or just downright disgusted with behavior of my fellow nurses I will resort to potty mouthy mode, but only in the confines of my office and only in front of those who are not offended by my words. I am not so concerned with the words a nurse uses in the nurses station as long as it is away from patients or family. I am more concerned with the care and compassion she shows her patients and coworkers. I have had potty mouth for a long time so I am not offended by curse words unless they are directed at me. Like others have said here, it's a way to blow off steam and relieve stress, and sometimes there are just not other words that are as expressive.
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    All you can change is your own behavior/response. If it bothers you, tell them that it does. It can be tough, and you might have to just know that you are going to be part of the topic of conversation in the breakroom if you don't handle how you confront the behavior in a professional manner. Act professionally yourself, model professional behavior, and don't let them get you down. Talk with your manager if it's out of control. Look at when/where it's happening - in the breakroom, venting about their assignments? In emergency situations where the way a person is used to dealing with stress shows its true colors? Or in front of patients and families? I agree, this behavior is not professional and doesn't put nursing in a very good light. But again, just look at your own behavior and be a consistently professional, excellent nurse. Get another job if it gets you down so much that you start to hate it there.


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