Quitting without a notice

  1. I'm looking for some advice on this.

    I currently have an interview coming up and if I feel like the place is the right fit for me and they offer me the job, I will take it in a heartbeat.

    I haven't given my 2 week notice to my current employer yet. I'm waiting until I have something lined up before doing so. I don't think I can last another 2 weeks at my current place of employment. Staffing issues are a problem everywhere but I have been placed in unsafe situations where I am taking care of very high acuity patients that is putting my license in jeopardy. There a bunch of other reasons as well but that is the number one reason why I want to quit without notice.

    So would you quit in my situation? Have you ever quit without a notice? I know they say to never burn your bridges but I highly doubt I will be working for this company ever again.

    Thanks!
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  2. 88 Comments

  3. by   ~PedsRN~
    It's always good to leave the bridge unburned. You may need a reference later... you know? Never say never. I would definitely give a two week notice. It's just... the right thing to do.

    Also - don't forget what a bind you'll not only be leaving management in, but your teammates as well.

    We had someone quit with no notice, and it put a serious kink in our scheduling for at least a month.
    Last edit by ~PedsRN~ on Oct 18, '15 : Reason: Added stuff.
  4. by   Farawyn
    I wouldn't. Many jobs require a weigh in from your last manager.
    It's 2 weeks. Suck it up.
    Good luck in your new job!
  5. by   springchick1
    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    I'm looking for some advice on this.

    I currently have an interview coming up and if I feel like the place is the right fit for me and they offer me the job, I will take it in a heartbeat.

    I haven't given my 2 week notice to my current employer yet. I'm waiting until I have something lined up before doing so. I don't think I can last another 2 weeks at my current place of employment. Staffing issues are a problem everywhere but I have been placed in unsafe situations where I am taking care of very high acuity patients that is putting my license in jeopardy. There a bunch of other reasons as well but that is the number one reason why I want to quit without notice.

    So would you quit in my situation? Have you ever quit without a notice? I know they say to never burn your bridges but I highly doubt I will be working for this company ever again.

    Thanks!
    Two weeks is nothing! If you get the job, work out a notice and be glad it isn't 30 days like a lot of places.
  6. by   WKShadowRN
    I second, (third, fourth) what PPs have said. Plus, the medical community is a small one. You never know when you will run across those people again. I know a woman who burned three bridges in this region and she could not get hired anywhere else. Management and peers from each place just happened to be at the new place years later and she was shot down quick.

    You can handle two more weeks if you've made it this far. Good luck!
  7. by   OCNRN63
    Off topic here, but I almost used the OP's screen name a while back when I started my blog.
  8. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    Give 2 weeks notice. Worst case scenario is that they fire you, which means you can start the new job right away.
  9. by   RNperdiem
    Yes you can go two more weeks. Take that final paycheck from that job and treat yourself to something nice.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I don't recommend quitting without notice. People have LONG memories and you never know when you may see them again. Give proper notice and then move on .
  11. by   Jolie
    Few positions are immediately available. Reference checks, drug screens, employee health clearances, etc. can take 2 weeks or longer to complete.

    As a hiring manager, if you told me that you would quit your current employer without notice and start my job immediately, I would not make an offer. I don't want to be on the other end of a "quick exit" when your next best job comes along.
  12. by   emmy27
    I totally understand the impulse, but give the notice and work it (or see if you can get people to pick up some of your shifts). It's a maximum of six more shifts- you can do it.

    It's good not to burn bridges, it looks bad for your hiring employer if they see you duck out on your current employer without notice, it leaves your current coworkers in the lurch if you don't give ANY amount of leeway for them to arrange coverage, and even if you don't ever want a formal recommendation from them, future employers may ask if they can confirm your eligibility for rehire with all past employers, and quitting without notice may leave you in the ineligible category, which could haunt you for a long, long time.
  13. by   FurBabyMom
    I would give and work out a notice. Others have pointed out that it's best to leave the bridge from being burned whenever possible. It's true. I'd personally have a really hard time doing that to coworkers as I've been on the receiving end of it before. I had a huge guilt complex over being out for 3.5 weeks and leaving my coworkers short when I had to have emergency surgery though. I've gotten over feeling bad for not working my day off, or for being on vacation, or unable to swap scheduled days/call, but at the same time, I'm not going out of my way to make life hard for my coworkers.
    Last edit by FurBabyMom on Oct 18, '15 : Reason: typo
  14. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Jolie
    Few positions are immediately available. Reference checks, drug screens, employee health clearances, etc. can take 2 weeks or longer to complete.

    As a hiring manager, if you told me that you would quit your current employer without notice and start my job immediately, I would not make an offer. I don't want to be on the other end of a "quick exit" when your next best job comes along.
    This is the point I was going to make. If you are currently working and list yourself as employed on your resume, the prospective employer will expect that you need to give notice to your current employer. They will also respect this as they will expect the same of you when you are ready to move on from them.

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