Penalized for Improper Outfit. Help! - page 2

by Newgraduatenurse2012 3,283 Views | 18 Comments

I am currently a Nursing Assistant and I will be graduating Nursing School next week. I had a little incident at work that it may damage my future professional reputation. About a year ago, my Nurse Manager called me to tell me I... Read More


  1. 0
    I agree with Ruby. Very poor judgement. Last week, I had to drop something off at the hospital I worked at and I wore dress pants and a nice sweater. Even though I was there for 5 minutes, I dressed my best.

    If this job is meant to be then it will be.
  2. 2
    Oh noooooo! You wore sweatpants. That is horrible! Your reputation should suffer forever!
    Not_A_Hat_Person and 16weeks like this.
  3. 1
    I cannot believe the president of the hospital emailed your NM over the 'sweatpants' incident. I just can't believe that is true. So either: 1. (as someone already mentioned) if the president of the hospital is wasting time over such trivial incidents, well then, you may not want to work for that hospital; or 2. (as Ruby mentioned) there is a whole lot more to this than just that you were wearing sweats. There basically has to be more to it if so many people are willing to make such a big deal of something that seems like nothing.

    Also, I wanted to echo what Ruby said. Every time you show up at your place of work for a work related function, dress professionally (by the way, the fact you didn't wear make up is totally inconsequential one way or the other), whether it be your assigned shift, a meeting, a class, an inservice, etc. Unless the flyer for the class, etc. specially says 'staff may wear jeans and a t-shirt to this class,' dress professionally--even your work scrubs are appropriate for certain situations, such as a CPR class. Also, never ever ever (never!!) wear anything that is controversial or even in the least bit inappropriate, such as a low cut top, a shirt with a vulgar saying on it, etc. You are judged every time you are there. Every time HR or you manager sees you, they are evaluating you. This is especially important if you want to advance your career by becoming an RN at this hospital.

    This incident may seem unfair, but, as future professional nurse, you had to know better. Sorry if this sounds harsh, but it's reality.
    jadelpn likes this.
  4. 2
    Quote from zieglarf
    Is this spam? I would swear that I've read this exact same post a long time ago.
    I read that thread too. Looks like OP got herself another user ID and started this thread again. Honestly, I have a VERY hard time believing any of this.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    zieglarf and 16weeks like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from edmia
    Honestly, I have a VERY hard time believing any of this.
    I can believe some of it: this person got in trouble for wearing sweats to something at work.

    What I don't believe: the president got involved*, the outgoing NM made a point of telling the incoming NM of this incident*, the assistance manager is talking about the incident a year later*, people are "rumoring" about it*.

    (*I do believe these if there is more to the story than the OP is telling us, such as the outfit was had a vulgar saying on it, the outfit revealed too much, or the outfit was otherwise inappropriate).
  6. 1
    Having been involved in similar incidents with my staff, I can relate with the OP. Some religious institutions and upper management have very straight laced ideas of what is appropriate attire to be worn while attending a work function on or off site. Having the CEO mention to you that you need to write-up staff for inappropriate attire (a pretty denium dress) while they came for CPR class or that a mans shirt was outside their pants (summer Poloshirt) both instances violation of dress code can be used in deciding which candidate is able to advance up the ranks. I was even chided by a manger in a different department for hiring staff with tatoos (non visable with winter attire but very visable on arms and chest with summer short-sleeve dress). None of the clothing outfits bothered me in the least as I focus on the overall care and work effort staff provide. Couseling memos have remained in my Manager files, not forwarded to HR unless second incident occurs. Along with discussion at orientation, yearly I send out dress code policy and review at staff meetings spring/winter just to keep it fresh in staff meinds as conservative work setting.

    Apologizing and laying low is best course over fresh incidents. Since incident is still brought up 4yrs later, may need to look at different facility if management has not changed.
    Altra likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Having been involved in similar incidents with my staff, I can relate with the OP. Some religious institutions and upper management have very straight laced ideas of what is appropriate attire to be worn while attending a work function on or off site. Having the CEO mention to you that you need to write-up staff for inappropriate attire (a pretty denium dress) while they came for CPR class or that a mans shirt was outside their pants (summer Poloshirt) both instances violation of dress code can be used in deciding which candidate is able to advance up the ranks. I was even chided by a manger in a different department for hiring staff with tatoos (non visable with winter attire but very visable on arms and chest with summer short-sleeve dress). None of the clothing outfits bothered me in the least as I focus on the overall care and work effort staff provide. Couseling memos have remained in my Manager files, not forwarded to HR unless second incident occurs. Along with discussion at orientation, yearly I send out dress code policy and review at staff meetings spring/winter just to keep it fresh in staff meinds as conservative work setting.

    Apologizing and laying low is best course over fresh incidents. Since incident is still brought up 4yrs later, may need to look at different facility if management has not changed.
    That denim dress may have been pretty and perfectly appropriate for a staff meeting, but when you're down on the floor with the mannikens may have been too revealing. And a dress is almost never appropriate for a CPR class.
  8. 1
    The PRESIDENT of the hospital has immersed themselves in sweatpants-gate?! Hmmmmm, forgive my skepticism....
    A sweatsuit, no matter how cute/classy/conservative/"you think is appropriate" is NEVER the right choice for a work-related function. Were you being compensated for the inservice? That's a good question to ask yourself in the future. If the answer is "yes" then NO to the sweatsuit!
    psu_213 likes this.
  9. 0
    This is a strange one for sure. If true ridiculous. I f there is more tot he story then useless to respond I guess.


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