Let's talk about acrylic nails ... - page 2

The "uniforms are killing us" thread had many discussions about the things other then scrubs that can make a nurse look unprofessional. Here's a place to talk about unprofessional nails ... First... Read More

  1. by   delirium
    They're against policy at my hospital. Also at my nursing school. So guess who doesn't have acrylic nails?

    My nails are nice and strong, though. Attractive.... but what I wouldn't give for a full set with a french manicure...

    (Or is that a freedom manicure?)
  2. by   Heather333
    Originally posted by CHICKTOEAGLE
    I must disagree with Heather (WITH RESPEST) . Short, cracked, bleeding nails &problem cuticles can be much more of a transmission vehicle.Icertainly disagree w/ 1-1/2 " claws but feel that well maintained manicured nails are not a problem. CHICK
    Perhaps if you are having that much trouble with your nails then maybe your Dr. can help.

    I agree that excessively long nails (even natural ones) are a hazard in themselves (ie accidentally scratching a patient). But acrylic nails, no matter what the length, are a breeding ground for organisms. It is much easier to clean natural nails, even if they are cracked, by proper handwashing. JMHO.

    Heather
    Last edit by Heather333 on Mar 26, '03
  3. by   GPatty
    I think as long as they are of a decent length and kept nice, why not?
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    GET RID OF THEM...vanity is not as important as infection control. I won't let any dagger-wearing nurse near me or mine if I have any say about it. LONG thread about this previously, as you see above. If you must wear them, then do NOT do direct patient care. Simple as that.
  5. by   Heather333
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    GET RID OF THEM...vanity is not as important as infection control. I won't let any dagger-wearing nurse near me or mine if I have any say about it. LONG thread about this previously, as you see above. If you must wear them, then do NOT do direct patient care. Simple as that.
    AMEN Deb!!!!!!
  6. by   oceanblue
    I think that as long as they are a "decent" length & color... GO FOR IT, I see them all the time on nurses.
  7. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by llg
    Regardless of what any of us think, the CDC has recommended against them, based on the most current research.
    Thank you.
  8. by   SC RN
    Okay. I've read the LONG thread that was before this one and I've thought about it and you know what? They're not worth it. I don't want to deal with the hassles and possible problems. My vanity is fighting valiantly to make me decide otherwise but I want to be a great nurse more than I want to have beautiful nails.

    Thanks for all the great replies!
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    GOOD FOR YOU! that is a smart decision!
  10. by   kittyw
    SC RN -

    If you don't take a multivitamin, you may consider starting one.

    Also, if you use nailpolish or some sort of hardener when you don't have fake nails, you may want to try to go without it for a while. Your nails may be sensitive to some of the chemicals in them, so instead of improving your nails they may actually make your nails weak and brittle.


    <reformed former acrylic nail user (before nursing), now with beautiful healthy nude nails>
  11. by   K O'Malley
    Our hospital has a policy against acrylic nails and so they should. Another thread on this subject brought up the fact that bacteria under acrylic nails spread infection in a hospital nursery and several babies died. I sure wouldn't want to be responsible for causing something like that.
  12. by   sixes
    Originally posted by Heather333
    Personally, I think that any type of false nails do not belong in bedside nursing practice. They harbor multiple organisms no matter how "clean" they look or how often they are done. Patients in the hospital are there because they are sick. They are already exposed to an array of bacteria, viruses, etc. just from the hospital environment. We nurses do not need to add to the possibility of transmitting infections because of artificial nails.

    Heather
    I have seen Nurses with real nails that are whaat I call cat claws.
    What difference does it make as long as one is practising good handwashing and wearing gloves prn?
    Nails are Nails.
  13. by   JMP
    No nails are not nails.

    False nails are overlayed ON TOP of your own nails and HARBOUR all kinds of gross things...... CDC has recommended against them and the Center for Disease Control is someone we should be listening to.

    If you own nails are troublesome....look into vitamins, supplements.

    Check this out:

    Frequent nail splitting can indicate dehydration. If you are experiencing this problem, it is recommended that you drink more fluids and use an oil designed to penetrate the nail plate.

    ALso this:

    Nutrition can affect the health of nails in a variety of ways. Iron deficiency can cause spoon-shaped nails.For years, some doctors of natural medicine have believed that zinc deficiency can cause white spots to appear on nails.In China, excessive selenium has been linked to the nails actually falling out.

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