getting out of bed side - page 2

by goalienrse 4,884 Views | 13 Comments

I have to say, just a year and a half into my career I have really really had it with nursing. I'm sick of management dinging me for everything they possibly can for nothing, I'm sick of lazy nursing assistants who feel its... Read More


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    Quote from goalienrse
    I have to say, just a year and a half into my career I have really really had it with nursing.

    I'm sick of management dinging me for everything they possibly can for nothing, I'm sick of lazy nursing assistants who feel its my job to do my job and half theirs too (and I get in trouble if I don't), patient's nasty and abusive attitudes, being over worked, no lunch or break, having to watch my back constantly, other nurses nasty attitudes... I could go on and on but I had to vent a little. lol.

    I don't have my bachelors yet, so I know I'm stuck for now. But I always hear about nursing getting out of bed side but other than management I don't hear much specifics about what is out there. I've done a little research but its hard to know where to start. Its the only way in the long run I won't get out of nursing all togather, I don't want to waste my hard earned degree.

    Any idea would be appreciated.

    And sorry for the rant. hehe
    I'm sorry you feel that way. I admit the first few years can be tough as you develop from novice to proficient nurse. I have been doing it for a while not to mention transitioned to nursing faculty. Hang in there and really strive to see the "flowers in the midst of the trash", there really are lilies in the valley.
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    All those options - case management, MDS for example do usually require certification and experience in that field, in my area. I have never seen any CM job (hospital or SNF) that asks for less than 2 years CM or MDS experience and certification. Now, you will see that some in CM or MDS have learned and were sent for training on the job, but mostly that was years ago. Years ago they'd train anyone who was willing when CM was new - and I've met one or two people who were not even nurses, doing it in hospitals because they started so long ago! Overall the idea of employers sending you off for training is less common. I'm not a CM but have been really looking into just about everything these past years to find what is reality.

    CM is hotly fought over of course by many nurses for the very reason you want to leave bedside. So does everybody else.

    HH or hospice can be good or complete scams. I'd say many more are scams than not these days. Tough one, they can be worse to do than bedside in that you might be forced to work most the day and night to keep up on your charting work - can be most of 7 days a week to get it all done dependent on the employer. After all many of these just want you to admit and chart for reimbursement - patients don't receive much care anymore. I worked Hospice for a short time and felt that I worked for criminals, so I quit.

    One thing, I'd not spend one dollar more on nursing if you can help it. Nursing can be a huge money pit with little return. I know it didn't use to be that way, but today it's totally a money pit.
    NevadaFighter likes this.
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    School nursing, home health, Case Management, ambulatory surgery, endoscopy, urgent care, clinics, doctor's offices. There are endless possibilities.
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    I am a case manager for a large medical group and mostly deal with post-discharge/post surgical patients, coordinating care. This job with this particular company requires a BSN, 3-5 years experience in disease/chronic condition management/public health or something population based, and I was also required to pass the CCM exam within 6 months of hire.

    It beats the crap out of bedside and I like wearing business casual M-F, 9-5.

    Beware the terminology. Home health/hospice case management is a VERY different animal from hospital/clinic case management.


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