Getting Noticed for Job interviews

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    Nurses, team leaders, and managers:
    If a nursing student is looking to get noticed for interviews for a future job, what observations set one student out from another as a possible job candidate?
    Last edit by kjohnson14 on Apr 29, '13
  2. 7 Comments so far...

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    Be 'visible' in a very positive way that sets you apart from your fellow students. Introduce yourself to everyone so they know your name. Remember their names. Don't just ask 'what can I do?'... jump in and do it. Answer those call bells. Fetch and carry (supplies, linens, trays, etc) to save steps for the nurses. Exhibit positivity... express gratitude to anyone who takes the time to help you or answer your questions. Arrive early - leave late. Look sharp. Make sure everyone knows how you would LOVE to work in that department.

    Yep - blatant apple polishing. We (staff nurses) know you are doing it. It shows us that you value our good opinion and want to impress us. We love it.
    carolinapooh, Pavolga, and Esme12 like this.
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    Thank you for the advice HouTx. I appreciate it; I am just finishing my precepting. I am working on being "visible" and jumping in, in any way that I can to help out all the nurses. Thanks for replying!
    Esme12 likes this.
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    I don't mean to hijack another someone else's thread, but I have a question sort of in the same vein.

    I'll be starting a new volunteer position in a hospital ER. I imagine it'll involve a typical set of volunteer duties: give out warm blankets to patients, take the specimen to the lab, etc. I plan on being in this position for at least a year, so I'd like to do something nice for nurses and the rest of the stuff every now and then.

    What are some of the nice gestures that you remember?
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    Food. LOL
    In all seriousness, the best was a volunteer who wrote little notes now and again and put them in the reciever's mailbox. "You are an amazing nurse" type of thing.
    A smile, a good morning, a "can I help you with anything" goes a long, long way.
    Also, prior to you leaving your volunteer position, write a letter to the Nurse Manager highlighting some of the hard work and great teamwork on the unit. And copy to the Director of Nursing.
    To the OP....listen, watch, learn and most of all ask questions, do your research on what you may not know, and the same applies--a good morning, smile, positive attitude....willingness and enthusiasm.
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    To the OP: keeping your MOUTH SHUT goes a long way in being noticed these days. When we have students, the quiet, mature, efficient one (the "Stealth Bomber") is ALWAYS the one I appreciate and notice the most. Seems counterintuitive to what HouTx says but, when the majority of clinical groups are little gangs of cackling, giggling, wide-eyed, asking-questions-and-babbling-nonstop, whining and complaining types....... the one who quietly knows her stuff, gets things done, arrives early and leaves late, notices things that need attention and takes care of it without making a fuss (even just picking up a piece of trash on the floor and throwing it away, or straightening a stack of towels without being asked), is considerate of WHEN to ask questions, takes notes, and has what I call a "low BS quotient" is the one who definitely gets noticed.

    This can also include your appearance. Simple hair, minimal makeup, no jewelry, clean pressed scrubs & short nails. People who LOOK low-maintenance usually are.

    Don't smoke. I can smell you a mile away if you do and that definitely pushes you down a few notches in my book.

    Save the drama for your mama. If you make a mistake or don't know something, no need for hysterics. Also, cryers and fainters are definitely viewed negatively.

    Have a sense of mature, intelligent humor when appropriate. I can't stand nervous students who laugh every 3 minutes to cover up their nervousness. Or seem to only know humor from dumb TV shows/movies. Just shut up if you can't offer anything halfway intelligent.

    Really, that quiet student who gets things done and isn't a braying donkey is the one I notice!
    Meriwhen likes this.
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    Thank you all for your advice. I greatly appreciate it.
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    Quote from Pavolga
    I don't mean to hijack another someone else's thread, but I have a question sort of in the same vein.

    I'll be starting a new volunteer position in a hospital ER. I imagine it'll involve a typical set of volunteer duties: give out warm blankets to patients, take the specimen to the lab, etc. I plan on being in this position for at least a year, so I'd like to do something nice for nurses and the rest of the stuff every now and then.

    What are some of the nice gestures that you remember?
    Honestly, it'll impress us if you are there actually doing the volunteer work you signed on for, even if it's not nursing-related tasks. We'll notice fast--and not in a favorable way--if you're just there schmoozing for a job.

    OP: same thing applies to you. Come to clinical and cheerfully do whatever it is that is assigned to you. This is not the time or place to lobby for that new grad job, and the more you harp about it, the less likely you'll be considered a candidate. Hard word impresses people more than lip service.

    And both of you remember: NO TASK is beneath you.


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