Facebook while on the clock? - page 3

I am in my last semster and will graduate in December. During my clinical rotations, I have noticed many of the nurses, while on the clock, playing on the computer, checking their email and Facebook, booking vacations and such. I... Read More

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    I was in a PCICU with my nephew after his open heart surgery. The nurses were on facebook, ordering christmas items, and various other non-medical related sites. I had my nursing "cap" off and my family "cap" on in this situation and felt very upset. I work and have worked in very stressful high intensity units in which I needed down time to blow off steam but I never let my families' see that I was doing something other than looking like I was doing hospital work. I understand that the nurse couldn't hover over his bed every second of the shift, and there is only so much cart stocking you can do but at very least give us the illusion of working. We as patients' family need to feel as you are spending every minute doing something medically related to feel secure and that you are treating our family as the most important person during you shift. The rational nursing side of me knows it is impossible to spend every moment concentrating on a patient without a break because we'll burn out but I think family deserve at very least the illusion.
    Esme12 and Nurserton like this.

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    Oh, give me a break. We all need a quick mental break here and there. As long as it doesn't interrupt pt care, it's not a problem. My job has lots of downtime and I look at Facebook occasionally. I have even used it to find a funny picture to make a pt smile. It also helps me when I'm stressed out and see a post that makes me smile or laugh. Some people are just looking to cause trouble by complaining that another nurse took a min to look at Facebook. I don't get 15 min breaks and lunch beaks my job. But 1 min to look at Facebook is a good break for me. Why is it your business what other nurses are doing? As long as they are giving good care, leave them alone.
    Last edit by SDALPN on Nov 7, '12 : Reason: using phone and accidentally pressed post instead of clicking the line I was on
    anotherone, Luckyyou, and PacoUSA like this.
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    Trust me you will find out soon enough the busy shifts (when you don't eat,pee, or even have time to think) will more than make up for the few slow shifts when you can relax and surf the Internet a little. It's way too early for you to judge!
    anotherone, wooh, and Nurserton like this.
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    Quote from ScarryBear,RN
    I was in a PCICU with my nephew after his open heart surgery. The nurses were on facebook, ordering christmas items, and various other non-medical related sites. I had my nursing "cap" off and my family "cap" on in this situation and felt very upset. I work and have worked in very stressful high intensity units in which I needed down time to blow off steam but I never let my families' see that I was doing something other than looking like I was doing hospital work. I understand that the nurse couldn't hover over his bed every second of the shift, and there is only so much cart stocking you can do but at very least give us the illusion of working. We as patients' family need to feel as you are spending every minute doing something medically related to feel secure and that you are treating our family as the most important person during you shift. The rational nursing side of me knows it is impossible to spend every moment concentrating on a patient without a break because we'll burn out but I think family deserve at very least the illusion.
    I dont think so. if pt is neglected that is one thing or to go online on facebook etc in a computer in front of pt etc but if a nurse is online and a family memeber sees that i would not carr in the least. this is like the units that do not have chairs or a nurses station so visitors have aan illusion that staff is working.
    wooh likes this.
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    I would be really careful with this for two reasons:

    1. You could be accused of "stealing time while on the clock". It is not job related and they will have proof.

    2. If you ever get named in a lawsuit your character, integrity and professionalism will get called into question for not doing your job while you were on facebook at work. Again, they can prove it.

    Food for thought.
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    I agree with Rnandsoccermom! Simply do not do it!

    The job deserves to have 100% of your attention and responsiveness while on the clock. My employer will not tolerate it.
    maureen924 and ScarryBear,RN like this.
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    Some places have firewalls to block sites, some don't. As long as your work is done, who cares? I do agree that you shouldn't be blatant with it in front of families, it's unprofessional. So when they come out of the room I usually toggle to my e-chart on the monitor and greet them You do, however, need to be sensitive to families of a critically ill patient who are under much duress already.
    When I worked the floor, I never had time to surf the net, though we could. In the neuro ICU, with a lower pt ratio, you might have some really easy walkie talkie SAH pts that have to stay in the ICU for 10-14 days because they're high risk for vasospasm or something...you could have someone really easy, have a great night, then they go south the next night and have a super crazy busy night. Like everyone else said, you take the nights you have time to do that extra stuff as a blessing and retribution for the nights you give 200% of yourself and don't eat, sit, chart, or pee until 7:00.
    decembergrad2011 likes this.
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    I've always wondered if updating Facebook while on the clock could be called into play if a legal situation arose. For instance, patient dies (unrelated to care issues), but family is angry, says care was inadequate. Could the nurse's Facebook/social media posts be subpoenaed...as in, "See??? They weren't focused on care; they were posting on Facebook?"

    Just curious. It's enough to make me avoid it.
  9. 0
    Quote from hherrn
    I agree it's a problem. Those freaking call bells go off whenever I try to update my status.
    In fact right now, some guy wants his pain meds.
    Lucky for me I have a 1/2 hour window in which to give them.

    Give pain meds or update my status...u kidding right? lol
  10. 0
    I think that some of the previous posters are way off base when they say it is ok to look on facebook during down time. I think it is unprofessional to be on your cell phone at work and even more unprofessional to be "browsing the web" or on facebook at work. The OP is a student and has noticed this.... so it must be quite obvious. I am sure she is not prying into other peoples' business. If it is obvious to her it is obvious to patient's families that walk by and see it as well. If I were visiting someone in the hospital and saw all the staff on facebook I would think negatively of their professionalism and question the care that was truly being provided...wouldn't we all? Every job I have ever worked at, even Dunkin Donuts didnt allow cell phone use because it is unprofessional and there is always something to do. If you are a manager you know there is always something to be done and that you can find something for everyone to do. I also remember a time when I was in the ER with my fiance, and we could see the nurse aid at the nursing station shopping for mirrors online. We also had noticed the manager walking behind her also watching her not working, then ask her to clean a few rooms. The nurse aid lied to her and said she had just gotten there...when we knew and the manager knew she had been there a good 30 minutes looking at mirrors. So people do neglect their work and are lazy. I absolutely cannot stand watching people at work hunched over in the corner on the cells looking at their emails or on facebook. People barely communicate with the people in the same room with them anymore, it is always the cell. Breaks are a different story.


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