Do Not Work Off The Clock, Nurses! - page 5

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

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The economic climate in this country still remains somewhat sluggish several years after the official end of the Great Recession. In addition, dwindling reimbursement rates from Medicare and private insurance companies have... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from cienurse
    Unfortunately, this would not force the corporation to do anything. What the corporation WILL do is fire the managers who are responsible for assuring that you get off duty on time and replace them with managers who will get the job done. This could include disciplinary action for those who consistently do not punch out on time and/or stay overtime. Corporations have large legal departments who advise them about what they can and cannot enforce in their facilities. I would be very careful before challenging a large corporation by purposefully violating their personell policies.
    That sounds like a threat.

    No one in managment works for free why should the hourly paid staff nurses. if the CEO's would take a pay cut like the rest of us have had to do- there wouldn't be the money problems in hospital health that there are.

    Look at the doctors in 2 articles posted on another thread on AN- doctorss and public health officals who are actually attacking the problems/causes of the high cost of health care- by attacking the problem= the chronicity and ravages of these chronic diseases by motovating better compliance of these patients and doing their jobs FOR the high risk expensive diseases their patients have. How did these doctors and public health officals manage to this. By using disease managment, case managment and healthcare informatics NOT cutting needed nurses and doctors: Not sucking the healthcare system dry of all it's funds including profits by bestowing lavish mega million dollar salaries and bonuses on CEO's with MBA who know nothing about 'HEALTH' CARE and DISEASE. These CEO's are lucky if they know how to brush their deceiptful, dishonest greedy teeth.!! And not by blaming the uninsured and under-insured for their fiscial mis managment and mishaps. It all boils down to: the MBA body of knowledge doesn't work any more and they don't have the brain power or the educational backround to know where to begin to fix the problem,so they keep doing what they have done in the past- cut staffing=save money mantra( in their delusional mind)never looking( let's use that trendy word that nursing seems to like now a days " and think for a moment and self reflect " ) to themselves and their horrendous paydays and punnish anyone who threatens their paydays!! The nursing executives continue to tickle the fancy, egos and any other body part that the CEO feels needs tickling instead of remembering - they too have RN licenses behind all those letters and advanced degrees and they too are accountable for the pee poor patient outcomes and the condition of this health care system disaster!!! More so than us pee- on hourly staff nurses.

    I say Bull crap!!! If a nurse has to work overtime because of short staffing, we damn well should be paid for it!!
    Last edit by kcmylorn on Aug 28, '12
  2. 4
    Quote from cienurse
    From the management side, we have our bosses too, who hold us accountable for being over budget with overtime and over supplies. You must admit, that supplies are not always used cost-effectively and that there is a lot of time spent complaining about staffing and workload when the time could be better used just getting the job done. I'm in management because I paid my dues working on the floors for 30 years and I know exactly where you're coming from. It isn't because we don't care or don't want to hear it. It's because we're being held accountable for doing our jobs. Unless a non-profit organization, most health care facilities are in business to make money-that's the plain truth of it. And you can't make money when the profits are eaten up by wasteful use of supplies and working overtime because of time being wasted.
    Not for profit is a tax status......not an operating budget. The catholic church is not for profit and is is extremely wealthy. It's about the tax status and the appropriations of funds/profits because they do not pay taxes. Not for profits want to make a profit too......they just don't pay taxes like a profit does.
  3. 5
    Quote from cienurse
    From the management side, we have our bosses too, who hold us accountable for being over budget with overtime and over supplies. You must admit, that supplies are not always used cost-effectively and that there is alot of time spent complaining about staffing and workload when the time could be better used just getting the job done. I'm in management because I paid my dues working on the floors for 30 years and I know exactly where you're coming from. It isn't because we don't care or don't want to hear it. It's because we're being held accountable for doing our jobs. Unless a non-profit organization, most health care facilities are in business to make money-that's the plain truth of it. And you can't make money when the profits are eaten up by wasteful use of supplies and working overtime because of time being wasted.
    Are you seriously saying that nurses are staying overtime to do their charting (and often not getting paid for it) because they're spending all the time on their shift that they should be charting complaining about uncompensated overtime?

    Seriously? When they hardly have time for a bathroom break, and have no time to sit down and eat during a 12-your shift?

    Seriously, cienurse?

    Now tell me: Why are the top hospitals in the industrialized world all non-profit institutions?
    montecarlo64, Aurora77, TheCommuter, and 2 others like this.
  4. 2
    Quote from cienurse
    Unfortunately, this would not force the corporation to do anything. What the corporation WILL do is fire the managers who are responsible for assuring that you get off duty on time and replace them with managers who will get the job done. This could include disciplinary action for those who consistently do not punch out on time and/or stay overtime.
    No one really knows what "this" is because you didn't quote or reference the post you're replying to. If I start consistently getting forced out the door before my charting is done, I will be writing the notes I said I'd write. The other day I documented that I didn't hang another bag of normal saline (on a healthy pt that probably didn't need their whopping 60/hr anyway) because we didn't have any. If the reason I can't do my job is my employer's fault, that's how it will be documented.

    Quote from cienurse
    Corporations have large legal departments who advise them about what they can and cannot enforce in their facilities. I would be very careful before challenging a large corporation by purposefully violating their personell policies.
    Corporations' large legal departments are often wrong. Check out all the FLSA class action lawsuits and settlements out there. Misclassification as exempt employee, forced clock outs, not paying for breaks, Chinese overtime....
    Akewataru and Cold Stethoscope like this.
  5. 5
    Quote from cienurse
    From the management side, we have our bosses too, who hold us accountable for being over budget with overtime and over supplies. You must admit, that supplies are not always used cost-effectively and that there is alot of time spent complaining about staffing and workload when the time could be better used just getting the job done.
    You can call all of our complaining our "paid 15 minute breaks" that we never get.
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    I dont want to work off the clock, but I am afraid of being terminated if I stay over and finish charting. We have been told many times we must clock out one hour after end of shift, no exceptions. We take up to seven patients per med surge shift-12 hrs. Usually the hr post shift is enough to finish my charting, however sometimes it is not. Especially when I have discharged, got admissions and still 7 pt per shift. Sometimes it takes more than one hour post shift and management says we can not stay clocked in past 8am. It is upsetting to me
    sistasoul and montecarlo64 like this.
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    I don't work off the clock, but I routinely work through the one hour lunch that's automatically substracted from my paycheck each shift.
    I figured that up:
    $26.00 an hr x 3 shifts a week = $78.00
    a pay period = $156.00
    a month = $312.00


    a year = $3744.00
    That's just one hour a day x 3 days for a year.
    I'M BEING ROBBED!!!!!! I'm going to have to rethink "giving" my employer that extra hour and not filling out a missed lunch form.
    Last edit by imintrouble on Aug 30, '12
    Akewataru and kcmylorn like this.
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    and if the employer gives any guff or lip service- take it like a "good little nurses"(to their faces) and write their butts up/a complaint letter to your state Department of Labor-- Wage and Hour commission- you'll get your money owed you. And don't forget to write in your letter that you want to write this anomiously because you feel your job will be threatened.

    No one now a days can afford to give to a greedy employer $3,700 per year/per nurse.

    If you stole $3,700 per year from them- they would certainly charge you with larceny( larceny because it is over a certain amount)
    Akewataru and imintrouble like this.


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