Can you have multiple RN licenses in different states?

  1. 0
    Here's the thing...I'm going to try and get into my 2-year community colleges RN-program or 1-year LPN program. My girlfriend is planning on going back to school in either the Spring or Summer of next year and she thinks it'll take at least 1-2 years to finish her teaching certificate and I'm hoping to get accepted into this program in the Fall of 2013,

    Anyways, do you think if I finish and graduated from their program & passed my NCLEX for my RN in MO or if I could take it for KS that be even better . Anywho, do you think I could transfer my RN-MO license to Kansas if thats the case? The 2-year college I would plan on going to is fully accreditted both regionally and nationally I know that.

    If I don't get accepted or if the licenses don't transfer I'll just get my CNA in KS and leave it at that for awhile so I can be happy with her.
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    It is possible for you to hold licenses in more than one states. Compact states, for instance, allow you to hold a license in one state, and practice in another,with approval from the board of nursing in the "other" state. However, not all states participate in this. A good way to know is to check with the board of nursing for KS and MO (they may be part of the compact states, but I do not know). I have a license in MA and in TX. However, I have two SEPARATE licenses, as MA is not a compact state. Hope this helps!
  5. 0
    You can hold as many licenses as you are willing to pay for and maintain (meet the requirements for CE, etc.).
  6. 0
    You have one license, and then receive endorsements to any other State that accepts your credentials (meaning you graduated from an accredited school and have passed the NCLEX). There are instances in which one may hold a license in one State but NOT receive an endorsement (what you're thinking of as "another license") if the person applying doesn't meet the minimum requirements--ie: online schools that are not recognized in other States.

    Otherwise, you can get whatever endorsements you want in as many States as you want...which is exactly what travelers do.
  7. 0
    Quote from RNsRWe
    You have one license, and then receive endorsements to any other State that accepts your credentials ... an endorsement (what you're thinking of as "another license") ...
    I'm curious about what you mean by this -- it is "another license" that you get; one is applying for licensure in a new/different state by endorsement, and the "new" state issues you a license to practice in that state (and then you have two licenses -- it's not like they send you a sticker to put on your original license, or something).
  8. 0
    As a clarification, if not compact-related, those "endorsements" still cost money.

    If you live in State A, a compact state, that's where you get your primary license. You can then use that to go to any other compact state (and not all 50 are in the compact) and practice without having to buy a new one.

    If you work across the state line in State G, a noncompact state, you will have to apply for and get a State G license by endorsement. Then you have 2 licenses.

    If you work in telephonic case management out of your house or a company office in State A and run cases in 5 compact and 6 noncompact states, you will need to get licenses in those 6-- at least your employer should pay for them.

    I have licenses in 8 states and the cost me a boatload of money to get them-- fingerprints, background checks, CEUs in abuse or state-specific regs for some, not so much for others-- and more to renew. I am letting a few go as it's unlikely I will need them again.
  9. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    If you live in State A, a compact state, that's where you get your primary license. You can then use that to go to any other compact state (and not all 50 are in the compact) and practice without having to buy a new one.
    (Just to clarify further, you can use your State A license to practice in any other "compact state" as long as you still live (maintain a permanent residence) in State A. If you move (your permanent residence) to another compact state, you still have to apply (and pay) for a new license in that state.)
  10. 0
    Thanks everyone! This really cleared up a lot.

    The only issue was that MO is a compact state & KS is a noncompact which I was planning to move to & eventually take residency in which seems like you could get a license in especially if you declare primary residency there. But you guys cleared a lot of things up. Concorde Career College accepted me into their program but upon further research I found out they weren't regionally accredited so I told them goodbye before I gave them my registration fees. The 2-year community college I'm going to is both regionally & nationally accredited & seems to be a reputable school.

    If all else fails I'll go to a school in KS to not worry about it . Thanks again everyone!
  11. 0
    Quote from Little_Bear2013
    Thanks everyone! This really cleared up a lot.

    . . . Concorde Career College accepted me into their program but upon further research I found out they weren't regionally accredited so I told them goodbye before I gave them my registration fees. The 2-year community college I'm going to is both regionally & nationally accredited & seems to be a reputable school.

    If all else fails I'll go to a school in KS to not worry about it . Thanks again everyone!
    Aren't you a smartie! Way to exercise judgement and not be bamboozled by a commercial school sales pitch. Keep it up - You're gonna be a great nurse.


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