Fired By My Patients - page 3

Dear Nurse Beth, I am 58 and a new 2-Yr. RN, I am a soft spoken, rule following, dutiful person & RN. I always inquire about my patients stay in the hospital but tend not to pry beyond that. I... Read More

  1. by   kp2016
    As the In Charge Nurse who has spoken with patients who have requested a new nurse I can tell you the patients always told me exactly why they didn't want the nurse they had initially been assigned. Honestly the reasons varied a lot and were sometimes very valid and sometimes completely ridiculous. Thanks to patient satisfaction surveys and their direct impact on the potential yearly raises for the entire unit any patient who complained was going to get a new nurse regardless.
    As being dismissed is an ongoing issue I would suggest you talk to the charge nurse or who ever the patient spoke with to request a new nurse and ask exactly what the issue was then you can work on how to correct it.
  2. by   jkel0912
    I am a brand new nurse, and I hate my first job.
    I recently graduated from nursing school, and started looking for jobs. Of course, all my hospital applications got no response due to my lack of experience. The only place that called me for an interview was a nursing home, and I got the job...
    Now comes the "fun" part: I have 35 patients every day, on different floors, different sides of the building. They are rarely the same 35 patients, as I float everywhere, so I don't really have the chance to get to know them. I have 2 hours to pass their morning meds, and each have at least 10-15 different meds to take... they never stay in one place, as they move around the building after breakfast for activities or just at their leisure, so I am having a hard time finding them sometimes, especially since I don't know what most of them look like... which is why I am late in passing meds all the time. I had to learn the computer system, the communication system with other members of the care team, the nurses training me were generally lacking patience in explaining things and had a patronizing attitude.
    I requested more training days after the 9 days provided, because I honestly didn't feel safe handling all this at the same time as a new nurse. They gave me a few extra days, but I felt ridiculed for it, and it always feels like the other nurses are talking behind my back, and consider me incompetent. I feel absolutely horrible every day at work, I dread going there, and I feel like crying before every shift... I don't know what to do. I know it will get easier once I become more familiar with the setting, the system, and the patients, but now I am having a very hard time and I am completely miserable.
    Just had to vent here, hoping to get some advice on how to handle things...
  3. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Sometimes quiet people are perceived as snobbish. Inside you are probably humble and courteous, but, depending on their own history, mindset, life experiences, they might see you as something completely different than what you really are.

    Make 'em laugh, make 'em laugh, all the world loves a clown, make 'em laugh. From
    "Singing In The Rain". Great movie - Doris Day, Gene Kelly, and Donald O'Connor. Great music and dancing, great philosophy. So try some humor, is the point.

    Try being a little more talkative, ask about their hospital stay, remark on their kids, pets, whatever. If you see lovely plants or evidence of a hobby - collector of thimbles, a train set up, crochet in the works, whatever - strike up a conversation about that.

    Take a couple of conversation pieces to the job. "Here's a picture of my baby" (your dog, your bird, your car or kids, whatever). "Do you like crossword puzzles"? "Do you feel like building this jigsaw puzzle"? (make it just a few pieces, not 500 or 1000).

    And your supervisor really needs to be frank with you about the reasons for patients not taking to you much. She or he is probably hoping you will bring up this topic. So let the Sup know that you are puzzled and worried and want to get to the bottom of the matter, so ask her to please be upfront with you and help you learn how to make things better.

    Best wishes.
    Yessssss... I'm a very quiet person and I don't communicate in the same way other people do. I have very awkward social skills and I don't know how to make small talk. I generally overcompensate by smiling a lot, but I get called snobby or rude, even though I try to always make sure I speak with a polite tone, where you can hear me "smiling" while I talk.

    I've had people completely switch their personalities from being bubbly and laughing with their friends, to looking at me and practically rolling their eyes or scoffing, even though I'm speaking politely and am smiling. I don't know what more I can do differently. I won't ever be extroverted and in the same mindset as them because I have a differing personality, so I don't know what else they expect me to do.

    Even recently in my CNA course, a girl I was carpooling with told me she thought I was "cold" before we started talking (as in rude or unfriendly). I either get called "really sweet" or "really rude" depending on how a particular perceives me.
  4. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from jkel0912
    I am a brand new nurse, and I hate my first job.
    I recently graduated from nursing school, and started looking for jobs. Of course, all my hospital applications got no response due to my lack of experience. The only place that called me for an interview was a nursing home, and I got the job...
    Now comes the "fun" part: I have 35 patients every day, on different floors, different sides of the building. They are rarely the same 35 patients, as I float everywhere, so I don't really have the chance to get to know them. I have 2 hours to pass their morning meds, and each have at least 10-15 different meds to take... they never stay in one place, as they move around the building after breakfast for activities or just at their leisure, so I am having a hard time finding them sometimes, especially since I don't know what most of them look like... which is why I am late in passing meds all the time. I had to learn the computer system, the communication system with other members of the care team, the nurses training me were generally lacking patience in explaining things and had a patronizing attitude.
    I requested more training days after the 9 days provided, because I honestly didn't feel safe handling all this at the same time as a new nurse. They gave me a few extra days, but I felt ridiculed for it, and it always feels like the other nurses are talking behind my back, and consider me incompetent. I feel absolutely horrible every day at work, I dread going there, and I feel like crying before every shift... I don't know what to do. I know it will get easier once I become more familiar with the setting, the system, and the patients, but now I am having a very hard time and I am completely miserable.
    Just had to vent here, hoping to get some advice on how to handle things...
    I'm really sorry to hear that you're experiencing that. When I did my CNA clinicals, I sometimes was treated rudely (though most of the time, people were very kind). I had no choice but to ignore it- I was polite and had a good attitude, and if I needed somebody to show me something again or I had a lot of questions, I asked, even if I was afraid a person would get annoyed or think less of me. My mentality was: I'm competent, I'm here to do a job, and to keep patients safe. It might take me longer to learn a particular thing, but I WILL learn it, and if you get annoyed with me asking a question, then tell it to your diary. (I never spoke to anyone rudely, rather, I was just assertive when I asked my questions or said that I needed help)
  5. by   cbatal
    I can say the few times this has happened to me I understand how unnerving it can be. Maybe like others have said your patients find your soft spokenness as you being rude although you don't intend that at all. I always say that you sometimes have to come out of your shell and own situations even if you're unsure--just always ask for help. Also remember maybe it wasn't you maybe they were having a bad day. Don't take it personally and just be the best nurse you know you can be.


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