What retention strategies do your hospitals use??? - page 2

HI all, Would like to know what kind of RETENTION programs your hospitals are using???? Baylor weekend incentives, etc. etc?? How has your workplace changed to make you want to stay at your... Read More

  1. by   Bermuda
    What I can't figure out is that the hospital will pay agency $42/hr to work and they sign a contract 13 weeks full-time and yet you carry a ba--buster assignment daily and then come 3pm they send 2 nurses home because we had a few discharges God forbid we should have a bit of an easy day minus a patient or two. Then of course the agency nurse is still there..why do they not pay us the bigger $$$ and we are all in house and can do the JOB? Yet... they allow us to leave but will hire a new grad in your place for $19/hr no experience and there you go 20 years experience but you cost more $$ so they let you go? ????? v Viscious circle...
  2. by   lee1
    Originally posted by Bermuda
    What I can't figure out is that the hospital will pay agency $42/hr to work and they sign a contract 13 weeks full-time and yet you carry a ba--buster assignment daily and then come 3pm they send 2 nurses home because we had a few discharges God forbid we should have a bit of an easy day minus a patient or two. Then of course the agency nurse is still there..why do they not pay us the bigger $$$ and we are all in house and can do the JOB? Yet... they allow us to leave but will hire a new grad in your place for $19/hr no experience and there you go 20 years experience but you cost more $$ so they let you go? ????? v Viscious circle...
    Why don't you confront your so called leadership and ASK them these same questions. Demand responses from THEM, just as they demand from you. We are all adults. Even though you may feel intimidated your leadership must be holding monthly or quarterly at least meetings with staff such as a RN forum or something similar where the VP of nursing meets with staff on the day shift and possibly the evening shift. Questions can still be framed in a nice manner. If the answers are vague then try to insist that they answer the questions, afterall, they really don't deliberately want to lose their experienced nurses, now do they???? Ask them even that.
  3. by   ANnot4me
    I work in one of those new grad nurse mills. It's like the place has a revolving door. They take nurse satisfaction surveys only to waste time and money to rebut our issue point by point. They also say "people leave here to pursue other goals" or whatever. The fact of the matter is that people do their year and leave. If the place was a great place to work people would stay. I would certainly go out of my way to keep a job that I really enjoyed. Instead I prostitute myself for the money. I'm not saying I don't care or that I don't do my best, I just comprise my beliefs and self-respect for money.
  4. by   caroladybelle
    Whattttttttt???

    You mean hospitals are trying to retain nurses????

    I haven't seen any evidence.

  5. by   lee1
    Originally posted by caroladybelle
    Whattttttttt???

    You mean hospitals are trying to retain nurses????

    I haven't seen any evidence.

    Well then I guess they are not concerned with their own outcomes !!!
    very short sighted and many pounds foolish.
    what is wrong with these people
  6. by   shannonRN
    Originally posted by lee1
    Would like to know what kind of RETENTION programs your hospitals are using????
    nothing, nada, zip, zilch....it seems like we are loosing staff daily. we have lost almost half of our hospital based resource to better playing hospitals in the area. okay i guess their idea of retention would be the $5 dollars an hour extra when you pick up extra shifts. if you already at full time, this adds on to your time and a half. who wants to work extra when in doing so you will only make the 3rd nurse on for that shift?

    haven't you heard...you are worth more to another company than you are to your own...i get it all the time. it's a load of phoey if you ask me.
  7. by   lee1
    Originally posted by shannonRN
    nothing, nada, zip, zilch....it seems like we are loosing staff daily. we have lost almost half of our hospital based resource to better playing hospitals in the area. okay i guess their idea of retention would be the $5 dollars an hour extra when you pick up extra shifts. if you already at full time, this adds on to your time and a half. who wants to work extra when in doing so you will only make the 3rd nurse on for that shift?

    haven't you heard...you are worth more to another company than you are to your own...i get it all the time. it's a load of phoey if you ask me.
    I wonder if you can accuse hospitals of misuse of public funds for NOT being more aggressive with retention programs???? I wonder how much money they are spending on recruitment, recruitment????? After all it does cost money to constantly precept, train new people
  8. by   Gotalovethekids
    My hospital has wonderful recruitment stratigies but not much for retention! The hospital provides a FULL scholarship (books, room & board, Tuition) to nursing students enrolled in Nursing classes if you agree to work for them for 1 year for each year of the scholarship....WELL, sounds good but there are a lots of strings attached OF COURSE! This also means that this May the healthcare system (hospital, nursing homes, home health, and other clinics) hired 30+ new grads. I WAS ONE OF THEM!!!! However I have already noticed that they aren't doing much to keep the others on an administration level. My unit manager is an exception though, she's wonderful!!! Plus they hired an RN with almost 20 years experience at almost the same pay as the new grads on our floor. I feel horrible for her!!! So, needless to say most of the grads work off thier scholarship, get a year or two of experience and HIT THE ROAD...I may be one of them when my two years are up!

    Just my hospital's program!

    Sarah
  9. by   llg
    At my hospital, nurses with seniority get preferences in their scheduling than more newly-hired nurses. Also, the pay gradient is signifant in that there is an approximately $15.00 per hour difference between the bottom and top of the pay scale. Preceptors and Charge Nurses get a $1.50 per hour differential (which is not as much as it should be, but at least it is a step in the right direction). Finally, there are retention bonuses (as opposed to sign-on bonuses). Every two years or so, bedside nurses get a bonus on their anniverary date -- the amount depends on the number years worked here. The amount of the bonuse starts small ($500 after the first year, I think) ... but it increases steadily to a maximum of $10,000 per year with 25 years seniority.

    Our basic salary and benefits package (insurance, shift differentials, etc.) is about average for our region.

    We are starting to talk seriously about increasing our tuition reimbursement benefits and helping nurses re-pay student loans. I would be real interested in learning what other hospitals are doing about these 2 benefits. Anybody able to share?

    llg
  10. by   Uptoherern
    You would think that even a dim bulb could figure out that it is easier to keep the best, than to find the best.

    At our hospital, they tried paying $60/hr (registry rate) to "staff" who worked over 36 hrs/week. (Why do they always ignore the prn pool staff???? Just because my base salary is higher? I take no benefits!) Anyway, this didn't last too long. They were still using registry cuz staff was burned out with the high acuity/staff ratios. The nurses were too tired Now, they have decided to stop the $60 rate, and have lowered it to $49 (non-specialty units) and $55 (specialty units.) I don't think this is even, really, a retention issue. They are so desperate for nurses, this is just to try to overwork the nurses that they have. I also wonder why the er is not considered a specialty unit.... could a med-surg or ob nurse float to the er?

    The last time management offered a retention bonus (again, of course, only to "real staff nurses", not us peon pool nurses who've been with the same hospital for over 10 years), they offered a $1000 bonus for rns to stay. This was after they dismantled our med-surg floor, fired the best nurse managers, and divided us up between tele and ortho. The rn's took the bonus, and then 42 of them quit! Take them apples, you idiot management people!
  11. by   lee1
    Originally posted by llg
    At my hospital, nurses with seniority get preferences in their scheduling than more newly-hired nurses. Also, the pay gradient is signifant in that there is an approximately $15.00 per hour difference between the bottom and top of the pay scale. Preceptors and Charge Nurses get a $1.50 per hour differential (which is not as much as it should be, but at least it is a step in the right direction). Finally, there are retention bonuses (as opposed to sign-on bonuses). Every two years or so, bedside nurses get a bonus on their anniverary date -- the amount depends on the number years worked here. The amount of the bonuse starts small ($500 after the first year, I think) ... but it increases steadily to a maximum of $10,000 per year with 25 years seniority.

    Our basic salary and benefits package (insurance, shift differentials, etc.) is about average for our region.

    We are starting to talk seriously about increasing our tuition reimbursement benefits and helping nurses re-pay student loans. I would be real interested in learning what other hospitals are doing about these 2 benefits. Anybody able to share?

    llg
    Wow, can you give us a hint about where you work???
    Sounds great.
    At my hospital the starting salary is about $9/hr less than mine, BUT, I am an experienced critical care nurse knowledgeable in IABP/CVVH/LVAD. My critical care experience is very expanisve having been doing almost every kind of ICU over the last 30 years.
    If I am in charge I get $1/hr more, maybe, generally they forget to pay you and you have to grieve it.
    I get nothing for precepting. I have precepted the last 3 years every spring semester to high GPA senior BSN students doing a critical care rotation.
    I have to work every other weekend and every other holiday unless there are too many people scheduled then and only then do I get seniority.
    NO retention bonuses, only yearly raise based on union contract
    NO pension other than 6% match to my 403K
    NO retirement medical benefits
    NO incentive not to call in sick
    I have to pay for parking
    My tuition reimbursement is limited to $3000/year
    Only allowed 2 seminar days per year and have to fight to get them
    My dental insurance is not as good as it used to be
    No vision insurance
  12. by   susanmary
    Educational reimbursement of up to $2,500 for full-time RNs. Nothing else that I can think of.

    What WILL work: Safe/supportive working conditions where RNs know they are giving safe, expert care and not putting their license in jeopardy AND respectable benefits (salary, insurance, available day care) are what WILL retain RNs.
  13. by   lisamct
    Sometimes it seems that my employer actively seeks to lose experienced nurses rather than retain them. We have a yearly wage increase but its governmently regulated, nothing to do with employers, however this only happens for the first 5 years on a certain grade and then it stops till you get a promotion. Study time is generally only granted for manditory training, anything other than this has to be done in your own time and paid for yourself. We have no extra payments for co-ordinating the service or for preceptorsip duties. We always work short staffed and with an unbearable workload with no support or acknowledgement from management. We have an active union however the last nurse who attempted to air some grievences through them was ''unofficially'' disiplined by management for not going through appropriate line management first.
    Why am i still working for them, well, its the NHS and unfortunately in the UK theyres not many other options,Im always looking though.
    Lisa

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