Up-credentialing: Why the move to the BSN is inevitable.

  1. 3
    As this article from yesterday's paper points out, more and more employers are requiring bachelor’s degree for entry-level jobs that clearly do not require the credential. As you read the article, it becomes ever more apparent that the primary reasons employers are doing this is simply because they can. This is somewhat similar to what is being done in nursing with respect to employers requiring a BSN where it clearly is not an essential credential. In a large – and growing - part of the country, the BSN has become the de facto minimum educational credential and in my opinion, will shortly become the de jure standard.

    As is the case with the Borg, resistance would seem to be futile.

    It Takes a B.A. to Find a Job as a File Clerk
    By CATHERINE RAMPELL

    ATLANTA —The college degree is becoming the new high school diploma: the new minimum requirement, albeit an expensive one, for getting even the lowest-level job.
    Consider the 45-person law firm of Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh here in Atlanta, a place that has seen tremendous growth in the college-educated population. Like other employers across the country, the firm hires only people with a bachelor’s degree, even for jobs that do not require college-level skills.

    This prerequisite applies to everyone, including the receptionist, paralegals, administrative assistants and file clerks. Even the office “runner” — the in-house courier who, for $10 an hour, ferries documents back and forth between the courthouse and the office — went to a four-year school. . .
    Full text via this link:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/20/bu....html?src=recg
    KariCraw31, joanna73, and kabfighter like this.
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  3. 22 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    In my Transitions to RN Role course, it was taught that ASN RNs were initially intended to be bedside nurses, LPNs as the role of nursing assistants, with that being the 'ground level', so to speak. Lots of hospitals are trying to implement that. There is actually one in Atlanta that have pulled their LPNs out of the medication administration role and gave them the option of performing at a lower level or accepting pink slips. The LPN that I know, chose to accept the lower level because it was less stressful and it didn't affect her pay. I must say that I would have done the same thing, instead of arguing the fact that I'm a skilled nurse who can run circles around some RNs. Three years ago, I chose to pursue the RN because of economic changes forcing changes on the job, especially with staffing and the availability of shifts. I was an LPN of more than 20 years at the time, working med/surg. As soon as I passed the NCLEX in 2010, my hospital, also in Atlanta, did a company survey to determine how many RNs held BSN degrees. It didn't take a rocket scientist to see where they were planning to head with that one. So, as when I was an LPN pursuing an avenue to ensure my survival, I've been casually pursuing the BSN while it's still my choice and not a requirement. As stressful as nursing school is, and even more so if trying to work, it is still much easier to accomplish when you don't have the added 'do it or lose your job' factor hovering over you.
    SE_BSN_RN, joanna73, gabulldogs, and 1 other like this.
  5. 8
    I hear many ADN's saying a BSN is unnecessary. Not a single one of them has been able to tell me how requiring a BSN would hurt nursing as a profession. I have stated many times that requiring a BSN would help working nurses tremendously. Not so much with the added knowledge but with added pay. I feel if a BSN is required that would give nurses more of a leg to stand on to demand better pay. How do you convince an industry that $25 an hour is too low when the education requirement is an Associates Degree? How many Associate Degrees can get you a job paying more than $15 an hour? Yes, I know, many ADN nurses will say they can work circles around most BSN's. That may be true but don't forget someone that graduates high school can be hired to do your job in 18 months. When you can be replaced that quickly by a 19-20 yr old it only hurts your future pay.
    kabfighter, monkeybug, SE_BSN_RN, and 5 others like this.
  6. 5
    Quote from LYNDAA
    Three years ago, I chose to pursue the RN because of economic changes forcing changes on the job, especially with staffing and the availability of shifts. I was an LPN of more than 20 years at the time, working med/surg. As soon as I passed the NCLEX in 2010, my hospital, also in Atlanta, did a company survey to determine how many RNs held BSN degrees. It didn't take a rocket scientist to see where they were planning to head with that one. So, as when I was an LPN pursuing an avenue to ensure my survival, I've been casually pursuing the BSN while it's still my choice and not a requirement. As stressful as nursing school is, and even more so if trying to work, it is still much easier to accomplish when you don't have the added 'do it or lose your job' factor hovering over you.
    Lynda,

    I admire your ability to look ahead and plan well for the future -- even when it may not be convenient for you. Over the 35 years of my career, I have seen so many nurses spend so much energy fighting the inevitable and NOT looking out for themselves and their families by preparing for their future careers. The world passes them by and they become increasingly bitter.

    I tell the students and young nurses I work with that "YOUR career will be in the future -- so that is the world and career you need to prepare for. Don't base your decisions on the fact that 'somebody 10 years ago got a good job without the higher credentials.' That was the past. This is now. Your career will be in the future. Plan for the future -- not for a career in the past."

    Thank you for sharing your story. I hope others are inspired by it.
    HM-8404, joanna73, gabulldogs, and 2 others like this.
  7. 3
    Quote from HM-8404
    Yes, I know, many ADN nurses will say they can work circles around most BSN's. That may be true but don't forget someone that graduates high school can be hired to do your job in 18 months. When you can be replaced that quickly by a 19-20 yr old it only hurts your future pay.
    Great point -- and a great way to say it. I'll probably use that argument some day.
    Thanks.
    HM-8404, SE_BSN_RN, and NurseGuyBri like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from llg
    Lynda,I admire your ability to look ahead and plan well for the future -- even when it may not be convenient for you. Over the 35 years of my career, I have seen so many nurses spend so much energy fighting the inevitable and NOT looking out for themselves and their families by preparing for their future careers. The world passes them by and they become increasingly bitter.I tell the students and young nurses I work with that "YOUR career will be in the future -- so that is the world and career you need to prepare for. Don't base your decisions on the fact that 'somebody 10 years ago got a good job without the higher credentials.' That was the past. This is now. Your career will be in the future. Plan for the future -- not for a career in the past."Thank you for sharing your story. I hope others are inspired by it.
    Thank you!!!!!
  9. 1
    Working on my BSN now. I have been told time and time again that many hospitals are phasing out LPNs and ADN/RNs.
    BSNINTHEWORKS likes this.
  10. 0
    Currently still LPN in LTC night shift. Conditions here are horrible!!!!!!!! Moral is rapidly on the decline........Good people are rapidly leaving and I'm not far behind. BUT I just can't leave without trying to help the residents and the other workers.........I've worked in many many many different fields but have never experienced such horrible treatment of employees. I KNOW IN MY HEART I NEED TO DO SOMETHING. JUST NEED TO DO IT RIGHT. PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!

    LIST OF BAD:

    1. Neglect of Residents (no snacks, pressure sores, no baths, skin breakdown etc......)
    2. Not enough help at NIGHT. Adm. decided to cut down to only 3 aides/60 and 2 charge nurses.
    3. LPNs are made to take call on every off days because Aides call in all the time. So we go in for Aide Work. (which contradicts them saying the census is low so they had to cut back, because we get paid time/half when we have to go in.)
    4. Adm. makes Mandatory Meetings at 2pm and expects night shift to be there regardless if they just clocked out that morning at 8am and have to be back at work that night at 7pm.
    5. Even if you have a perfect attendance, if you miss the meetings you get points against you and 20 points means termination.

    I (as many) came in hoping to make a difference but only to have our good drained from all this silly stuff.

    I do feel my License is in jeopardy I know I need to get out of there.
  11. 2
    This is one of the reasons why I'm leaving nursing if I can't stay at my current job until I'm ready to stop working. With student loans I'm still repaying and no desire whatsoever to attack O-Chem and Statistics at my age, I know I'm an endangered species: an ADN who made it into management on street smarts and sheer force of will. I cannot go back to the floor, and I'm not going back to school at this stage of life.

    What, I wonder, is to become of ADNs and LPNs who, for whatever reason, are unable, unwilling, or can't afford to go back to school? I, for one, don't know how to do much of anything else---been a nurse for 16 years, and before that I was a factory shift supervisor, auto detailer, telemarketer (for about 4 hours), office worker, and SAHM. What is out there in this economy for someone like me, who is too young to retire and too old to be considered for many positions that I'd even bother to apply for?

    It sounds negative, I'm sure, but I'm just being realistic. There are too many of my age-mates looking for jobs that aren't there for older and perhaps 'less-educated' people (sorry, but as one of the only two members of my family who graduated from college, it's hard for me to think of myself that way). I don't even want to think about working fast food or retail, but if it's what I've got to do to survive, well, it's "Welcome to WalMart. How may I help you today?"
    KariCraw31 and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  12. 1
    I agree that BSN is going to be the new normal. This is because there are just more and more nurses out there looking for work. Extra education never hurts. Im an ADN right now, but looking forward to going back for another 15 months and getting my BSN.

    Quote from HM-8404
    don't forget someone that graduates high school can be hired to do your job in 18 months. When you can be replaced that quickly by a 19-20 yr old it only hurts your future pay.
    I dont agree with that. I would be very interested to see where someone can get an ADN in only 18 months. Where I went to school not only did you have to do all your preqs, but a student wasnt even considered unless they had all their non nursing courses done as well (chem, A&P, micro, english, math ect). That took 2 years before even starting the program, which then takes another 2 (scheduled, you cant cram and get it all done in 18 months). ADN programs are very hard to get into, and almost unheard of straight out of high school.
    NB19938 likes this.


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