Up-credentialing: Why the move to the BSN is inevitable. - page 3

by chuckster 3,320 Views | 22 Comments

As this article from yesterday's paper points out, more and more employers are requiring bachelorís degree for entry-level jobs that clearly do not require the credential. As you read the article, it becomes ever more apparent... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    If you don't know the difference between "unnecessary" and "BSN hurts nursing as a profession" I'd ask for my money back for my BSN.
    Perhaps a nap would have helped before you typed this. I have no idea what you are talking about here. Read my post a little more carefully.

    Don't get so defensive about what others can see coming from a mile away. With all things equal a hospital will choose a BSN over an ADN almost every time. Hospitals do not hire strictly for beside nursing, they are hiring what they hope will be future managers. That jump is more likely for a BSN rather than an ADN.
  2. 1
    Quote from HM-8404
    Perhaps a nap would have helped before you typed this. I have no idea what you are talking about here. Read my post a little more carefully.

    Don't get so defensive about what others can see coming from a mile away. With all things equal a hospital will choose a BSN over an ADN almost every time. Hospitals do not hire strictly for beside nursing, they are hiring what they hope will be future managers. That jump is more likely for a BSN rather than an ADN.
    Yes, I know personally my manager is sitting there thinking, "Is this person management material???" when she's trying to fill up her schedule for the next month. I'm sure she really cares.

    I'm sorry you don't know what I'm talking about. Maybe you should re-read your own post, and then take a nap, and then come back, four more days later, and you'll be better at understanding.

    "All things being equal" all things are NOT equal, that's the point. There aren't a whole lot of BSN's vying for a busy med surg floor at a small-ish hospital that is one of many in a metropolitan area. So when there are a whole bunch of BSN's with 3 years of experience that would like to come work on my med surg floor, I'll be sure to worry about it.
    Bama RN likes this.
  3. 1
    I am a proponant of education beyond the ADN that I received in 1983, however, the BSN is not necessarily the answer. Having obtained a 4 yr degree before nursing, I was in no hurry to take the BSN path. It was not until 15 years later, when I applied for an advanced certification for which I was qualified, that the NLN told me I was inelegible because I lacked a 4-year degree in "health care". After looking at BSN program curriculums, I decided that none of them would teach me a single thing that I already knew, and if I had to pay tuition, I was going to seek some sort of program that would offer me a positive educational experience. I received a BBA in Health Care Administration, then a MBA in Health Care Management. Most of my classmates were nurses, which I find to be encouraging. While bedside nursing will always be important, nurses need to realize that there is a "whole new world" outside the hospital. Since receiving my degrees, I have enjoyed positions in both direct patient care and administration. I have never been treated as "inadequate" by my employer because of my lack of a BSN. In fact, the only job I would not qualify for is nursing school faculty, which has never been a goal for me. I am currently a Case Manager, which I love. I team with physicians, hospitals and other providers to deliver quality care, and it is the most fulfilling job I have ever had. As I said, I believe a 4-year degree is necessary to maintain the integrity of the profession, but nurses need to understand that they are not limited to a BSN or even MSN behind their name.
    salvadordolly likes this.


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