Unions/Attitudes - page 6

:( I am a Clinical Educator and part of a large corp. hospital system. Over the last two yrs, there has been lots of Union activity in our area. Not all of it is at the corp I work for. There are... Read More

  1. by   BSNtobe2009
    I can tell you, living in an area that was UNION to the core, those nurses that are practicing essentially patient abandonment on the job, are not going to have a leg to stand on if they get fired.

    Most people don't understand what a Union does.

    A Union doesn't make an employee unfireable, or even more difficult. It doesn't mean you can't write them up, suspend them, or otherwise repremand them.

    What a Union ensures, is that EVERYONE is treated equal. If a manager gets a chip on her shoulder and decides she doesn't like a new grad that HR hired because she has Red hair and a couple of tatoos....the nurse manager cannot start "riding" an employee until she becomes so frustrated that she quits. It also gives more senior employees that have a higher rate a pay, job protection so they aren't forced out by upper management so they can get a new grad in and pay them 35% less a year.

    It also ensures, whatever your experience, that they have to have a reason to fire you, and be able to prove it.

    Not taking patients or being insubordinate? Sorry, those nurses need to be tossed out on their butt...the COMPANY can show their policy on taking patients, and if a nurse violates direction of a supervisor, he or she won't get any help from the union if they lose their job.

    REMEMBER folks...if you like having a safe working environment, health insurance, vacation, overtime, etc...UNIONS FORCED COMPANIES TO GIVE THESE TO EMPLOYEES in the early days.....companies DID NOT give employees benefits because they wanted to, they were forced to.

    Look around you...companies are working every day to find out how they can get their employees to do more and pay them less...why do you think all companies (almost) are anti-union? It's because they will be held ACCOUNTABLE.

    If you have a chance to work for a Union hospital, I would encourage anyone to take it.
  2. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Had a class about the current state of nursing in my professional concepts class two weeks ago and I was the only person that brought up the topic of nursing unions. We had the instructors and a few core faculty in attendence and not a single one mentioned it.

    Now, as students, we do get a sweet deal from HCA Midwest: they pay for our one-year accelerated BSN and we work for them for two years. Because of this, I do plan on showing some loyalty to the company. But I have noticed that in my first 9 weeks of clinic, I've had three of the nine nurses I followed quit for another job! I've spoken with two of them and they had good reasons which highlighted an interesting part of the "nursing shortage":

    1. Nurses are likely to be unhappy with job, which causes them to quit.
    2. Since so many nurses are quiting, it is easy to quit your job and get a better one.


    That might be simplistic, and also involves a great amount of time and stress. If the midwest had a stronger nursing lobby, we would probably see higher retention and satisfaction with the nursing staff. Unfortunately, as a whole, those of us in the midwest tend to be skeptical of unions and tend to work hard even if we are not being treated fairly. This is probably why new RNs don't mind starting out at $20 an hour in KC and why it probably won't change very quickly.



    We need a student-nurses union association to help get us informed and active before we even apply for that first job.
  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from Josh L.Ac.
    We need a student-nurses union association to help get us informed and active before we even apply for that first job.
    Check out: National Student Nurses Association very active on some campuses; non-existant on others. Helpful since 1950's. It's how i got my feet wet with activism.
    It is not a union but very informative re professional issues and conventions superb.

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