Through The Eyes of The Workforce: Creating Joy, Meaning, and Safer Health Care

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    The Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation

    Through the Eyes of the Workforce: Creating Joy, Meaning, and Safer Health Care

    Report of the Roundtable on Joy and Meaning in Work and Workforce Safety

    Workplace safety is inextricably linked to patient safety. Unless caregivers are given the protection, respect, and support they need, they are more likely to make errors, fail to follow safe practices, and not work well in teams.

    This report looks at the current state of health care as a workplace, highlights vulnerabilities common in health care organizations, discusses the costs of inaction, and outlines what a healthy and safe workplace would look like. The report concludes with seven recommendations for actions that organizations need to pursue to effect real change.
    Download the White Paper [PDF]

    Download the Executive Summary only [PDF]
    herring_RN, tewdles, stokedrn, and 1 other like this.
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Great article, Karen. I'm printing it to leave in our break room.
  4. 0
    This is a HUGE issue where I work; the lack of mutual respect in my workplace has caused a huge turnover of valuable, experienced staff; the remaining staff are frustrated and negative; new hires wonder what they got themselves into. I will be sharing this with my management. Thanks for posting!
  5. 0
    Good find. I like that he lists recommendations to implement in other facilities.
  6. 0
    Ugh... I'm so frustrated that this article like many others concerning patient safety and nurse health are not taken seriously. Seriously, 10K readers online and sooo very few speaking up about bedside crapola. Is my place the only place that sux right now? Is this site a student site? I'm starting to think so. I just don't get it.
  7. 3
    Don't mean to sound trite or lapse into unrepentant corny-ness, but

    Rather than moan about 'why isn't someone doing something' - we need to act...

    1. Don't Lift - period. Use mechanical lifting devices. All US organizations have to have them, since this is mandated by OSHA.
    2. Begin reporting all "near misses" - you're not doing anyone a favor by covering everything up so they won't get into trouble. This is the only way that the true magnitude of problems can come to light.
    3. Stop Blame-shaming. We're all human, therefore we make mistakes. Be supportive to colleagues rather than participating in malicious gossip. I know that this may seem contradictory to #2, but it's not. We should acknowledge honest mistakes, but recognize them as such.. not intentional lapses.
    4. Refuse to cut corners. Wash your hands each time. Apply conscious deliberation to complex tasks such as medication administration. This does take longer and may mess up your 'time management', but it is what it is. Safety is more important.
    5. Intervene when you witness problems. Don't just stand there and watch. Yes, it IS your business because it affects safety and quality...

    If each of us draws that line in the sand and stops making compromises when it comes to safety, it will make a difference.
    Altra, herring_RN, and NRSKarenRN like this.
  8. 3
    Quote from HouTx
    Don't mean to sound trite or lapse into unrepentant corny-ness, but

    Rather than moan about 'why isn't someone doing something' - we need to act...

    1. Don't Lift - period. Use mechanical lifting devices. All US organizations have to have them, since this is mandated by OSHA.
    2. Begin reporting all "near misses" - you're not doing anyone a favor by covering everything up so they won't get into trouble. This is the only way that the true magnitude of problems can come to light.
    3. Stop Blame-shaming. We're all human, therefore we make mistakes. Be supportive to colleagues rather than participating in malicious gossip. I know that this may seem contradictory to #2, but it's not. We should acknowledge honest mistakes, but recognize them as such.. not intentional lapses.
    4. Refuse to cut corners. Wash your hands each time. Apply conscious deliberation to complex tasks such as medication administration. This does take longer and may mess up your 'time management', but it is what it is. Safety is more important.
    5. Intervene when you witness problems. Don't just stand there and watch. Yes, it IS your business because it affects safety and quality...

    If each of us draws that line in the sand and stops making compromises when it comes to safety, it will make a difference.
    And if I can add--model appropriate professional behavior always. Sometimes, it can start with just you.
    NRSKarenRN, Altra, and herring_RN like this.
  9. 0
    Liked it, Karen. Very timely at work.

    Thanks!


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