Should Nursing Education Begin in the Hospital? - page 2

Just need a roll call here, add a little comment if you like, but we are really interested to find out how many nurses agree with "nursing education should begin in a hospital based nursing program."... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    Quote from fergus51
    Just to be clear, I also think it's silly that a BSN should take 6 years. You should be able to complete a Masters in that time. It's because schools run things so ridiculously. Going full time for 4 years a person should be able to get enough credit hours for a BSN (our program ran that way). The problem comes when schools schedule things so that can't happen (pre-reqs are not run certain semestres, etc) and you're forced to take another year. That's just a money grab.
    exactly! same thing going on at the community colleges as well, certain classes not offered in the summer, only have 2 classes available for a&p per semester and everbody and their brother needs to take it so we wait years to try and get into the dang class! (can you tell im irritated )
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from fergus51
    Just to be clear, I also think it's silly that a BSN should take 6 years. You should be able to complete a Masters in that time. It's because schools run things so ridiculously. Going full time for 4 years a person should be able to get enough credit hours for a BSN (our program ran that way). The problem comes when schools schedule things so that can't happen (pre-reqs are not run certain semestres, etc) and you're forced to take another year. That's just a money grab.
    yes it is. I like your suggestion for diploma-type education, but granting BSN at the end. That makes the most sense to me of all the suggestions I have ever seen to "solve the education/entry-point" debate yet.
  3. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from fergus51
    Just to be clear, I also think it's silly that a BSN should take 6 years. You should be able to complete a Masters in that time. It's because schools run things so ridiculously. Going full time for 4 years a person should be able to get enough credit hours for a BSN (our program ran that way). The problem comes when schools schedule things so that can't happen (pre-reqs are not run certain semestres, etc) and you're forced to take another year. That's just a money grab.
    this is just a bit off topic but such a valid point! That about the univestities being money grubbers. We all understand education is not free, but causing persons to stay longer doesn't really provide that much money and prevents that student from moving on and prevents many students from starting to begin with. That's a lot of years to go without adequate income, specially for adults. Adult includes young ladies and sometimes you men who became parents early in life.
  4. by   missmercy
    Quote from Dixiedi
    Oh goodness, I didn't think anyone would not understand how a hospital based nursing school prepares their nurses!
    No wonder there is such a rift in beliefs about how nurses should be educated. Apparently the university nurses haven't spent enough time in a hospital to know what's going on in there!
    As "a university nurse" who has spent oodles of time in the hospital both during school and afterwards, I can tell you that there are huge differences in nursing programs -- NOT ALL hospital based programs are run like yours was, not all university programs are run like mine was, some ADN programs are exceptional and others aren't -- the amount of clinical experience can depend on a number of variables: including availablilty of venues to work in, financial constraints, time issues, governmental restrictions, etc. ANY good program has a balance between clinical/on-site hours and classroom hours -- due to the high levels of technological advances and specialties, it is good for students to get as much exposure to the real world of nursing so that they can find their nitch.
  5. by   RNPATL
    I remember when the old diploma program in my area combined with the university. Many of the students loved the combination because it provided them with a nice balance between theory and the practical application of that theory in the clinical environment. Eventually, the hospital was taken totally out of the equation and the university took over the entire program, cut clinical time and changed the curriculum to reflect more management and research courses.

    While I can support the upper division courses and the need to have additional theory, I think some where along the way, we have lost the balance. With that loss, students have lost the ability to develop needed clinical skills to be successful in practice.
  6. by   fergus51
    People are all agreeing here... what's going on?
  7. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from fergus51
    People are all agreeing here... what's going on?
    I'm reallyhopeful that it's because we actually all (most anyway) DO agree and it's not becasue an opposing opinion just isn't being posted. I'd reallly love to see us in agreement!
  8. by   fergus51
    LOL! I have always thought people are more alike than they are different here

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