Real People Denied Healthcare - page 4

Real People Denied Healthcare David Welch is an RN and a patient who was denied health insurance because of minor skin cancer on his nose. This story, of an upper middle class white male nurse,... Read More

  1. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from spacenurse
    Real People Denied Healthcare

    David Welch is an RN and a patient who was denied health insurance because of minor skin cancer on his nose.
    I just have to ask....what is meant by real people? Aren't we all real? Aren't we all in need of health insurance? Just curious.
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    I think it is to show the real people to remind us this is not only an intellectual discussion.

    That it is not only unemployed addicts who are denied healthcare.

    People with insurance are also denied healthcare.
  3. by   HM2VikingRN

    Deamonte Driver, sitting next to his mother, Alyce, shows the scars from incisions for his brain surgery. (By Linda Davidson -- The Washington Post
    Twelve-year-old Deamonte Driver died of a toothache Sunday.
    A routine, $80 tooth extraction might have saved him.
    If his mother had been insured.
    If his family had not lost its Medicaid.
    If Medicaid dentists weren't so hard to find.
    If his mother hadn't been focused on getting a dentist for his brother, who had six rotted teeth.
    By the time Deamonte's own aching tooth got any attention, the bacteria from the abscess had spread to his brain, doctors said. After two operations and more than six weeks of hospital care, the Prince George's County boy died.
    Deamonte's death and the ultimate cost of his care, which could total more than $250,000, underscore an often-overlooked concern in the debate over universal health coverage: dental care.
    Some poor children have no dental coverage at all. Others travel three hours to find a dentist willing to take Medicaid patients and accept the incumbent paperwork. And some, including Deamonte's brother, get in for a tooth cleaning but have trouble securing an oral surgeon to fix deeper problems.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...702116_pf.html
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Watch this story about how an RN of 30 years is dropped from her health insurance just before being diagnosed with two stage four cancers

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2peGqRrjXek
  5. by   azhiker96
    Yes, the current system has many problems. One of the big ones is indicated in this
    Others travel three hours to find a dentist willing to take Medicaid patients and accept the incumbent paperwork.
    The big problem with Medicaid is not paperwork. It's that Congress saves healthcare dollars by lowering what they pay for procedures.
    That doesn't address the root problem of the high cost of healthcare. It doesn't address the costs of running a medical practice. I don't blame docs and dentists who opt to not take medicaid patients. A nursing analogy would be if you showed up and were told for that shift you would be paid minimum wage because the patients were all medicaid. Sure, some nurses would work the shift just as many docs accept fractional payments. I suspect many would balk at working for less than half pay.
  6. by   azhiker96
    BTW, I don't doubt anyone who reports a problem with BCBS. Years ago my wife had intense pain which turned out to be her gallbladder screaming to be set free. BCBS of Oklahoma denied my claim for 3 months because I didn't call to get the surgery pre-approved. I finally wrote the state insurance commissioner and included all correspondence. I had a check the next week. They didn't drop our coverage though, even after paying the claim.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from azhiker96
    BTW, I don't doubt anyone who reports a problem with BCBS. Years ago my wife had intense pain which turned out to be her gallbladder screaming to be set free. BCBS of Oklahoma denied my claim for 3 months because I didn't call to get the surgery pre-approved. I finally wrote the state insurance commissioner and included all correspondence. I had a check the next week. They didn't drop our coverage though, even after paying the claim.
    I'm glad your wife was able to have her surgery. And that you didn't have tp pay for what you already paid for.

    Halted health coverage suit may be far-reaching

    An appeals court will weigh Blue Shield's retroactive cancellation of a car-crash patient.

    A 2001 car accident that left Steven Hailey badly injured was the beginning of his continuing medical and financial calamity.

    While Hailey was still recovering in his Cypress home and with medical bills topping $450,000, Blue Shield of California suddenly canceled his coverage. That forced the former self-employed machinist to wait so long for surgery to repair an injured urethra, he says in a lawsuit against Blue Shield, that his bladder stopped working. Since then, he has depended on an implanted catheter that drains his urine into a bag strapped to his body.

    Now, Hailey says, he and his wife, Cindy, can't afford the care he needs because Blue Shield began garnisheeing her wages to recoup more than $104,000 it had paid for Steven's medical care before canceling him....

    ...Blue Shield is one of the state's largest sellers of individual policies, the type of coverage at issue. Unlike with employment-based group coverage, which is issued to all group members regardless of health, carriers in California and some other states are allowed to reject applicants for individual policies based on their medical histories....

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...lines-business
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    REAL LIFE STORIES OF THE UNINSURED
    AN INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETIC WITHOUT INSULIN

    He was fifteen when he first developed diabetes and required multiple daily insulin shots. Luckily he had health insurance and received medical care from the specialist at the Children's Hospital.

    However when he turned eighteen he lost his health insurance and prescription coverage. He was no longer eligible for Medicaid since his parents both received raises at jobs located outside the state. And this diabetic having recently completed high school started looking for a job himself. But now he had no health insurance and only a minimal income. He knew he couldn't pay his doctor and so he cancelled his next doctor's appointment. When his sugars climbed high, he would give himself more regular insulin.

    However, one day when he tried to refill his insulin prescription, the pharmacist told him no because the previous insulin prescription was over six months old. A common situation many Medicaid patients often find themselves in.

    http://www.assickasitgets.com/testimonials.html
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Janet Stephens was an RN for 17 years but after being diagnosed with several incurable diseases she went on disability and struggles to cover the cost of her healthcare.

    She's a talented pianist and an advocate for Single Payer healthcare reform in America.

    http://www.guaranteedhealthcare.org/...d-several-incu

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