Obamacare Survives, Supreme Court Rescues ‘Big Health’ - page 2

by herring_RN Guide

obamacare survives, supreme court rescues ‘big health’ just a quick comment on the supreme court’s decision to uphold the constitutionality of the obama healthcare legislation, i.e. that the single mandate stands. i... Read More


  1. 5
    I don't think this will improve jobs for healthcare workers. What will be the reimbursements for care? I know having it and being able to use it are 2 different issues especially with copays.

    Wooh, I have to agree. The individual policy he had looked fine, but he couldn't use it for everyday illnesses. Added to that, after that wonderful 3 month period, it went up every single month until he couldn't afford it any longer. It was hundreds of dollars every month for something he couldn't use. I guess peace of mind major medical, but it just wasn't feasible after 6 months.
    Jc1982, tewdles, wooh, and 2 others like this.
  2. 2
    Quote from chevyv
    I don't think this will improve jobs for healthcare workers. What will be the reimbursements for care? I know having it and being able to use it are 2 different issues especially with copays.
    I dont understand what you mean? Anything more than $0 is more than what hospitals were getting before. Any reimbursement would be better wouldnt it? My question remains, wouldnt this help job outlook for this field?

    The more I read, the idea is premiums would go down because of the quantity of new policies would balance out the reduced premiums.
    Hoozdo and wooh like this.
  3. 5
    i'll await to make my comment in the near future
    aquarius04, RHIA, RN, azcna, and 2 others like this.
  4. 10
    I was ecstatic when I found out. My husband was disgruntled, however, only because we don't have single-payer health care like he does in the UK. I told him, baby steps, my dear.

    I'm just getting my UK nursing license now and spent quite a bit of time learning about their nationalized health care. It was quite fascinating. They even have a bill of rights document that specifically states that the care given to patients is not affected by their ability to pay. I nearly cried when I read that. Such a beautiful statement. They have their problems, of course, but it is still much better than our system.

    One of my best friends from high school had various health issues and talked to me about some serious GI symptoms she was experiencing on top of her asthma. I told her to go to the ER. "babyRN, I can't! I only need one more month before my insurance will kick in without pre-existing conditions. If I go now, I'll have to start all over again and I can't afford my insurance rates going up." Luckily, she's fine. But that is one of the most horrid things I've ever heard of and honestly, the Europeans have a right to look their noses down at us and ask Americans like me while taking my nursing course over there whether people really die in America because of lack of health care and aren't we ashamed of ourselves?

    Yep. Pretty ashamed. Until now...
    elkpark, sapphire18, tewdles, and 7 others like this.
  5. 6
    I'm cautious .....there is a middle class struggling. Unemployed and underemployed losing their homes beating the pavement trying to stay in their homes. Struggling to make it day to day, they can't put gas in their tanks and food on the table. For the first time in history there are more poor in the suburbs.......40 % of middle class americans struggle to keep a roof over their heads and can't afford to pay another bill. THey have too much money for medicaid but not enough to get by.....making them pay any additional money will plunge them into darkness. I will benefit because they now can't throw me away or deny me because I am ill........but I remain concerned. I see insurance co getting more money in their pockets and the hospital getting more payments. I see the struggling having to pay more taxes drown under the weight of it all. What is the government going to do with all the penalties/tax they collect for those who don't have insurance? Bail out more banks? I remain skeptical, time will tell.
    TiddlDwink, Jc1982, imintrouble, and 3 others like this.
  6. 8
    "making them pay any additional money will plunge them into darkness"

    Having a member of their family fall ill if they have no insurance will plunge them into bankruptcy, and possibly, true poverty. It will be a lot more efficient for everyone if they don't have to go to an emergency room and rack up a $1500 bill for routine care. For the needy, there will be subsidies.

    This is not abstract theory. Massachusetts has had an almost identical system in place since the early 00's. RomneyCare almost equals ObamaCare.

    "What is the government going to do with all the penalties/tax they collect for those who don't have insurance?"

    The reality is that it's not going to be much money (the penalties are not high), and they're not going to have an easy time collecting said penalties. Once again, look toward the prototype in Massachusetts, where it's not much of an issue -- the vast majority of state residents are insured.
    TiddlDwink, Joe V, sapphire18, and 5 others like this.
  7. 5
    Quote from Nurse Rob
    The more I read, the idea is premiums would go down because of the quantity of new policies would balance out the reduced premiums.
    That's what happened to my insurance when RomneyCare kicked in in Massachusetts. Of course, my insurance company didn't bother telling me that they didn't phase out the old plans, but introduced a slew of new plans under the new system. I switched to a plan that was virtually identical to the one I had. The old plan was due for a yearly increase, and its premiums were roughly double those of the new plan.

    That's right. My premiums were virtually halved. There were other factors in play in the Massachusetts switchover versus the ACA, but it's telling.
    Jc1982, Joe V, tewdles, and 2 others like this.
  8. 0
    Ha. Cant wait to see this blow up in our faces. I dont see how this will help the issue at all.

    And I think that the quotes should go around 'rescue'
    Last edit by That Guy on Jun 28, '12
  9. 3
    My husband is an orthopaedic surgeon. He has seen many patients from Canada. Such patients have chosen to leave their country and have surgery here because they have been on a waiting list for two years or more, to have a hip or knee replacement.
    The patients are in pain and cannot ambulate freely or live an active life. Unfortunately surgery is not available to them because their age or particular diagnosis is not a priority.

    Many of these patients are in their 40's and told they will simply have to wait. Unable to contend with their condition, they come to the states and pay out of pocket.
    jeannepaul, chevyv, and tntrn like this.
  10. 6
    Quote from java12
    My husband is an orthopaedic surgeon. He has seen many patients from Canada. Such patients have chosen to leave their country and have surgery here because they have been on a waiting list for two years or more, to have a hip or knee replacement.
    The patients are in pain and cannot ambulate freely or live an active life. Unfortunately surgery is not available to them because their age or particular diagnosis is not a priority.

    Many of these patients are in their 40's and told they will simply have to wait. Unable to contend with their condition, they come to the states and pay out of pocket.
    I believe there will be more expensive plans you can choose if you wish more coverage than what Obamacare reguires in a basic plan. There is nothing in Obamacare that limits your choice of choosing a "premium" plan and it does not prevent you from seeking treatment outside the U.S. on your own dime. Kind of a high class problem in my view.
    elkpark, Joe V, not.done.yet, and 3 others like this.


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