Obamacare: Should I get out while I still can?

  1. 0
    Hello I didn't know exactly where to ask this, but I am very concerned and need some guidance...I am just about to take prerequisites to get into a BSN program. I would really love to be a nurse! And I have been looking forward to getting into the nursing field. However, the Court's ruling on Obama's Healthcare plan has me nervous.

    All the nurses I've known/talked to have not had good things to say about the law or how it will affect them. I know Medicaid is very slow to pay and doesn't reimburse doctors/hospitals much of the actual cost, so won't that trickle down to nurses' pay?...Also, the nursing shortage we have ALREADY is bad enough..so won't Obama's new law just make the problem that much worse by adding more people to a system that already desperately needs more nurses?. I'm also concerned that the quality of care will suffer as well (for the patients).. I really need advice on this...I want to be a nurse, but the uncertainty and the possibility of more work with less pay is not at all attractive...its scary!

    So my question is this: Should I go ahead with my plans to go to nursing school despite the unsure future? Or should I get out and find a new rewarding career path to take while I still can? Maybe I can wait awhile to see how things play out first?

    P.S=I had wanted to eventually be a nurse practitioner (career goal)..And please don't question my desire to be a nurse and my love for what nurses do. I would LOVE to be a nurse, but .I just don't want to go into alot of student debt, work my butt off, and delve into a career when there is so much uncertainty about things such as possible cuts to the pay, and the overall nursing shortage. The way I see it, I'm at a crossroad right now and can take either fork..I just want to make an educated, good decision. All answers and advice are VERY appreciated!!
  2. 55 Comments so far...

  3. 13
    1. There is no nursing shortage. Biggest myth to ever float the media and be believed. Nurses are out of work all over the U.S.

    2. Getting paid pennies on the dollar by Medicaid is more than the big fat nothing we currently get paid to treat the same patient population now that will benefit from this law.

    Some feel this law is expected to help the nursing profession, not hurt it. It is expected to hurt the MD profession. Massachusetts already has a similar law in place and you can look at how nursing is there for an indication of how it may be more widespread across the nation, but the absolute truth of it is nobody knows for sure. You will have to do your own research and come to your own conclusions. Best of luck.
    Last edit by not.done.yet on Jun 30, '12
    turnforthenurseRN, elprup, Anggelica, and 10 others like this.
  4. 17
    The public is very polarized about this bill and there is a lot of misinformation out there about it. In such cases, the truth is usually somewhere in between the extreme views. If you and your friends are getting your information from only 1 side of the political spectrum, you are not getting a balanced view.

    The American Nurses Association has endorsed it. Use your common sense. If it were as bad for nurses as you fear, why would that organization be endorsing it?

    It is not a perfect bill and will need to be "tweaked" as do most major programs as they are implemented -- but neither is it as bad as Obama's political opponents are making it out to be.

    If you really want to be a nurse ... this should not be a major factor in your career decision.
    Last edit by llg on Jun 30, '12
    tewdles, sweetf, chwcbesteph, and 14 others like this.
  5. 9
    Many other Countries have policies in place that are similar to the ones endorsed by the new bill. I have received medical care in several of these countries. It was as good as, if not superior to the care I got in the US. (And it was WAY less expensive even when I got care in France as an uninsured person).

    These people you think that will be "added" are already seeking healthcare. They will not be added, they are already there. You can meet many of them at your local Emergency Department, which they use because they can not be seen in a primary doctor office or, especially a specialty physicians office. So very few people will be "added" they might however, get appropriate care for conditions at much earlier times, allowing them to manage them better, and get treatment in a timely manner. Hospitals give away a large percentage of free "Charity care" each year, its a line item in the budget. So these people are already there- and because of limited care we often are paying out huge amts to fix a problem in an advanced stage that could have been fixed at the early stage for less.

    There is not a nursing shortage. I know you may have heard this, but current new graduate nurses are reporting 11-12 month job searches after graduation. So, you will need to really weigh the options. If you are entering the field looking at quick employment and high pay- you might really need to look elsewhere.
  6. 3
    Quote from llg
    The American Nurses Association has endorsed it. Use your common sense. If it were as bad for nurses as you fear, why would that organization be endorsing it?
    .


    Well they would wouldn't they? The ANA has been pushing the expansion of AP nurses for ages and this new law funds tons of goddies in that area. They've also been pushing BSN nurses as *better* (for lack of another word) over ADN and diploma nurses. Again IIRC there is plenty in ObamaCare for that as well.

    So on balance if one is a "white coat" wearing nurse that hasn't been near the bedside since Carter or Reagan were in office then yes, there is probably lots to cheer about in this new law. Personally think the jury is still out for the average staff nurse.
    RetRN77, DroogieRN, and VivaLasViejas like this.
  7. 3
    Quote from sauconyrunner
    Many other Countries have policies in place that are similar to the ones endorsed by the new bill. I have received medical care in several of these countries. It was as good as, if not superior to the care I got in the US. (And it was WAY less expensive even when I got care in France as an uninsured person).

    These people you think that will be "added" are already seeking healthcare. They will not be added, they are already there. You can meet many of them at your local Emergency Department, which they use because they can not be seen in a primary doctor office or, especially a specialty physicians office. So very few people will be "added" they might however, get appropriate care for conditions at much earlier times, allowing them to manage them better, and get treatment in a timely manner. Hospitals give away a large percentage of free "Charity care" each year, its a line item in the budget. So these people are already there- and because of limited care we often are paying out huge amts to fix a problem in an advanced stage that could have been fixed at the early stage for less.

    There is not a nursing shortage. I know you may have heard this, but current new graduate nurses are reporting 11-12 month job searches after graduation. So, you will need to really weigh the options. If you are entering the field looking at quick employment and high pay- you might really need to look elsewhere.
    Am sorry, but beg to differ.

    There is a vast swath of the American population that are and will remain uninsured under Obamacare, thus will still be left to cobble together healthcare the best way they know how.

    Illegal immigrants, legal aliens (under certain circumstances), many if not most unemployed, those who do not qualify for Medicaid even under the new *enhanced* rules, the poor and so forth are some that aren't touched by this law.

    The law is basically a huge gift to the entrenched health insurance industry. Those whom are employed and otherwise purchase or will be forced to take on insurance. If household income is within 100% to 130% of the federal poverty line, there is assistance there,otherwise that is where the main benefits end.

    Regarding "inexpensive" healthcare in France, you do know that the government owns mostly all hospitals in France. So in effect nurses and other staff are state employees which means wages and other expenses are government controlled. That goes along way into explaining why the care you received was cheaper than what you may have got in the USA.
    Last edit by DoGoodThenGo on Jun 30, '12 : Reason: Added Content
    RetRN77, murse6464, and DroogieRN like this.
  8. 7
    I did know that in regards to France, I worked for a French Company for quite some time. I really much prefer their system to ours. Even with government controlled wages and rates etc. This does not disturb me, but it does some people.

    Depending on how things go, I do think in the end, the bill will benefit many- and of course it will miss a variety of underserved, and un-served populations. Despite that, I do think it is progress. Would I prefer Universal Health care? Yes, I would.

    My point actually was to the OP that we will not suddenly be seeing a flood of people who did not come to the hospital before...as we are already seeing them.
  9. 0
    If you want to be a NP in a primary care role, I think there will be a demand for that in the future whether this law stays or is repealed. As for nursing in general, who knows!
  10. 0
    There will always be a demand for nursing, and especially for BSN. Since there is more supply then demand, hospitals are getting much pickier than they once where. From my BSN class in SoCal that graduated in Dec. 2010, everyone found hospital employment within six months. I also agree with SC_RNDude regarding NP, that there is going to be a great demand in the near future. With you just starting your prereqs, your looking at 5-6 years down the line at a minimum to get your NPs. I'm going for my NP next fall, I started my prereqs in 2006.

    Might I ask what field do you think would be more stable in 5-6 years? I'm from SoCal, moving to NorCal in August. I work with a traveler from Texas, and she might not go back to Texas because the pay is soo much better here.
  11. 1
    Word of advice; take things one step at a time. Your still taking your prereqs, soo you have a loooong way to go. Put your effort in doing well in those courses, because they are no joke. You might just be a chronic worrier like my wife, but rest assured that there will ALWAYS be a demand for nurses. Those that are having difficulty finding work, are those with too much experience (too expensive) or too little experience (new grad-expensive to train). There's a plethora of jobs for mid-level nurses.
    wetzoo likes this.


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