Nursing Shortge: New Remedies and related links

  1. From Nurse Week.com

    New Remedies
    By Jessica M. Scully
    October 2, 2002

    Little by little, individuals and groups across the country find success with fresh ideas to recruit and retain nurses, as well as to forge long-term solutions to the shortage

    http://www.nurseweek.com/news/featur...0/shortage.asp

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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   frankie
    NRSKarenRN, Frankie here. I would like to believe that hospitals/employers will all or most all institute policies and practices that will encourage retention and maintenance of staff. I do not really believe this will happen - except in a few progress proactive institutions. The nursing shortage is not news to anyone who has been reading anything related to nursing since the 1980. Not much has been done. I see the same stuff now that I saw in 1975. Agency RNs as the solution. Freezes on raises. Hiring freezes. Low raises - last year 2% because the hospital built a new hospital and had to move - thus make employee "pay" for new hospital by limiting raises. I could go on on on on on ophs got stuck. I do not look to the institution for solutions. I have changed over the past 10 years, especially the past 5, and now I contribute what I am able to by the ways I work with other nurses. If I can do one thing each day that makes their job easier, them maybe it will catch on and other nurses will do this too. Actually, of the 6 nurses where I work, 5 of us are this way. When I want a raise, I go to the manager. That is all I can do. One nurse at a time. One day at a time. Sort of that grassroots thing - like babysteps- frankie
  4. by   bewbew
    Here in Australia there is also a nursing shortage........young people straight from school are opting for the IT fields, and any other career that pays more money......and nurses are leaving in droves.
    There is a hospital here in the state of Victoria, that are offering new employees free round the world trips!!

    see: http://todaytonight.com.au/stories/315882.html

    I don't know if this type of thing is happening in the U.S.

    bew
  5. by   llg
    Originally posted by frankie
    NRSKarenRN, Frankie here. ... I have changed over the past 10 years, especially the past 5, and now I contribute what I am able to by the ways I work with other nurses. If I can do one thing each day that makes their job easier, them maybe it will catch on and other nurses will do this too. Actually, of the 6 nurses where I work, 5 of us are this way. When I want a raise, I go to the manager. That is all I can do. One nurse at a time. One day at a time. Sort of that grassroots thing - like babysteps- frankie
    I like that If each of us just tried to help out each other in every-day ways, the world would be a better place. Unfortunately, some people are so burned out that they can't do that anymore. All they seem to be able to do is blame other people for their troubles and do very little to actually help those with whom they have contact every day.

    Keep up the good work,
    llg
  6. by   Glad2behere
    I help peer nurses whenever and however I can. I like the comraderie it fosters and it beats the alternative immensely. I came to realize way back there that all nurses carry an emotional baggage inherent to the work, and they are vulnerable to many unnecessary exacerbations by their mere predisposition.
    I suppose it goes back to being in nursing school and remembering all the times I could have been eaten alive, and someone of more experience gracefully helped and relieved me of my inadequacies.

    Wonderful article and a philosophy worth embracing, thanks for sharing Karen.

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