National Nursing Licensure v. State Licensure for Healthcare Professionals - page 2

by fraziea2 | 10,546 Views | 17 Comments

National nursing licensure promotes more effective licensing than does state licensure by alleviating the ever-present nursing shortage and promoting mobility among the nursing workforce. Some of the many benefits of a national... Read More


  1. 0
    What does has having separate scopes of practice done for us except cause confusion? Especially when it comes to LPNs. This is why nobody really knows exactly what a LPN can do. It varies from state to state.
  2. 2
    Pilot licensing is actually certification in US.

    Pilot licensing and certification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Pilot licensing or certification refers to permits to fly aircraft that are issued by the National Aviation Authority (NAA) in each country, establishing that the holder has met a specific set of knowledge and experience requirements. This includes taking a flying test. The certified pilot can then exercise a specific set of privileges in that nation's airspace. Despite attempts to harmonize the requirements between nations, the differences in certification practices and standards from place to place serve to limit full international validity of the national qualifications. In addition, U.S. pilots are certificated, not licensed, although the word license is still commonly used informally.[1] Legally, pilot certificates can be revoked by administrative action, whereas licensing (e.g., a driver's license) requires intervention by the judiciary system.


    In the United States, pilot certification is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a branch of the Department of Transportation (DOT). A pilot is certified under the authority of Parts 61 and 141 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, also known as the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).[2]

    kabfighter and SummitRN like this.
  3. 0
    Medical Technologists are nationally licensed.
  4. 2
    Quote from DogWmn
    Medical Technologists are nationally licensed.
    They are certified, not licensed.

    Many EMTs and Paramedics are nationally certified by NREMT. However, to practice, they must be state certified. The NREMT certification merely makes it easier to get certified in another state.

    The NREMT exam is much like NCLEX. Nurses have an easier time moving their license between states than do Paramedics.

    By the way, physicians are licensed by states, not nationally.
    herring_RN and NRSKarenRN like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Pilot licensing is actually certification in US.

    This is true. While it is colloquially called a 'pilot's license', it is technically an 'airman certificate'. Mine says 'certificate number' right on it.

    I am not completely on-board with the federal government issuing nursing licenses...this was never an intended function of the federal government (bravo to the poster who mentioned the 10th Amendment). The "we all take the same test" argument doesn't work out well when you consider that each state sets the criteria for didactic and clinical hours for eligibility to take the test. If every state would get together and set the same rules for eligibility to take the NCLEX, then perhaps a nationwide compact would provide the same convenience as a national license without the overstepping of the federal government.
  6. 0
    Quote from kabfighter
    All pilots (including those who fly for a living) are licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration. This license is also recognized internationally by all members of the International Civil Aviation Organization.
    Add broadcast engineers to the list of federally licensed professionals. I still have mine.

    Beyond that, how much more federal control of our lives do we really want?
  7. 0
    Quote from Overland1
    Add broadcast engineers to the list of federally licensed professionals. I still have mine.
    Again, this is dictated by the nature of the profession. Broadcast rules fall under the FCC as, like pilots, electromagnetic waves don't stay within one state (or country or planet) on a fractional second to fractional second basis.

    For virtually every other engineer, registration and licensure falls to individual states even though exams like the FE and the PE are national exams.
  8. 1
    Quote from kabfighter
    If every state would get together and set the same rules for eligibility to take the NCLEX, then perhaps a nationwide compact would provide the same convenience as a national license without the overstepping of the federal government.
    All of the remaining states are free to sign the NLC (Nurse Licensure Compact) if they choose -- they just haven't chosen to do so, and that's their prerogative.

    However, that still would not provide "the same convenience" as a national license -- rather, nursing licenses would work the same as our driver's licenses. The only reason we're able to drive cross-country without having to stop at each state line and apply for a new license is because long ago, in the dawn of the Automobile Age, the states recognized that wasn't going to be practical and all got together and signed a compact (same as the NLC) agreeing to temporarily recognize each other's licenses. However, when you move to a new state, you still have to apply and pay for a driver's license in your new home state. There's no "national" license to drive.
    herring_RN likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top