Men in Nursing/Men in Society - page 2

Hello . . . I came across three articles that piqued my interest due to the recent thread about men in nursing and why some leave. They are more geared towards men in society in general and whether... Read More

  1. by   CRNI
    Stevielynn,
    Very interesting articles. All three written by females. . .

    Dave,
    I have 2 "girly" daughters, but think you have the right idea on raising your sons.

    I agree with the idea that males and females should have equal opportunities, but sameness?? Not possible. JMHO.
  2. by   hbscott
    "Many people do not believe as you do, Morpheus"

    As you have noted the reasons that many leave nursing are gender nuetral so you would think that men in general would not feel so alienated in nursing (I think current literature supports that statement) but society as a whole will often define our roles and responsibilities and it seems that the current culture in America and some other societies don't like men in nursing.

    Perhaps it is because we don't look good in skirts?

  3. by   AMV
    One night I was out with my hubbie and a very good friend of ours , Tim - two tech workers out of work due to all the current lay-offs. They were talking about changing professions due to the bleak outlook for technology. I asked them about nursing - would they ever consider that and why or why not? Our friend, Tim said he might consider another area in healthcare, but probably not nursing. I asked "why". Tim has been our friend for about 7 years and knows what nursing is and isn't about. It is a very challenging profession that isn't for whimps or idiots! He said mainly because of the name "Nurse" and the fact that it is seen as a female profession. My husband agreed. He said it sounded too much like nursing a baby, etc. So I wonder, how many other men out there feel that way? As far as the associations to being gay or a "failed physician" (remember the movie "Meet the Parents"?) I think that is unfortunate. I think our profession would benefit greatly by having more men in it and I wonder how many men out there are not going into a profession they might love because of those stereotypes?

    So I wonder, would Nursing having a "new name" change people's perceptions, or would that take away from the heritage of our profession?
  4. by   hbscott
    It seems that this thread (and others) has touched a nerve.

    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...809#post509809

    -HBS
  5. by   twarlik
    Why is it that when a man is sensitive and well groomed, society feels the need to place a label to them? Because they're not the stereotypical, macho men, we have to label them as "metrosexual." In other words, they're not "normal." It's just stupid. I personally think we could do with more sensitive men
    As for the men in nursing thing: Get over it. Who cares what people think. If someone thinks you became a nurse because you couldn't get into med school, who cares. I was planning on being a musician for many years and then decided to take another path. People thought that it must have been because I wasn't good enough. I was good enough. I just wanted certain things out of my life that being a professional musician couldn't provide. Anyone who makes assumptions about me based on such arbitrary considerations isn't worth my time or effort.
    And the gay thing...Lets just stop that nonsense. How people ever got it into their heads that only gay men become nurses is beyond me. It constantly amazes me that people get so offended if they're thought of as being gay. As if that's the worst thing that you could be called. I also can't help but notice that so many of the straight men on this board constantly feel the need to affirm their heterosexuality by referring to themselves as "real men." I'm a "real man" and I happen to be gay. Gosh, what a concept!
  6. by   hbscott
    "It constantly amazes me that people get so offended if they're thought of as being gay."

    Being thought "gay" does not offend me. Being approached by other men (and women) for sex or sexual favors that is not consensual does offend me - greatly.

    The truth of the matter is I was approached on numerous occasions for sexual liaisons by other men when I was in nursing school and in nursing practice. On one occasion for a job interview sex was solicited in exchange for a favorable recommendation. This is unacceptable.

    I do not condemn the sexual orientation of gay men and women but I do abhor any behavior that denies me my freedom of choice (or yours for that matter) and demeans my personal dignity as I try to live my life and provide for my family.

    -HBS
  7. by   twarlik
    Originally posted by hbscott
    Being thought "gay" does not offend me. Being approached by other men (and women) for sex or sexual favors that is not consensual does offend me - greatly.
    Being upset by unwanted sexual advances is one thing, but that is not what you stated in your original post. Your original post said one of the reasons you left nursing was because of the "negative sterotypes," those being failed physician or homosexual. To me, that said that you were offended by being thought of as a homosexual (or a failed physician).
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Maybe he was offended at the stereotype itself . . offended that people still think of male nurses as gay or failed physicians. Maybe it wasn't "homophobia" or "failed-physicianophobia". He did protest both stereotypes.

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Aug 11, '03
  9. by   hbscott
    Being upset by unwanted sexual advances is one thing, but that is not what you stated in your original post. Your original post said one of the reasons you left nursing was because of the "negative sterotypes," those being failed physician or homosexual. To me, that said that you were offended by being thought of as a homosexual (or a failed physician).

    It has been my experience that being thought "gay" has encouraged unwanted sexual advances (this has been my experience) and being thought a "failed physician" has created socially awkward situations difficult at best to manage when trying to raise a family who must deal with such labels thrust at their father and husband.

    I can understand how you might interpret my remarks to be disparaging to the gay community but if you read my words more closely perhaps you will see what I am trying to say.

    -HBS
  10. by   AMV
    Sometimes there isn't just one point of view that is right. I'm not a guy, but I could understand a straight guy being upset by advances wrongly made and being stereotyped by something he is not (how would you feel if you were a woman in a male dominated profession, and all your co workers and the people you worked for were convinced you were either a lesbian or some sort of "He woman" and you were continually portrayed in the media, etc as just that - no one wants to be seen as something they are not!). I could also understand someone who is gay hating the fact that people look at the gay stereotypes in that it makes being gay seem like something bad or is made fun of. So what if someone is gay and is a nurse? There are gay men in every profession.

    My feeling is, that if there were MORE MEN in nursing and maybe even the name "NURSE" were changed to something more gender neutral, these stereotypes might being to fade. Or maybe it's not the name, just the fact that so many in our profession are women.... who knows?

    Whatever we do, nursing needs to have an image that people see as professional. I really feel that the average person has extreme misconceptions as to what nursing is all about. WE know what we do and we know what respect we all deserve - the general public needs to have that perception as well.
  11. by   live4today
    If women who are doctors or becoming doctors don't mind being called "Doctor" ...why should men mind being called "Nurse"?

    I like working with nurses who are males. They don't bytch as much as women, or gossip about everybody behind their back like a lot of female nurses do.
  12. by   Dplear
    My post was for real and that is the way I am raising my kids. I do not mind being called Nurse. It does not offend me in the least. As for being straight or gay that is just sexual preference. It has nothing to do with being manly or not. I know gays that are effeminate and I know straights that are effeminate. I also have a biker buddy that does construction and weighs 300+ pounds and I have seen him clear out a bar fighting. He is gay. he has had the same partner for 15 years and his partner is the same way. Is he manly. DAMN STARIGHT he is. he has taught me a few things about construction and I have even taught him about nursing. Metrosexualism has nothing to do with orientation it has to do with gender identifacation.

    I also do not get offended when people come on to me sexually. I actaully take it as a compliment. If that person is attracted to me then I ,ust be doing something right. I have been approached by both men and women but I turn them down. I have been happily married for 16 years now and I am straight. Does not bother me though when a guy comes on to me. It is not like I am going to go home with him.

    Dave
  13. by   hbscott
    When this thread first started it was about how men's roles are defined by society and how that may relate to men leaving nursing. If you recall I stated that I left nursing for many different reasons to include:


    "I left nursing for a job that paid more, had better hours, provided better working conditions, and offered me a brighter future."

    "I left nursing because I grew weary of the passive aggressive behavior I witnessed daily in nursing practice as nurses turned on each other for one reason or another."

    Etc.,

    There was one sentence that referred to the typical male nurse stereotypes that annoyed me so and yet this one area caused so much response, well it just reminds me why nursing can be so frustrating for me personally and professionally.

    I feel that there were more important issues raised on why I (and others) left nursing yet there are some who felt that the gay community was being attacked by certain remarks (I still don't agree that my remarks were disparging to gays or other groups).

    I say they forget what the real issue was all about, why men are leaving or not attracted to the nursing profession. As a former nurse educator I would have to respond that some of you fine people went off topic.

    What is up with that?



    -HBS

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