Laws re: mobbing/bullying?

  1. What laws cover nurses who work in hostile workplaces and endure mobbing?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   HarryPotter
    As far as I kknow, there are no "laws", but there are policies against mobbing/bulying.Check out web sites re: workplace bullying. In terms of "enduring" a hostile workplace, that u don't have to do. Document problems/events, take them up the chain of command, know that u are someone who deserves respect and don't pt up with hostility!
  4. by   sanctuary
    Quote from misscus
    What laws cover nurses who work in hostile workplaces and endure mobbing?
    I am unfamiliar with the term "mobbing." Can you clarify?
  5. by   jenruth
    Unfortunately, every workplace has a few or more troublemakers. There are laws regarding a "hostile" workplaces or work environments. Without knowing the specifics of your situation, I would suggest you first review your employer's policies. Most employee handbooks describe practices or behaviors which are unacceptable at work. An employee should be able to carry out their duties without fear, threats, etc.. If your supervisor or Human Resource Dept. can't or won't assist you, don't just go away quietly! Speak with an attorney familiar with employee law. He or she will advise you on how to proceed. You can also contact the National Labor Relations Board. (In the phone book under U.S., Federal Govt.)


    Quote from misscus
    What laws cover nurses who work in hostile workplaces and endure mobbing?
  6. by   RN4MERCY
    Quote from sanctuary
    I am unfamiliar with the term "mobbing." Can you clarify?
    I believe "Mobbing" is a major reason that nurses leave hospital practice. Anyone who has raised valid questions to shared governance shams, and encroachment on nursing practice by unlicensed aides, and resisted drinking the Kool-Aid to become a workforce redesigned Stepford Nurse will recognize the disease. An important book has been written titled, MOBBING: Emotional Abuse in the American Workplace (Davenport, Schwartz, Elliott). It identifies 10 key factors of the mobbing syndrome: 1. Assaults on the dignity, integrity, credibility, and professional competence of the employees. 2. Negative, humiliating, intimidating, abusive, malevolent, and controlling communication. 3. Committed directly, or indirectly, in subtle or obvious ways. 4. Perpetrated by one or more staff members--"vulturing." 5. Occuring in a continual, multiple, and systematic fashion, over some time. 6. Portraying the victimized person as being at fault. 7. Engineered to discredit, confuse, intimidate, isolate, and force the person into submission. 8. Committed with the intent to force the person out. 9. Representing the removal from the workplace as the victim's choice. 10. Not recognized, misinterpreted, ignored, tolerated, encouraged, or even instigated by the management of the organization.

    "Until evil is named, it cannot be addressed!"
  7. by   sanctuary
    Quote from RN4MERCY
    I believe "Mobbing" is a major reason that nurses leave hospital practice. Anyone who has raised valid questions to shared governance shams, and encroachment on nursing practice by unlicensed aides, and resisted drinking the Kool-Aid to become a workforce redesigned Stepford Nurse will recognize the disease. An important book has been written titled, MOBBING: Emotional Abuse in the American Workplace (Davenport, Schwartz, Elliott). It identifies 10 key factors of the mobbing syndrome: 1. Assaults on the dignity, integrity, credibility, and professional competence of the employees. 2. Negative, humiliating, intimidating, abusive, malevolent, and controlling communication. 3. Committed directly, or indirectly, in subtle or obvious ways. 4. Perpetrated by one or more staff members--"vulturing." 5. Occuring in a continual, multiple, and systematic fashion, over some time. 6. Portraying the victimized person as being at fault. 7. Engineered to discredit, confuse, intimidate, isolate, and force the person into submission. 8. Committed with the intent to force the person out. 9. Representing the removal from the workplace as the victim's choice. 10. Not recognized, misinterpreted, ignored, tolerated, encouraged, or even instigated by the management of the organization.

    "Until evil is named, it cannot be addressed!"
    Wow, I did not know that there was a name for the stuff that those of us who tend to be persistant in our standards live through. I have been written up for wearing a lab coat on the floor while teaching Nursing Assistant students, for talking about unconcious predjudice in a Cultural Competency class, and for fighting the use of handcuffs in a psych hospital. I have been repremanded for refusing to put a patient in restraints for rolling around on the floor, etc. Did not know that being targeted for a greater lever of criticism was other than business as usual for an out lesbian. Thanks for the source as well. Need to read that book.
  8. by   GingerSue
    Quote from jenruth
    Unfortunately, every workplace has a few or more troublemakers. There are laws regarding a "hostile" workplaces or work environments. Without knowing the specifics of your situation, I would suggest you first review your employer's policies. Most employee handbooks describe practices or behaviors which are unacceptable at work. An employee should be able to carry out their duties without fear, threats, etc.. If your supervisor or Human Resource Dept. can't or won't assist you, don't just go away quietly! Speak with an attorney familiar with employee law. He or she will advise you on how to proceed. You can also contact the National Labor Relations Board. (In the phone book under U.S., Federal Govt.)

    Those are good ideas above.
    But what does a person do when working for a small company that doesn't have a human resources? I can tell you that I have been within this atmosphere and it can be ugly - not knowing how the owner might react if he/she knows how certain of their "star" employees are unnecessarily harassing other employees. I have seen one staff just burst into tears from harassment by co-workers - this was at the end of the day, outside in the parking lot - so at that time I suggested - if planning to say anything to the guy then call me/us and we'll be witnesses.
  9. by   RN4MERCY
    Quote from GingerSue
    Those are good ideas above.
    But what does a person do when working for a small company that doesn't have a human resources? I can tell you that I have been within this atmosphere and it can be ugly - not knowing how the owner might react if he/she knows how certain of their "star" employees are unnecessarily harassing other employees. I have seen one staff just burst into tears from harassment by co-workers - this was at the end of the day, outside in the parking lot - so at that time I suggested - if planning to say anything to the guy then call me/us and we'll be witnesses.
    I feel your pain! Good strategy, and I suggest the victim keep a journal of dates and times. My experience with HR is that they support management. Sad, but true, but often the best strategy is to get out of the line of sight of the bully by transferring to another company or change jobs, especially if the bully is empowered by management. Well meaning friends are privately supportive but usually do not want to draw attention to themselves by showing "public support." Hostile work environment and "constructive discharge" complaints require substantial documentation. Even then, a good labor attorney told me, "yeah, they're after you." My doctor put me on stress leave for 10 days. After that I changed jobs and as I think back, I wonder what took me so long. Work shouldn't hurt! If it's any consolation, bullys often attack popular, well-liked and competent people. It's not about you; it's about their own poor self esteem and narcissism. Don't let them steal your joy, and don't go into their den alone!

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