Landmark JAMA study finds nurses to be autonomous, skilled; nation reels

  1. found this excellent research article on the center for nursing advocacy. it's timely and well-written. go to the site for the article in its entirety.

    april 1, 2005 -- registered nurses are autonomous professionals with years of college-level training, and their clinical skills are critical to patient outcomes, according to researchers writing in this week's journal of the american medical association . the massive study "nursing: who knew?" was based on extensive research by physicians at the harvard and johns hopkins medical schools.


    for the "who knew?" project, physicians did field work in hospital locations ranging from so-called "nurses' stations" to the more rarely seen "patients' rooms." they also conducted the first detailed interviews with the recently discovered "nursing scholars" and "nurse practitioners." among the key findings were that nursing was a distinct science, that many nurses had graduate degrees in nursing, that most nurses had no particular wish to be or to date physicians, and that nurses performed critical health tasks long thought to be the sole province of physicians.


    in perhaps the study's most shocking conclusion, researchers found that hospital nurses did not serve or report to physicians, but to nurse managers in a separate line of command reaching to hospital leadership. "that was the killer," admitted principal investigator jeffrey kimbrow, m.d., reached at his cambridge office, echoing the comments of physicians nationwide. "we had to run the data over and over, because no one could believe it."

    full story: http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/news/news.html



    :hatparty: april fools!!! :hatparty:
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Apr 1, '05
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   lee1
    Quote from angie o'plasty, rn
    found this excellent research article on the center for nursing advocacy. it's timely and well-written. go to the site for the article in its entirety.

    april 1, 2005 -- registered nurses are autonomous professionals with years of college-level training, and their clinical skills are critical to patient outcomes, according to researchers writing in this week's journal of the american medical association . the massive study "nursing: who knew?" was based on extensive research by physicians at the harvard and johns hopkins medical schools.


    for the "who knew?" project, physicians did field work in hospital locations ranging from so-called "nurses' stations" to the more rarely seen "patients' rooms." they also conducted the first detailed interviews with the recently discovered "nursing scholars" and "nurse practitioners." among the key findings were that nursing was a distinct science, that many nurses had graduate degrees in nursing, that most nurses had no particular wish to be or to date physicians, and that nurses performed critical health tasks long thought to be the sole province of physicians.


    in perhaps the study's most shocking conclusion, researchers found that hospital nurses did not serve or report to physicians, but to nurse managers in a separate line of command reaching to hospital leadership. "that was the killer," admitted principal investigator jeffrey kimbrow, m.d., reached at his cambridge office, echoing the comments of physicians nationwide. "we had to run the data over and over, because no one could believe it."

    full story: http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/news/news.html



    :hatparty: april fools!!! :hatparty:
    unfortunately it was an april's fool. this is the time we need real attention to our issues and a bigger "voice"
    at first i took this as reality and had hope------too good to be true
  4. by   UM Review RN
    Relax, Lee, there IS hope!

    The Internet has made instant connectedness available to nurses through this site and through the above piece's original site, The Center for Nursing Advocacy.

    With nurses networking via the Internet, we've entered a New Age and it could mean positive changes for nurses everywhere.
  5. by   rnmi2004
    Thanks for the laugh, Angie!

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