I'm supposed to wear an "Ask me if I washed my hands!" button?! - page 32

Today, administrators launched a handwashing campaign, part of which includes having patient care staff wear giant buttons that say, "Ask me if I washed my hands!" Patients are encouraged to ask... Read More

  1. by   Chico David RN
    Quote from crb613
    I might wear one that says....ask me are you short staffed today?
    did you get to take a lunch break in order to have the stamina to care for me?
    how long has it been since a bathroom break?
    do you have the supplies you need to perform your job?
    how many people are you providing care for in addition to me?
    That last one is esecially valid. In fact during the fight for the California ratio law, we encouraged patients to ask that very question.
  2. by   osumb73
    I'm an Infection Preventionist, and I am very dismayed at the reactions that I have seen here. Lots of fingerpointing in the other direction, not stopping to remember that when you do that, 3 fingers are pointing back at you!!!!!!!! You can only be responsible for your own actions, and it sure sounds like you aren't!

    I wonder if you get as upset when one of your patients develops MRSA, VRE, Cdiff, or one of the other nasty bugs???? How about a central line related blood stream infection or ventilator associated pneumonia, because you could not be bothered to wash your hands????

    Instead of partnering with your Infection Prevention and Control Department to make sure that your patients are safe from both resident and transient bacteria that you carry on your hands, you sit there and complain about everyone else. What a bunch of negative people! Maybe if you encouraged your patients to ask this question, it might just get through to the doctors also! A study in England showed that patients were afraid to ask their doctors and nurses about the most basic of safety actions: hand hygiene? Why? They feared retaliation!!! What does that say about the care that you give??

    Also, all of you saying that you learned this in nursing school...I will go one further...you learned it in kindergarten, and yet you still do not practice it 100% of the time? What does that say about your personal integrity as both a person and a nurse? Don't tell me that you do, because I do hand hygiene observations every day, and know that this is not a fact! The national average of hand hygiene being performed before patient care is only about 45% and after is only about 60%. Yet you touch keyboards, telephones, and charts, alll of which are extremely difficut to clean, and yet think nothing about touching a patient or passing a medication without cleaning your hands! I want the patients to ask you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    SO PULLLLEEEEZZZEEEE, don't ***** about a catchy slogan or campaign to try to increase awareness until you can PROVE to your Infection Preventionist that you are 100% compliant before, during and after patient care 100% of the time. Partner with us, instead of ******** about what we are trying to accomplish. Think up another catchy slogan if you don't like this one. Help us develop a campaign to keep patients safe. If you don't, you have no reason to *****!
  3. by   PsychRNMsz
    Although I do agree with you about the importance of Patient safety, I feel that a hospital actually budgeting funds on such a campaign is wrong. The hospital I am currently doing clinical rotations in has a similar slogan. They have also taken it one step further to place hand sanitizers in each room...none of which are in the same location. You are constantly trying to find these sanitizers upon entering the room and leaving... not to mention the heavy doors that you must open to get back out, and there is a "fire hazard" as to putting the sanitizers in the hall way. They employ people to walk around the floors "at random" to catch you walking out of a room either using the sanitizer or not. It is almost always the case where you are asked another question as you are trying to push 2 pieces of equipment out of the room with your foot, a puffy little wad of sanitizer in one hand and your MAR's under your other arm which is trying to open the door... I am 100% WASHING my hands before patient care and 100% using the sanitizer when I do not actually touch a patient, but this method and campaign are even causing my patients to question what I am doing with all of the sanitizer and the items. Maybe they can start putting blood pressure cuffs, thermometers, and stethoscopes in all rooms so we are not dragging those around either...maybe that will reduce infections (it seems to work wonders with peds and neonates)
  4. by   sbic56
    All great suggestions MIZZ...the problem with hospital policies and campaigns like these is they never seem to ask the people who could truly help put an effective policy in place...the nurses!
  5. by   PsychRNMsz
    I totally agree, the nurses and the aides should be the ones involved in the policy making, not some board who received 3 complaints of [probably] physicians not washing their hands when they entered the room (I HAVE SEEN SEVERAL START PATIENT CARE WITH OUT WASHING THEIR HANDS OR USING SANITIZER)
  6. by   Straydandelion
    Partnering in patient safety and prevention of infection and NOT pointing fingers is one issue. However I doubt if ANY nurse working in a patient care area had any say on wearing such a button and yes, I would think it is demeaning. Not the button itself, but the words, and I also am of the opinion getting a sick patient to attempt to ask health professionals if they have washed their hands is silly. We are suppose to be taking care of, educating, calming their fears...this button would have the opposite effect.
  7. by   Iam46yearsold
    I always wash my hands, I dont feel anything wrong with this at all.
  8. by   PsychRNMsz
    Last Thursday, the environmental services crew were coming out of a room, grabbed the sanitizer and said very loudly ... "I AM WASHING MY HANDS"...
  9. by   RedWeasel
    Quote from osumb73
    I'm an Infection Preventionist, and I am very dismayed at the reactions that I have seen here. Lots of fingerpointing in the other direction, not stopping to remember that when you do that, 3 fingers are pointing back at you!!!!!!!! You can only be responsible for your own actions, and it sure sounds like you aren't!

    I wonder if you get as upset when one of your patients develops MRSA, VRE, Cdiff, or one of the other nasty bugs???? How about a central line related blood stream infection or ventilator associated pneumonia, because you could not be bothered to wash your hands????

    Instead of partnering with your Infection Prevention and Control Department to make sure that your patients are safe from both resident and transient bacteria that you carry on your hands, you sit there and complain about everyone else. What a bunch of negative people! Maybe if you encouraged your patients to ask this question, it might just get through to the doctors also! A study in England showed that patients were afraid to ask their doctors and nurses about the most basic of safety actions: hand hygiene? Why? They feared retaliation!!! What does that say about the care that you give??

    Also, all of you saying that you learned this in nursing school...I will go one further...you learned it in kindergarten, and yet you still do not practice it 100% of the time? What does that say about your personal integrity as both a person and a nurse? Don't tell me that you do, because I do hand hygiene observations every day, and know that this is not a fact! The national average of hand hygiene being performed before patient care is only about 45% and after is only about 60%. Yet you touch keyboards, telephones, and charts, alll of which are extremely difficut to clean, and yet think nothing about touching a patient or passing a medication without cleaning your hands! I want the patients to ask you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    SO PULLLLEEEEZZZEEEE, don't ***** about a catchy slogan or campaign to try to increase awareness until you can PROVE to your Infection Preventionist that you are 100% compliant before, during and after patient care 100% of the time. Partner with us, instead of ******** about what we are trying to accomplish. Think up another catchy slogan if you don't like this one. Help us develop a campaign to keep patients safe. If you don't, you have no reason to *****!
    Okay I am going to have to respond to this. We aren't discussing the reason for the buttons, we are discussing how the buttons make us feel. Your whole, article, on preventing infection is missing the whole point of this thread. Sorry. The reason our facility wants us to wear buttons is because then they can advertise in the community that they are on the 'forefront of handwashing promotion' to prevent infection. I agree staff don't always wash their hands. I do. In and Out of rooms. Before and After and In-between procedures. But this promotes distrust where there may not have been any before. How can patients respect us and continue to consider nursing as the most honest and trusted profession when they see us with buttons such as this. If I was a patient I would think, hmmm they must have a problem with that....should I be concerned? (yes of course) but I wouldn't like to see my nurse with a stupid button that makes me think I have to remind her to do such a basic thing. Do you think they are going to trust us with the pills and needles full of medicine we bring in? HMMM how sure am I you prepared those correctly if I have to even remind you to wash your hands. This is NOT about pts getting VRE -That is not the point here, in this thread. There is cause and effect. This thread is not about the cause (buttons to prevent infection) it is about the effect (buttons that create doubt in our profession at the most basic level).
    Last edit by RedWeasel on Mar 3, '09 : Reason: wordy-well still is...
  10. by   RedWeasel
    nevermind
    Last edit by RedWeasel on Mar 3, '09 : Reason: nevermind
  11. by   pannie
    As someone who is disfigured and lost 6 months of my life from MRSA, you can bet I'll be watching! What should have been a straight, perhaps fading surgical scar is now something very ugly.
    I really don't care about your ego. It seems the point of dispute is having to wear a button. Big deal. I wear this every day of my life. But make no mistake, I'm grateful I have that life! A button? ptttf!
    This whole thread reminds me of children saying "But he/she doesn't have to do it."
    I thank the infection control people who have spoken up, given statistics and tried to put it in perspective.

    I've given up on allnurses (but get e-mails because I posted on this thread a long time ago). To me, most have bruised egos. THIS IS OVER A BUTTON, for crying out loud!
  12. by   RedWeasel
    I am sorry not an ego thing. If we are to get other young people into nursing it does have an impact on the respect and dignity of our profession. We wash our hands. And I will not get over it. And really they need to campaign to get family and visitors to wash their hands. They let their little kids play on the floor for crying out loud. Or they let them sit on the bed with the patient. The same kid who just got off the elevator where they touched all the buttons etc. where all the patients have been. The elevators seriously need to be scrubbed or sprayed down every hour.
  13. by   RedWeasel
    Otherwise it will be pretty hard to find nurses to help you out in ten years time. Do you want me to get some statistics on that?

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