I'm supposed to wear an "Ask me if I washed my hands!" button?! - page 17

Today, administrators launched a handwashing campaign, part of which includes having patient care staff wear giant buttons that say, "Ask me if I washed my hands!" Patients are encouraged to ask... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Good luck proving where it precisely came from.
  2. by   lpnstudentin2010
    Nurses at the hospital I go to wash their hands in the room infront of the patient. then you dont have to ask
  3. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Good luck proving where it precisely came from.
    All I have to prove is that I got the infection while I was a patient. And if you know anything about lawsuits, you name everyone, everyone that came near you. Nurses should stop bellyaching about some dumb button and get on those-physicians included-who they observe not washing their hands before touching a patient and upon leaving. They should be carrying on about everyone they see who does not wash their hands. It shouldn't be an issue left up to the infection control nurse or administration. And a patient or his/her family should not be placed in the position or role of monitoring their care givers hand washing. Apprently not everyone, nurses and physicians included, are washing their hands, give the rate of nosomcial infections.

    Grannynurse
  4. by   fergus51
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    All I have to prove is that I got the infection while I was a patient. And if you know anything about lawsuits, you name everyone, everyone that came near you. Nurses should stop bellyaching about some dumb button and get on those-physicians included-who they observe not washing their hands before touching a patient and upon leaving. They should be carrying on about everyone they see who does not wash their hands. It shouldn't be an issue left up to the infection control nurse or administration. And a patient or his/her family should not be placed in the position or role of monitoring their care givers hand washing. Apprently not everyone, nurses and physicians included, are washing their hands, give the rate of nosomcial infections.

    Grannynurse
    You know what? We are extremely infection control minded in our unit and still, infections happen. I don't have control over every single person in the hospital and unfortunately it would take perfection to guarantee no infections. We don't need insulting buttons to get us to wash our hands. It makes me sad to think that you would name me in a lawsuit regardless of MY behavior, but I guess that's the way people do things. Not that it matters since I'll never be your nurse, but I still think it's sad.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Well, let's think of it this way: the button is just one more surface for germs to live on.:stone:
  6. by   caroladybelle
    I get really tired of the old "I'm going to sue" mentality.

    Perhaps we should be able to force all of the patients to abstain from germy behavior, ban all flowers, ban all home food, ban all visitors, ban all home clothing, ban everything that makes the patient feeling comfortable and at home....because we cannot control the germ content.

    Perhaps the hospital should be permitted to quarentine everyone without ABX/antipyrtics for the required 2-5 days (before blood cultures come back) before we admit them. That way we will not be blamed for any errant germs that may have been there to begin with. Why treat them prophylactically...you might get sued over something that was not diagnosed at admission?

    Or we can give every single patient a massive dose of multiple antibiotics that kill off every form of bacteria (even the "helpful" ones), so that the patient has massive continued diarrhea and yeast, but so that we won't be blamed for errant bacteria.

    I have had medicine make some errors in my care...but I have chosen to teach hospitals about errors (by using my issue) rather than sue. Because lawsuits can provide the impetus for overkill...such as nurses not being able to do chemstix/fecal occults, because of the issue that they might be colorblind. It makes medicine way too cumbersome/expensive for the average person to afford it.

    There are mistakes worth suing over and there are ones that we need to accept personal responsibility for and those that are a matter of life and living it.
  7. by   EinnOgTveir
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I have had medicine make some errors in my care...but I have chosen to teach hospitals about errors (by using my issue) rather than sue. Because lawsuits can provide the impetus for overkill...such as nurses not being able to do chemstix/fecal occults, because of the issue that they might be colorblind. It makes medicine way too cumbersome/expensive for the average person to afford it.
    That's really comendable.
  8. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I get really tired of the old "I'm going to sue" mentality.

    Perhaps we should be able to force all of the patients to abstain from germy behavior, ban all flowers, ban all home food, ban all visitors, ban all home clothing, ban everything that makes the patient feeling comfortable and at home....because we cannot control the germ content.

    Perhaps the hospital should be permitted to quarentine everyone without ABX/antipyrtics for the required 2-5 days (before blood cultures come back) before we admit them. That way we will not be blamed for any errant germs that may have been there to begin with. Why treat them prophylactically...you might get sued over something that was not diagnosed at admission?

    Or we can give every single patient a massive dose of multiple antibiotics that kill off every form of bacteria (even the "helpful" ones), so that the patient has massive continued diarrhea and yeast, but so that we won't be blamed for errant bacteria.

    I have had medicine make some errors in my care...but I have chosen to teach hospitals about errors (by using my issue) rather than sue. Because lawsuits can provide the impetus for overkill...such as nurses not being able to do chemstix/fecal occults, because of the issue that they might be colorblind. It makes medicine way too cumbersome/expensive for the average person to afford it.

    There are mistakes worth suing over and there are ones that we need to accept personal responsibility for and those that are a matter of life and living it.

    For your information, I was named twice in a lawsuit. So, I know what it is like to be named and I do not take filing a lawsuit lightly. But if it takes a lawsuit to get everyones attention, I will file one. It is still my right, as an American. Taking personal responsibility, yes and it is too bad more nurses and otther healthcare professionals do not take it. Or ensure that their peers take it. Your take on corrective action is a gross misrepresentation of the necessary steps that would prevent many infections. Some chose to ignore that and focus on an administrative attempt to take spme type of action. I suggest some refocus their on their own peers.

    Grannynurse
  9. by   BamaBound2bRN
    Wow, has this thread gone on forever..........what's the big deal about wearing a stinking button. The button, or the patients asking if I washed my hands, or brushed my teeth, or wiped my a** today doesn't make me any less professional. My grandmother had an expression......"throw a rock into a pack of dogs and the one that yelps loudest is the one you hit" boy is there a lot of yelping going on over this tiny insignificant issue.
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from BamaBound2bRN
    Wow, has this thread gone on forever..........what's the big deal about wearing a stinking button. The button, or the patients asking if I washed my hands, or brushed my teeth, or wiped my a** today doesn't make me any less professional. My grandmother had an expression......"throw a rock into a pack of dogs and the one that yelps loudest is the one you hit" boy is there a lot of yelping going on over this tiny insignificant issue.
    The whole point of the thread is that maybe, just maybe, it'd be nice here and there to find managers/administrators that didn't believe in throwing rocks into packs of nurses quite so readily.

    I've been hit by enough rocks over the years to know it's better to yell the loudest BEFORE the next one strikes you upside the head. The difference between me and a dog is that I can see that this rock is just one of a volley - and I can calculate the odds of how many times I'm going to be hit and decry the rock fight in the first place.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 26, '05
  11. by   UM Review RN
    Grannynurse, what I seem to be hearing from you is, so what if it's embarrassing, it's true that nurses need to wash hands more, so get over the humiliation because the patients come first.

    But there is another way, one that thank god, won't push even more nurses away from the bedside.

    Our facility has successfully instituted a handwashing promotion program that does not belittle or degrade nurses (and only nurses). We keep our dignity, we don't have to wear stupid (fomite-attracting) buttons, and patients are taught to be proactive with handwashing for themselves, visitors, and ALL staff.

    Nurses are the educators here, teaching patients on admission about the importance of handwashing for EVERYONE--doctors, lab techs, CNAs, everyone. They are then shown the handwashing stations, and told about the alcohol gels that we use that are considered effective as well.

    So I'm here to tell you: Handwashing promotion can be done without treating nurses (and only nurses) like morons.


    My point: no one needs to be treated badly by management in order to promote a vital procedure.
  12. by   jen42
    You can also teach the patients to ask. I worked in a bone marrow transplant unit where the WBC counts went down to zero. We washed our hands before and after leaving patient rooms. But we also told the patients to question ANYONE who didn't wash their hands before coming in, no matter who it was. I was there once when a patient said to the attending, "Did you wash your hands?" He laughed and admitted he had forgotten, and went off and washed them. This obviously only works for conscious patients, but teaching patients to advocate for themselves works wonders.
  13. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Grannynurse, what I seem to be hearing from you is, so what if it's embarrassing, it's true that nurses need to wash hands more, so get over the humiliation because the patients come first.

    But there is another way, one that thank god, won't push even more nurses away from the bedside.

    Our facility has successfully instituted a handwashing promotion program that does not belittle or degrade nurses (and only nurses). We keep our dignity, we don't have to wear stupid (fomite-attracting) buttons, and patients are taught to be proactive with handwashing for themselves, visitors, and ALL staff.

    Nurses are the educators here, teaching patients on admission about the importance of handwashing for EVERYONE--doctors, lab techs, CNAs, everyone. They are then shown the handwashing stations, and told about the alcohol gels that we use that are considered effective as well.

    So I'm here to tell you: Handwashing promotion can be done without treating nurses (and only nurses) like morons.


    My point: no one needs to be treated badly by management in order to promote a vital procedure.
    Being treated or feeling like one is being treated as a moron is one's own preception. I do not believe that wearing such a button makes me any less of a nurse. One cannot be treated as a moron unless one allows themself to feel they are a moron. I agree that the handwashing campaign should involve everyone. And if one group must wear such a button, so should every other group. I can think of several other things that would make me feel that the administration was treating me unfairly and poorly, then wearing a button.

    Perhaps I have a unique preception because I have experience as a nurse, an administrative assistant and a patient. And I could relate some hair raising incidents I have observed as a patient.

    Grannynurse

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