I'm supposed to wear an "Ask me if I washed my hands!" button?! - page 13

Today, administrators launched a handwashing campaign, part of which includes having patient care staff wear giant buttons that say, "Ask me if I washed my hands!" Patients are encouraged to ask... Read More

  1. by   Grace Oz
    Quote from er-rn2
    we were given these pins too. basically everyone threw them away. maybe they should use the money spent on these pins on actually hiring more staff, or better equipment. plus how many of your patients actually wash their hands....
    the patients aren't trained professionals and being paid to care for the sick!!
    every healthcare provider should wash their hands, regardless! no excuses. we all know the drill.
    however, having to wear a badge????? get real!! i left kindergarden a long long time ago. t.h.a.n.k. y.o.u. v.e.r.y. m.u.c.h!!!
  2. by   bsnrnoh
    One more idea for a button

    I am a NURSE, that means I am here to save your ***, not kiss it.

    Hope I don't offend anyone with this.
  3. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Maybe we should try 'Washing to the Oldies'

    'One o'clock, Two o'clock, Three o'clock, WASH
    Four o'clock, five o'clock, six o'clock, WASH
    7 o'clock, 8 o'clock, 9 o'clock, WASH
    we're gonna WASH, WASH around the sink tonight
    we're gonna WASH WASH WASH until the dawn's daylight
    we're WASHING around the sink tonight.'

    I'm sure some consulting firm could pay enough to hire Potsy to do the video.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    How come the hospital can afford to spend this much money for this c***, but they can't afford raises, equipment, staff, etc.,
    Because to use the money for staff, equipment, raises, etc. would make perfect sense.
  5. by   DusktilDawn
    [QUOTE=hipab4hands]
    Quote from erdiane
    Not to change the subject from handwashing, but back to the button thing............

    We were given buttons a few years back and told we had to wear them. They said BMG with a red circle around and red slash thru the letters.

    We were told they stood for 'no Bi**hin', moanin', or groanin' " They hired a company to come up with this. The same company came up with the idea to make a fake train engine out of cardboard and had the directors of all the different departments urging us to all "get on board!" They had little conductor hats on. My reaction?.....what the ? what are they talking about?!
    ----
    How come the hospital can afford to spend this much money for this c***, but they can't afford raises, equipment, staff, etc.,
    Our lovely administration spends up to $50,000 a a year on a "Morality survey. Each year they get back the same answers, but they do not make any effort to improve conditions that have been listed in the survey.
    Morality surveys are the proverbial pat on the head to say: "We care, really we do (NOT, unspoken NOT here)."
    BMG, when asked by patients were you expected to explain what the B stood for? Cardboard train with conductor? Did your facility hire the "Looney Toon Consultant Corporation" by chance.

    cotjockey: Our latest and greatest scheme is...while we are washing our hands, we are to say..."I am washing my hands an das soon as I am done, I will help you with what you need." We also have to say, "I closed the door to provide your privacy while I help you." That, along with asking the patient their name and birthdate every time we go in the room...I'm going to be so busy remembering all of that, I might forget to do whatever I am going in the room to do!

    I understand the name and birthdate thing before we give meds, do procedures, etc, but once I've done it, I doubt that the patient is going to change rooms just to mess with my mind...once I have verified their identity with the questions and checking their name band, we should be good to go.

    The handwashing and door closing thing apparently came from some patient complaints...now, even though they can see us washing our hands and see that the door is claosed, we have to follow the script, to remeind them that we are washing our hands and closing the door...sigh.
    I find the "script" thing you've mentioned very demeaning and would be insulted if it was suggested where I work. Funny how they don't want us to tell our patients what our nurse patient ratios are or whether we're short staffed.
  6. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    ...

    'One o'clock, Two o'clock, Three o'clock, WASH
    Four o'clock, five o'clock, six o'clock, WASH
    7 o'clock, 8 o'clock, 9 o'clock, WASH
    we're gonna WASH, WASH around the sink tonight
    we're gonna WASH WASH WASH until the dawn's daylight
    we're WASHING around the sink tonight.'

    ...
    Hahahahaha!

    Tim -- I thought those were the lyrics to "WASH 'Round the Clock"???
  7. by   nursemaa
    [QUOTE=DusktilDawn]
    Quote from hipab4hands
    I find the "script" thing you've mentioned very demeaning and would be insulted if it was suggested where I work. Funny how they don't want us to tell our patients what our nurse patient ratios are or whether we're short staffed.
    Scripting can actually be useful in some cases. For instance, using the phrase "how may I help you" instead of "what do you need" sounds a little more caring. Reminding the patient that you care about their privacy, or that you're washing your hands before caring for them reassures them that you really do care about these things. And asking if there's anything else you can do before you leave also lets them know you care. Saying "Let me check on that" sounds alot better than "I don't know". And having some scripted phrases to use when patients and families are upset lets you handle the situation more calmly. So it's not always bad.

    Just my opinion...
  8. by   Havin' A Party!
    (... Double post... )
    Last edit by Havin' A Party! on Oct 8, '05
  9. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Because to use the money for staff, equipment, raises, etc. would make perfect sense.
    Amazingly funny! Have heard this so often! So true too.

    Let's also not forget: "If we give more money to nurses, it'll only serve to establish a really bad precedent."
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    [QUOTE=nursemaa]
    Quote from DusktilDawn

    Scripting can actually be useful in some cases. For instance, using the phrase "how may I help you" instead of "what do you need" sounds a little more caring. Reminding the patient that you care about their privacy, or that you're washing your hands before caring for them reassures them that you really do care about these things. And asking if there's anything else you can do before you leave also lets them know you care. Saying "Let me check on that" sounds alot better than "I don't know". And having some scripted phrases to use when patients and families are upset lets you handle the situation more calmly. So it's not always bad.

    Just my opinion...
    I'm all for options.

    If you want to point out to me why these things could be helpful, to the extent that I find them helpful, I'd give strong consideration to implement them into my practice.

    But telling me that I "MUST" implement them is the surest way to ensure that I won't give them another thought except to go out of my way NOT to use them.

    Why?

    If you want to treat me like a child, well, I can certainly act like one - at least when it comes to management.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  11. by   sbic56
    [QUOTE=ZASHAGALKA]
    Quote from nursemaa
    I'm all for options.

    If you want to point out to me why these things could be helpful, to the extent that I find them helpful, I'd give strong consideration to implement them into my practice.

    But telling me that I "MUST" implement them is the surest way to ensure that I won't give them another thought except to go out of my way NOT to use them.

    Why?

    If you want to treat me like a child, well, I can certainly act like one - at least when it comes to management.

    I love your answer to the scripting thing...it can be good if you choose to use a phrase here and there that works for you, but to management: please don't try to program us! I understand how to speak tactfully and choose my words well all by myself. If someone needs to work on their communication skills, speak to them.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  12. by   sbic56
    Well, Timothy...seems something ate my words upon submission, thus the blank post. What the gist of it was, is that I am totally with you on this scripting thing!! No programming necessary!
  13. by   DusktilDawn
    [QUOTE=nursemaa]
    Quote from DusktilDawn

    Scripting can actually be useful in some cases. For instance, using the phrase "how may I help you" instead of "what do you need" sounds a little more caring. Reminding the patient that you care about their privacy, or that you're washing your hands before caring for them reassures them that you really do care about these things. And asking if there's anything else you can do before you leave also lets them know you care. Saying "Let me check on that" sounds alot better than "I don't know". And having some scripted phrases to use when patients and families are upset lets you handle the situation more calmly. So it's not always bad.

    Just my opinion...
    It's one thing to educate on better communication, which I am not against. I'm also not against education on how to deescalate situations that may occur, in fact I think there is a need for this one. I agree "May I help you?" sounds alot better than "What do you need?" as does "Let me check on that" opposed to "I don't know." There's more to communication than words, our tone/volume of voice and our body language for example. Depending on how you communicate, "May I help you?" can even come across as rude. There's a difference between providing a useful inservice on communication and mandating scripted responses. Scripted phrases can also sound phoney if it's been heard one too many times by patients and their families. Implementing a script and attempting to program people to parrot statements is demeaning to staff.

    BTW I do respect your opinion on the subject Nursemaa.

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