Healthcare is NOT a basic human right. - page 35

If one were to read the Constitution one would realize that the Constitution does not grant anyone freedoms, liberties, or rights. The Constitution only protects freedoms, liberties, and rights from... Read More

  1. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    2
    Quote from mc3
    I don't want to buy my car insurance from the government, either.

    I have in the past. Much simpler and cheaper all around. Especially those hard hit new drivers. My son was quoted $6500 for six months for a six year old family sedan. His crime he's 21yo, never had an accident nor a ticket of any sort.

    One province over and he'd be under $2000 for the year.
    lindarn and joanna73 like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  lindarn profile page
    0
    But you are still required to have it, aren't you? And I wil be that you carry it.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
  4. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Well if one examines how other nations go about universal healthcare it is part and parcel of a scheme that works from the notion there is a basic social level that no person should fall below. This includes housing, food, education and yes access to quality healthcare services.

    Merely providing someone with health insurance is not going to keep them healthy if they cannot afford a proper diet for themselves and their families. Ditto if they are living in unsanitary and or unhealthy living conditions or no "home" at all (homeless).

    We know that stress takes a huge toll on the human body in both mental and physical health. Giving a homeless or very poor person health insurance whilst still allowing them to live under a bridge is hardly a good use of funds.

    When doing a discharge plan do you not inquire about the patient's home situation? Do they have insurance to pay for meds? Can they have the proper diet to not only aid recovery but promote proper health?
    Furthermore to that:

    Have been watching the BBC series "Call The Midwife" on local PBS which is based upon factual accounts of a *real* UK midwife in 1950's UK, and it becomes clear why just having universal insurance doesn't cure all health problems.

    Video: Call the Midwife - Episode 1 | Watch Call the Midwife Online | PBS Video

    The NHS was just a decade or so old in the 1950's UK, borne out of the dust and ruin of WWII, and while it made great strides in healthcare for many in Great Britain, especially the poor, children and infants, it soon became clear to the government that more was going to have to be done and a "expansion" of social welfare programs was required.

    PHysicans, midwives, district nurses and other healthcare workers under the NHS system did their best but when you have persons living in filthy, disease and vermin ridden conditions it really is like trying to stop a flood with a bucket.

    As with most things and as it had been for generations before it was mainly the women and children who suffered the most. The former were worn out physically and often mentally from having baby after baby. Coal fires meant many children had breathing problems, that along with mould and god only knows what else growing on walls and such.
    lindarn likes this.
  5. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    3
    You really don't have much of an understanding of your British history do you?

    Post WWII, Britain was a mess. Rationing was still in effect until the mid-50's. The War had devasted people, their homes were often in ruins. Working women were displaced by returning troops. Add in a large population and a small land mass you are going to have problems. Factor in the programme is set in the east end of London and of course you are seeing the worst of the UK in this time period.

    I was born at the end of the decade in a maternity hospital. My parents didn't live in conditions detailed in this series.

    Untill 9-11's terrorist attacks, America had never experinced mass suffering and destruction on home soil.

    Don't base all your opinions on a PBS series.
    Sisyphus, lindarn, and joanna73 like this.
  6. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from Fiona59
    You really don't have much of an understanding of your British history do you?

    Post WWII, Britain was a mess. Rationing was still in effect until the mid-50's. The War had devasted people, their homes were often in ruins. Working women were displaced by returning troops. Add in a large population and a small land mass you are going to have problems. Factor in the programme is set in the east end of London and of course you are seeing the worst of the UK in this time period.

    I was born at the end of the decade in a maternity hospital. My parents didn't live in conditions detailed in this series.

    Untill 9-11's terrorist attacks, America had never experinced mass suffering and destruction on home soil.

    Don't base all your opinions on a PBS series.
    Fair enough "zing", and yes one should have made clear the series is set in the EastEnd and did not obviously represent a majority of the UK population. This probably explains much of the *shocked* attitude the new young midwife has towards the area, it's residents and the state of the place,as she obviously came from better and was totally unware "people lived like this", as she says.

    Being as all that may still stand by my statements that merely providing healthcare and or means to access is not going to bring about large changes in the health of a population if other needs are going wanting.
  7. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    2
    There are many issues that need to be addressed. Allowing someone access to health care and social services is a start. Remember that many people have jobs, and they cannot afford to pay their insurance costs. No one should be forced to decide between buying food or going to the Doctor. That's just wrong.
    lindarn and JMBnurse like this.
  8. Visit  mc3 profile page
    0
    Quote from suanniam4
    mc3
    Pt wasn't homebound and shouldn't be on service.
    Sounds like your hha wasn't legit.
    I know! When I questioned it, that's when I was told "no, it's OK". That's about when I quit.
    mc3
  9. Visit  withasmilelpn profile page
    6
    From http://articles.cnn.com/2009-06-05/h...e?_s=PM:HEALTH

    "Unless you're a Warren Buffett or Bill Gates, you're one illness away from financial ruin in this country," says lead author Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., of the Harvard Medical School, in Cambridge, Mass. "If an illness is long enough and expensive enough, private insurance offers very little protection against medical bankruptcy, and that's the major finding in our study."
    Woolhandler and her colleagues surveyed a random sample of 2,314 people who filed for bankruptcy in early 2007, looked at their court records, and then interviewed more than 1,000 of them. Health.com: Expert advice on getting health insurance and affordable care for chronic pain
    They concluded that 62.1 percent of the bankruptcies were medically related because the individuals either had more than $5,000 (or 10 percent of their pretax income) in medical bills, mortgaged their home to pay for medical bills, or lost significant income due to an illness. On average, medically bankrupt families had $17,943 in out-of-pocket expenses, including $26,971 for those who lacked insurance and $17,749 who had insurance at some point.
    Overall, three-quarters of the people with a medically-related bankruptcy had health insurance, they say.
    "That was actually the predominant problem in patients in our study -- 78 percent of them had health insurance, but many of them were bankrupted anyway because there were gaps in their coverage like co-payments and deductibles and uncovered services," says Woolhandler. "Other people had private insurance but got so sick that they lost their job and lost their insurance"

    How is this ok?
    RNfaster, Sisyphus, RNsRWe, and 3 others like this.
  10. Visit  lindarn profile page
    2
    IT's NOT!!

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    Sisyphus and JMBnurse like this.
  11. Visit  withasmilelpn profile page
    4
    From http://articles.cnn.com/2009-06-05/h...e?_s=PM:HEALTH

    Medical bills prompt more than 60 percent of U.S. bankruptcies


    "Unless you're a Warren Buffett or Bill Gates, you're one illness away from financial ruin in this country," says lead author Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., of the Harvard Medical School, in Cambridge, Mass. "If an illness is long enough and expensive enough, private insurance offers very little protection against medical bankruptcy, and that's the major finding in our study."
    Woolhandler and her colleagues surveyed a random sample of 2,314 people who filed for bankruptcy in early 2007, looked at their court records, and then interviewed more than 1,000 of them. Health.com: Expert advice on getting health insurance and affordable care for chronic pain
    They concluded that 62.1 percent of the bankruptcies were medically related because the individuals either had more than $5,000 (or 10 percent of their pretax income) in medical bills, mortgaged their home to pay for medical bills, or lost significant income due to an illness. On average, medically bankrupt families had $17,943 in out-of-pocket expenses, including $26,971 for those who lacked insurance and $17,749 who had insurance at some point.
    Overall, three-quarters of the people with a medically-related bankruptcy had health insurance, they say.
    "That was actually the predominant problem in patients in our study -- 78 percent of them had health insurance, but many of them were bankrupted anyway because there were gaps in their coverage like co-payments and deductibles and uncovered services," says Woolhandler. "Other people had private insurance but got so sick that they lost their job and lost their insurance." Health.com: Where the money goes -- A breast cancer donation guide


    How is this ok?
    VanLpn, lindarn, joanna73, and 1 other like this.
  12. Visit  FMF Corpsman profile page
    6
    What I find particularly nauseating are those cases, even after the policyholder has paid their premiums for years and years, the insurance companies are able, no, justified in declining the claim, and then cancelling the policy of certain policyholders who are suffering from terminal diseases or catastrophic injuries. This just doesn’t somehow seem right, yet it happens all of time.
    RNfaster, lindarn, joanna73, and 3 others like this.
  13. Visit  withasmilelpn profile page
    4
    Quote from realmaninuniform
    "And in our land, we have the 'right' to free speech. Don't trample on 37 degree's rights because you don't agree with him. I for one don't care if he's a janitor. What he has to say is interesting, just as this debate is interesting. What you think is as valid as him and this is an important topic to all. It needs to be discussed - respectfully please."

    I'm all for free speech, and if it "janitor" wants to speak his opinion he can do so. A forum for nurses is probably not the best choice. I'm sure there's plenty of janitor boards out there.

    It all comes down to credibility, especially within the healthcare field. I wouldn't go to a janitorial board and say that we need a federal takeover of janitorial duties, and I sure wouldn't pretend to be one and or dodge the question.

    Illustrating someone's credibility or lack there of is not trampling on free speech. Let's try to stay relevant here. Just think about it... Would you take a janitor's advice on what you as a nurse should do with your own health care? I don't think so.
    The part I object to the most is -' the name of "research"? Take your propaganda somewhere else comrade. It's not welcome here in the land of the free, and home of the brave!"'

    And yes - I would discuss any issue with any educated person regardless of their job title. My husband himself was once a chauffeur after being laid off again - now he owns his own very successful company. We've been in the position of paying for Cobra, no insurance for us and CHIP for our kids, using clinics for care when we couldn't use our insurance because we were 'out of network' in another state. I've had Aetna, IBC, keystone, POS, etc etc and 3 jobs at one time to make needs met for us. Now my husband is providing health insurance for others. I think you'd be surprised who might know a thing or two about healthcare. Furthermore, lots of non nurses post here all the time.
    Sisyphus, RNsRWe, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  RNfaster profile page
    5
    I think we should consider healthcare a human right and address it in our society. I think to not do so sets the stage for continued negative outcomes, including rights abuses. I think it's also a humane thing to do...

    I know a couple (female lower 40s, male late 30s) with ability and means to pay outrageous health insuance rates but that were recently denied (they were on COBRA at the time - no breaks in insurance). One had seen a rheumatologist over the years for rheumatoid-like syndrome (but not rheumatoid arthritis as there was no joint damage). Neither were on prescription drugs. They were unable to get insurance. They had recently started their own small business (less than 15 employees, I think), so they initiated insurance through it for themselves and their employees. If they had not had this option, they would have been up a creek. They were surprised that most of their employees took the insurance (I think only one opted out).

    Something they noted - insurance rates for a young woman is much higher than for a young man of same age. Insurance rates for older employees are also much higher. (They examined the rates for all the workers and set a rate according to their particular pool of workers, but also noted that they were paying a large percentage of it.) With such a system (that we have in place today), I could see how some companies might avoid hiring women or older workers to avoid higher premiums. I never really thought of that before. I think if we had universal coverage, it would help eliminate some discrimination that surely goes on (against women and older workers per higher insurance costs).

    This couple is for Obamacare.
    Hoozdo, Sisyphus, lindarn, and 2 others like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top