Health Care Reform will lower premiums...

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    GCTMT and herring_RN like this.
  2. 6 Comments so far...

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    Late last night, the Congressional Budget Office released its initial analysis of the health-care reform plan that Republican Minority Leader John Boehner offered as a substitute to the Democratic legislation. CBO begins with the baseline estimate that 17 percent of legal, non-elderly residents won't have health-care insurance in 2010. In 2019, after 10 years of the Republican plan, CBO estimates that ...17 percent of legal, non-elderly residents won't have health-care insurance. The Republican alternative will have helped 3 million people secure coverage, which is barely keeping up with population growth. Compare that to the Democratic bill, which covers 36 million more people and cuts the uninsured population to 4 percent.

    But maybe, you say, the Republican bill does a really good job cutting costs. According to CBO, the GOP's alternative will shave $68 billion off the deficit in the next 10 years. The Democrats, CBO says, will slice $104 billion off the deficit.

    The Democratic bill, in other words, covers 12 times as many people and saves $36 billion more than the Republican plan.
    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/ezr...office_th.html

    Put your hands on my health care please...:>>
    GCTMT and herring_RN like this.
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    They didn't actually have a plan. It was nothing more than saying, "look at us, we care about health care too".

    Too little.. tooo late I'm afraid.
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    Quote from HM2VikingRN
    Link embedded.

    Have you spoken with the people of Massachusetts lately?
    Katie82 likes this.
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    The study is linked by the OP....
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    Quote from Onekidneynurse
    Have you spoken with the people of Massachusetts lately?
    The problem (one of many, I should say) with the MA plan is that they didn't go with a public plan, it's all through the private insurance companies.
    tewdles and GCTMT like this.
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    I have heard arguments on both sides of this issue. As I see it, the public option could go one of two ways: either the competition from the public option could cause premiums to decrease or insurance plans could chuck it all, allow themselves to be driven out of business and branch out to making big bucks administering the public option under a government contract like BC/BS does for Medicare now....
    GCTMT likes this.


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