Controversial Michael Moore Flick 'Sicko' Will Compare U.S. Health Care with Cuba's - page 67

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  1. by   HannitizeYou
    Quote from HM2Viking
    The difference between socialized medicine and single payer is this:

    Socialized medicine means that drs, nurses etc are all employees of government.

    single payer means that there is a single payment source. Hospitals, clinics etc are independent and in competition with each other.
    Considering we live in America and last time I checked, America is a capitalist country, the free market system should continue to be applied to the current health care model. Not everyone in America wants to wait 6 months to get an MRI like they do in Canada, England and Germany.

    Sean
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    I was "fully insured" by PacifiCare. Waiting for authorizations had me wait exactly six weeks for an MRI. It was a total of 11 weekd befor they authorized the physical therapy that finally helped.
    That is 11 weeks I was disabled instead of working my full time night shift in the ICU. Taxpayers supported me on state disability.

    WELCOME TO ALLNURSES.COM!

    What field of nursing are you in?
  3. by   HannitizeYou
    Quote from spacenurse
    I was "fully insured" by PacifiCare. Waiting for authorizations had me wait exactly six weeks for an MRI. It was a total of 11 weekd befor they authorized the physical therapy that finally helped.
    That is 11 weeks I was disabled instead of working my full time night shift in the ICU. Taxpayers supported me on state disability.

    WELCOME TO ALLNURSES.COM!

    What field of nursing are you in?
    Hmm -- 6 weeks is better than 6 months in my opinion. When I hurt my knee last year, I had an MRI within 2 days of my injury. My insurance is blue cross blue shield, blue care. The day of the injury I stayed while the nurse called blue cross to get the pre-cert, once the pre-cert was given I called around to local MRI centers to find out when the fastest available appointment could be granted. Like I said, two days post injury the MRI was completed and fully paid for. This required some proactivity on my part, in other words, I didn't sit around and wait for everyone to do everything for me, because most people are lazy in my opinion. I dont know what happenned in your particular situation but maybe you should try to be more pro-active and not blame everything on private insurers, at the same time somehow believing if government comes in and takes over all of these problems will magically disappear. Just my opinion. Oh and by the way, I am a nurse anesthetist.

    Sean.
  4. by   HannitizeYou
    Quote from spacenurse
    I was "fully insured" by PacifiCare. Waiting for authorizations had me wait exactly six weeks for an MRI. It was a total of 11 weekd befor they authorized the physical therapy that finally helped.
    That is 11 weeks I was disabled instead of working my full time night shift in the ICU. Taxpayers supported me on state disability.

    WELCOME TO ALLNURSES.COM!

    What field of nursing are you in?
    Additionally something that might help in the future if you ever become injured, you should try to be more pro-active with your care. For instance, going to the library and reading books about your specific injury might enable you to empower yourself to actually engage in therapeutic activity in the home environment rather than waiting around for a physical therapist to tell you what exercises to do. You can even get some self help therapeutics, hot packs, ice, analgesics are readily available and with a little self directed learning you would be surprised what the body is capable of accomplishing.

    Sean
  5. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from hannitizeyou
    considering we live in america and last time i checked, america is a capitalist country, the free market system should continue to be applied to the current health care model. not everyone in america wants to wait 6 months to get an mri like they do in canada, england and germany.

    sean
    absolutely a myth. see http://pnhp.org/facts/myths_memes.pdf

    • there are now more than 45 million americans without health insurance,
    in itself an important key to adequate access to care (8).
    • almost 60 million americans lack health insurance at some point during
    the year (9).
    • about 20 million american families, representing 43 million people, had
    trouble paying medical bills in 2003; many had trouble gaining access to
    health care and paying for other basic necessities—rent, mortgage payments,
    transportation, or food (10).
    • twenty percent of the uninsured cannot afford health insurance even if offered
    by their employers (11).
    • about two-thirds of the uninsured have no regular physician and have costrelated
    barriers to physician visits, prescription drugs, and necessary care (12).
    • about one-half of the non-elderly u.s. population earn less than $50,000 a
    year, and have major problems in affording health care (13).
    • in 32 states, a parent working full-time at a minimum wage of $5.15 an hour
    is ineligible for medicaid and cannot afford health insurance (14).
    americans with above-average incomes have more access problems than patients in canada, the united kingdom, australia, and new zealand
    (figure 1) (15).

    • overcrowding of emergency rooms in canada is increasingly mirrored by the same problem in the united states, though underreported in this country. physicians at the los angeles county–usc medical center have testified that some emergency room patients can wait up to four days for a bed and that others may die before receiving care (17). of the millions of americans crowding u.s. emergency rooms, many have problems that could have been prevented by earlier care; they end up being charged the highest rates for emergency care, then are released with often inadequate follow-up care (18).
    • though admittedly the canadian system is underfunded, and extended waits for some elective services may be a problem in some parts of the country, these problems are often exaggerated by its detractors based on unreliable self-reported data. in 1998, fewer than 1 percent of canadians were on waiting lists, with fewer than 10 percent of these waiting longer than four months
    (19). waiting times in the united states, even for the privately insured, are now increasing for checkups as well as for sick visits (20).


    comprehensive and reliable provincial databases on waiting times show that in recent years, waiting times have decreased while services have increased.
    for example, coronary bypass surgery increased by 66 percent between 1991 and 1997 in manitoba, while waiting times were reduced for that procedure and also shortened for five other elective procedures—carotid endarterectomy, cholecystectomy, hernia repair, tonsillectomy, and transurethral resection of the prostate (21).


    accessed 8/25/07.
    Last edit by HM2VikingRN on Aug 25, '07
  6. by   HM2VikingRN
    a dose of reality aboout drug innovation:

    even though r&d costs of many drugs developed in the united states
    are funded in large part by federal tax monies through basic research by the national institutes of health, drug manufacturers exaggerate their own r&d expenditures, claiming that about $800 million are expended to bring a new drug to market (77). studies by public citizen’s health research group put that figure closer to $110 million (78).
    and
    fifty-seven percent of the more important new drugs are discovered by
    r&d in other countries and later marketed in the united states (81). the european federation of pharmaceutical industries, despite the presence of price controls in their countries, spent $47 billion on r&d in 2002, about 50 percent more than r&d spending by u.s. drug manufacturers (82, 83).
    source: http://pnhp.org/facts/myths_memes.pdf accessed 8/25/07.


  7. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from HannitizeYou
    Additionally something that might help in the future if you ever become injured, you should try to be more pro-active with your care. For instance, going to the library and reading books about your specific injury might enable you to empower yourself to actually engage in therapeutic activity in the home environment rather than waiting around for a physical therapist to tell you what exercises to do. You can even get some self help therapeutics, hot packs, ice, analgesics are readily available and with a little self directed learning you would be surprised what the body is capable of accomplishing.

    Sean
    I think that this post is less than helpful in advancing the discussion of how to improve access to health care. I respect the skills and knowledge of my colleagues in their ability to care for their own injuries and illnesses.



    Profit ahead of people leads to poor health care results.
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from HannitizeYou
    Additionally something that might help in the future if you ever become injured, you should try to be more pro-active with your care. For instance, going to the library and reading books about your specific injury might enable you to empower yourself to actually engage in therapeutic activity in the home environment rather than waiting around for a physical therapist to tell you what exercises to do. You can even get some self help therapeutics, hot packs, ice, analgesics are readily available and with a little self directed learning you would be surprised what the body is capable of accomplishing.

    Sean
    Thank you for the advice.

    I think I should follow the instructions of the physicians rather than treat an injury myself. But my family practice and orthopedic physicians instructed my not to move to a position that caused the pain to increase.
    I did not know what my specific injury was and neither did they.

    An in line skater came down a hill, couldn't stop, and knocked over a concrete bench. I turned my bicycle to avoid being hit but my arm was stopped by the bench less than a second before he hit it. I ended up face down in the sand while my arm remained behind.

    That was in 1994. My shoulder was injured. At that time I did research shoulder injuries at the UCLA medical library. Thought it could be a rotator cuff injury but it was not.
    I did use ice at first and took ibuprofen. My MD and the personnel lady at my hospital told me that 2 weeks is usual for approval to see a specialist. I continued working.
    After the 2 weeks I had an authorization for the orthopedic physician. I got an appointment in a week. He X-rayed it, ordered the MRI, and put me on disability because I could neither move my arm nor think clearly due to the pain.
    Then I waited 2 weeks for authorization.
    One week for the MRI. I then had to get my primary physician to do more paperwork for authorization for followup with the orthopod.
    AFTER I carried the MRI request to the MD and got an appointment PT was ordered.
    I do not think I know enough to bypass a professional. My MD wanted me to have 12 sessions over 4 weeks but only 4 were authorized.
    That was enough because I did the excercises several times a day, improving rapidly.

    In 2000 I had the same symptoms on the other side. My primary Doc was going to put in for authorization but I told her I would pay myself to avoid waiting 2 weeks for authorization.
    She the recommended a different shoulder specialist who did X-rays and got me started on PT the same day. I never missed a nights work.
    Of course it was a different injury probably caused by favoring the shoulder that was injured first.

    I am sorry to be so dumb. I somehow though that since I already paid for the care I would get it. Silly me.

    Now I have "the Blues" premier. So far no problem. I needed a lumpectomy a few years ago and with Blue Cross, Blue Shield there was no wait. Hope to be so fortunate should the need arise.

    PS: When I had my recent colonoscopy I chose to pay an extra $150.00 for a CRNA to administer propofol rather than the conscious sedation usually used. I had a dedicated anesthesia professional instead of an RN who could be expected to assist the GI Doc instead of continuously monitoring my oxygen saturation, cardiac rate and rhythm, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and level of consciousness.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Aug 26, '07
  9. by   BBFRN
    Quote from HannitizeYou
    This required some proactivity on my part, in other words, I didn't sit around and wait for everyone to do everything for me, because most people are lazy in my opinion. I dont know what happenned in your particular situation but maybe you should try to be more pro-active and not blame everything on private insurers, at the same time somehow believing if government comes in and takes over all of these problems will magically disappear. Just my opinion. Oh and by the way, I am a nurse anesthetist.

    Sean.
    Most nurses are proactive in their care.

    You should blame the insurance company, if it is a private company with services that you are paying for. We expect quality of care in the hospital, and we should expect quality of care from our insurance companies. Capitalism is a great thing- it would be great if we were offered more choices from our employers, but we are not. Therefore, that limits our ability to shop around.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 26, '07 : Reason: edited.
  10. by   teeituptom
    Quote from spacenurse
    I was "fully insured" by PacifiCare. Waiting for authorizations had me wait exactly six weeks for an MRI. It was a total of 11 weekd befor they authorized the physical therapy that finally helped.
    That is 11 weeks I was disabled instead of working my full time night shift in the ICU. Taxpayers supported me on state disability.

    WELCOME TO ALLNURSES.COM!

    What field of nursing are you in?
    At least your getting Disability

    My sister in Fla is still waiting for tests and disability, All they do is keep pumping her full of Narcs.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from teeituptom
    At least your getting Disability

    My sister in Fla is still waiting for tests and disability, All they do is keep pumping her full of Narcs.
    I am sorry for what your sister is going through.
    I was on disability in 1994. We in California have a small amount deducted from every paycheck for state disability insurance SDI).
    I received a check for about 1/3 what I earned working full time nights. I had the option of using sick time to supplement that up to my regular pay without overtime.

    There was no problem getting the SDI. As soon as my MD filled out the paper I took it to the state office. Three days later I got the first check.

    I wish Florida had the same.
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from HannitizeYou
    Hmm -- 6 weeks is better than 6 months in my opinion. When I hurt my knee last year, I had an MRI within 2 days of my injury. My insurance is blue cross blue shield, blue care. The day of the injury I stayed while the nurse called blue cross to get the pre-cert, once the pre-cert was given I called around to local MRI centers to find out when the fastest available appointment could be granted. Like I said, two days post injury the MRI was completed and fully paid for. This required some proactivity on my part, in other words, I didn't sit around and wait for everyone to do everything for me, because most people are lazy in my opinion. I dont know what happenned in your particular situation but maybe you should try to be more pro-active and not blame everything on private insurers, at the same time somehow believing if government comes in and takes over all of these problems will magically disappear. Just my opinion. Oh and by the way, I am a nurse anesthetist.

    Sean.
    In 1994 PacifiCare always took ten business days to authorize a specialist or a test. There was NO calling around because I had to use my hospitals MRI only and inpatients went first.

    In my post I did not blame. Just told what happened to me.
    I certainly did not type that I believe in magic.
  13. by   HannitizeYou
    Quote from HM2Viking
    I think that this post is less than helpful in advancing the discussion of how to improve access to health care. I respect the skills and knowledge of my colleagues in their ability to care for their own injuries and illnesses.



    Profit ahead of people leads to poor health care results.
    --- --- --- --- --- ---
    Last edit by HannitizeYou on Aug 26, '07

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