A Call to Action from the Nationís Nurses in the Wake of Newtown - page 4

Reposting from PSNA Communications email. Karen A Call to Action from the Nationís Nurses in the Wake of Newtown More Than 30 Nursing Organizations Call for Action in Wake of Newtown Tragedy (12/20/12) Like the rest... Read More

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    I had read before about the % of nurses who are members of ANA and UAN but couldn't remember so went to look it up and found this:



    In the News: The Top Nursing Story of 2008: Why Can't Nurses Just Get Along?


    So who represents nurses? The once-venerable ANA appears to be fighting for its life. Between last June and December, nurses associations in three states-Hawaii, Michigan, and Minnesota-withdrew from the ANA, citing political and financial differences. California's, Maine's, and Massachusetts's had already withdrawn. In 1954, 44% of all licensed U.S. RNs belonged to the ANA; today, 6%, more or less, are members (the ANA Web site cites several membership figures ranging from 150,000 to 200,000 of the nation's 2.9 million RNs; it also says that an additional 250,000 nurses belong to ANA affiliate organizations, but that number may not take into account the recent defections). The ANA questioned the legality of the state associations' disaffiliations in an October 2008 press release and stated that it remains the "only professional organization to ensure the collective voice of all RNs has national power
    Nursing Center - Journal Article
    janhetherington likes this.

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    Nurse Karen, What about sending that ppetition to the DHS and NIH?
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    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    I agree with RESTORING the The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act and the Federal Assault Weapons Ban which was in place in the 1990's like NRSKarenRN.

    Basically there are copy cats on the street since it expired and one was used in Colorado last summer. Not good!!!!
    It was nothing but a feel good "ban". Nothing was actually banned. At no time during the time the law was in force were the "banned" weapons or magazines not readily available at local sporting goods shops. It was a "ban" in name only and useless.
    janhetherington and Spidey's mom like this.
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    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    As a member, they speak on my behalf. Don't see how nurses could not agree with:

    Ban assault weapons and enact other meaningful gun control reforms to protect society

    No of course you don't see how nurses wouldn't agree with you. The goal is present those of us who disagree as unreasonable. Well I am not unreasonable and I very much disagree. I know that banning certain firearms based purely on cosmetic apperance as the 1994 law did simply is not effective for anything.
    SoldierNurse22, tewdles, tntrn, and 6 others like this.
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    Quote from Spidey's mom
    I had read before about the % of nurses who are members of ANA and UAN but couldn't remember so went to look it up and found this:



    In the News: The Top Nursing Story of 2008: Why Can't Nurses Just Get Along?





    Nursing Center - Journal Article
    I never looking into it but I always assumed the ANA was an anti-nurse organization made up of people who disliked nurses. I based this assumption based on their press releases and the things they advocate for.
    janhetherington and KeyMaster like this.
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    I'm taking a break from making Christmas cookies so here are my thoughts. Let me preface them by saying that I do not own a firearm and have only fired a friend's weapon at a target range. I have limited knowledge of firearms except that firing a glock made me feel like I dislocated my shoulder. I realize that gun ownership is a constitutional right, and I have no objections to anyone owning a musket and making their own ammunition for them. This was the weapon available when the second ammendment was signed.

    People with mental health issues have been around forever. Why are we seeing these problems now? I think that the answer is two fold. First, the general attitude of society is rude an very nasty. I don't have to give examples of this, they are all around us. Secondly, it is so very difficult to get someone commited and medicated if they do not want to be. I don't remember these mass killings before the commitment laws where changed and mental institutions were colosed.
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    Quote from Laurie52

    People with mental health issues have been around forever. Why are we seeing these problems now? .
    This is what my husband and I have been discussing. I'm interested in figuring out what is different now.

    He grew up in a rural area where kids learned to shoot and hunt from a young age. Teens who could drive often left home early to get in some hunting before heading to school and pickups were parked in school parking lots with shotguns in the gun rack in the back window. Guns were easily available in the 1950's and 1960's and yet, school shootings were not common.

    I grew up 4 years behind him and in So. Cal but firearms were part of my childhood as well.

    What has changed in society that makes people go off the deep end and do things like Adam Lanzo did last week?

    I don't think access to guns is the reason . . . because access to guns has gotten harder than when my husband and I grew up.

    What has changed?
    Wile E Coyote and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    Quote from Laurie52
    I realize that gun ownership is a constitutional right, and I have no objections to anyone owning a musket and making their own ammunition for them. This was the weapon available when the second ammendment was signed.
    I liked this comment because of this sentence!

    We are not talking about little small muskets we are talking about massive killing machines!
    We do not these out on the streets and I read IndiCRNA's comment that it didn't do anything. Over the summer around the time of the Colorado shooting I talked to someone who said the item used was basically the same he used when in the military, but just SLIGHTLY different. He strongly was for this ban of these massive killing machines!!
    We need these gone!

    (Merry Christmas and God Bless)
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    I owe many of you an apology. When i said "no child" you are right I left out the word unsupervised. That was what I meant. I encouraged my DGS to learn how to shoot. One of his parent's friends have a son who was shot in the head by a friend playing with a gun. i felt he needed to learn appropriate use of guns.

    I read how most people who have guns have education but that is not really true. Yes, hunter safety is great. But it does not teach many things that someone who is using a gun as personal protection needs to know. i took the CCW course. I know what is included. i also know most people I ran into at the range had never taken a course. Unless they were military they learned from someone else. I am not saying they were bad, I am saying they were allowed as are many others who have guns without proper understanding of them.

    My DSis used to be the Town Justice. During hunting season her court room was filled with people who were carrying loaded weapons in their cars. Totally illegal. When she would ask why, an answer she got more than once was " _________ loaded it before I left the city. I don't know how to load it exactly". I wish I had made this up. Not every gun owner is as conscientious as the people who are responding here. i respect those who respect guns and their good and bad points.
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    Marion Wright Edelman sums it up better than I

    Marian Wright Edelman: It Is Time to Act to Protect Children Against Gun Violence


    Right now the pervasive culture of violence in America only reinforces the sense of threat both children and adults feel. This year's Black Friday shopping set a record for gun sales: The FBI reported 154,873 requests for background checks from shoppers wanting to buy guns on the day after Thanksgiving alone. Those numbers are not about what many people think of as the "criminal" gun culture involving guns bought and sold on the streets. These are the guns being sold to the millions of Americans who are willing and able to go through background checks and follow all existing laws and proper legal channels so that they can either buy guns for their own pleasure or their own theoretical protection. It appears the Newtown shooter's mother fell into this very large category of Americans. There were 16.8 million background checks in 2012, nearly double the number 10 years ago. What is it about American culture that encourages tens of millions of Americans to either use guns as a form of entertainment or feel so fearful they believe they need guns in their homes, including semiautomatic weapons and high-capacity ammunition clips designed specifically to kill large numbers of other people, to feel a sense of safety?

    Why are we so terrified of one other, even during periods when actual crime rates go down? There is an obvious connection between that feeling of terror and the culture of violence that saturates Americans in violent language, violent imagery, and violent entertainment. Right now, instead of responding as parents and a nation by saying no to the culture of violence, we are apparently responding by defensively arming ourselves with more and bigger weapons. If that cycle of violence and fear is having such a deep psychological impact on adults, how do we expect our children to navigate or survive it?

    The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence reports a gun in the home is more likely to be used in a homicide, suicide, or unintentional shooting than it is to be used in self-defense, and other studies have found guns in a home are more likely to kill or injure a family member or friend than a stranger. Guns lethalize anger and despair. Gun owners who know these facts seem to either discredit the research behind them or hold to the belief their own guns and families would certainly be the exception. If the Newtown shooter's mother knew those risks she likely felt the same way. In fact, if her son had only used her guns to kill her or kill himself, it would have been an outcome that would never have been national news. Instead, the weapons she apparently chose to buy and bring into her home were used to kill her, her child, and 26 other people who were all somebody else's mother, child, or both.
    pattyjo, Mollypita, and herring_RN like this.


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