Blackballed? (Sorry, lengthy)

  1. This is beginning to sound fishy to me. A recruiter just called about a position I put in for through a transfer where I currently work in a non-nursing position. This hospital is the only one in this city. I have been there for three years. Took a break from nursing for personal reasons.

    I have interviewed for several positions in the past year because I am ready to return to nursing. I have been out for about 5 years. My specialty is OB.

    Today, I was told that I didn't qualify for the position because I don't have recent experience and the unit is now very strict in what they are looking for. But the recruiter also told me that in the last two years, they have hired 6 new grads in this position!

    I have met with managers and have been open about my reasons for stepping out of nursing for awhile. All have been receptive. I had interviewed for 3 different positions in the last year. One was offered to me in Orthopedics (no experience per jost description), but then rescinded because I did not have experience in that area!

    Meanwhile, I have secured a position in my specialty at another hospital in another city. They did not have a problem with my being out of nursing. I even completed orientation in half the time. This hospital reported being impressed with my skills.

    The problem is, I have to commute one hour away from where I live. I took the position to prove that I have not lost any of my skills. The other problem with this job is that it pays about $9.00 less than what my own city hospital pays.

    My city hospital wants me to take a nurse refresher course and then work Med/Surg. But the recruiter told me that she has many nurses on Med/Surg looking to transfer into positions and that they are not able to do that due to their lack of experience in the areas that they are looking to transfer to.

    Seems hopeless to me. I know, I know, I can stay at my current position in nursing for awhile before trying again to put in for the specialty I was trained in at my own city hospital. But I would prefer to work in my own city!

    How can they do this?
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   MandyInMS
    Sounds a bit fishy seeing how they have hired new grads into the position you are requesting..why couldn't you just be hired and go through an orientation period like I'm sure they do, to learn all the new in's and out's that have taken place in your few years off?? and YIKES at pay-cut plus 1 hour commute..can't blame you about being upset about that....could you work at this new job for sayyy 6 months to prove your abilities and then be hired at your local hospital?? ...wish you best of luck (((hugz)))
  4. by   yannadey
    Blackballed, blueballed just plain balled "How can they do this?" you asked, because they can & maybe by hiring new grads they pay them less than what they would have to pay you.
    I know it sucks having a long commute & working for less but try & stick it out say for 6months to get "refreshed" then reapply at your local hospital. Nothing my dear is hopeless.
  5. by   sjoe
    "Blackballed" in a case like this would mean your hospital has let the other healthcare facilities in your area know that they DON'T recommend that you be hired.

    But, from all you have said, my suggestion would be to stay where you are, even though a commute is involved. You have no reason to trust your nearby hospital, even if and when they might hire you (they might fire you at any time and/or insist on assignments and shifts you would find intolerable), and getting some recent experience elsewhere will give you more marketability when and if you do want to work closer to home later on.
  6. by   webbiedebbie
    Thanks, everyone. I was beginning to think there was something wrong with me. I will hang onto my present position to gain the "so-called experience" and will re-apply to my own city hospital in about 6 months. I'm curious to see what they have to say then.
  7. by   nurse2002
    Originally posted by yannadey
    Blackballed, blueballed just plain balled "How can they do this?" you asked, because they can & maybe by hiring new grads they pay them less than what they would have to pay you.
    IMO you hit that right on the head!
  8. by   -jt
    Youll have to suffer with the commute for a while longer & get that experience on your resume, but what if you also worked local agency for a while in your free time and specified to work OB - emphasizing your training & past experience? You could negotiate your way into it - especially if you first take a couple of recent continuing ed seminars & can show that you have some new CEUs in the field. With an agency, you could be sent to any hospital in your own city, gain updated experience in the field & possibly even do it at that very same facility that turned you down. Then when you reapply for a staff position in that department, how can they refuse you if you have recent OB experience and you were competent and qualified to work their OB (or any other OB) thru the agency?

    Or, after current hospital experience & updated CEUs in the field, you could hook up with a travel agency & ask for an OB assignment at a facility in your own city. You dont have to travel to another city & you will receive a housing stipend to help pay the rent/mortgage on the place you already live in. You will be getting that updated experience in your field, plus you will be able to sample the facility & decide if its a place you want to work, without first having to commit to a permanent staff position. And you'll get extra pay for living in your own house. You might even get a "travel" assignment in the same place that turned you down for the staff position. That would be a kick.

    You gotta do what you gotta do but there is more than one way to skin a cat.
  9. by   nimbex
    agree with sjoe, being in management in the past, you are getting the raw deal, be the best employee you can be, get it in writing on your eval, and then, ask your manager for help. adk him/her if they would hire you back to nursing.

    If not, then why, you need these contacts for references, treat them like gold and they will pay out
  10. by   webbiedebbie
    jt...I like your idea and have thought about doing that!

    Again, thanks everyone...I will hang in there to get the "so-called" recent experience and then hit my own city hospital somehow, either by travel or by re-applying. I HATE that this is the only hospital in this city! There's no competition, so I guess this hospital thinks it can get away with treating nurses this way.

    I also heard from one of the traveling companies that I contacted a few months ago that this hospital is not very friendly and most of their do not ask to be reassigned there. Gee, why would I want to get involved with this hospital in first place?! Go figure!

    Thanks again for the input!
  11. by   passionate
    All good points posted. Take this nugget to the bank. An employee has the right to see his/her current personnel file and copy any info. You cannot take the file with you but you have the right to read and copy. You may find this helpful in the future.
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from passionate
    All good points posted. Take this nugget to the bank. An employee has the right to see his/her current personnel file and copy any info. You cannot take the file with you but you have the right to read and copy. You may find this helpful in the future.
    This thread is over 4 years old, albeit the advice is still prudent.
  13. by   AprilRNhere
    Old thread..but I'll put my 2 cents in. As a new grad I've actually seen one very large hospital advertise similar to this. (the mayo clinic in MN) They require for many positions 2 years experience on that floor...OR nursing school in the previous 2 years. I asked about it and was told it was because of change in the medical field. Students are freshly trained in new techniques/equipment and it hasn't been long since they did clinical rounds on most depts.
  14. by   nanna1999
    it is happening all over in nursing. experienced nurses like us are being exchanged for new grads at less pay and the hospital can train them to their tactics with out debriefing from experiences.

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