And we wonder why...

  1. I saw this on CBS news' website. Thought that ya'll would REALLY appreciate it.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/...in537899.shtml

    So, with a BSN, I'm a blue-collar worker. News to me.

    Happy Monday!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    A lot of blue collar workers have better salaries and working conditions than nurses. I wouldn't mind being included with them.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    So now we are blue collar, huh? Lumped right in their w/ cashiers and plumbers...except that they often make more $$ than we do, and don't have 1/1000 as much responsibility!

    When it comes to pay, employers want us to think we're blue collar. But when it comes to organizing or joining a union, THEN we are PROFESSIONALS, and should never consider such a thing!
  5. by   micro
    didn't read the site.........yet
    but I don't have a problem being called a blue collar worker.....
    a good honest days work for a good honest day's pay.......
    and if organizing and unions are good enough for blue collar workers.........then they are good enough for me.....
    my father who I respect with more than words will ever say......was a blue collar worker for the majority of his life, before he retired........and raised a family of four children on what a blue collar made.........

    enough outta micro
  6. by   Furball
    I always thought nurses and teachers were referred to as "pink" collar. Blue collar is a step up?

    Whatever...nurses aren't respected....trusted but little real respect.
  7. by   dawngloves
    Considering "White Collar" is someone that sits on their a$$ behind a desk all day I don't mind.
  8. by   eltrip
    Originally posted by Hellllllo Nurse
    So now we are blue collar, huh? Lumped right in their w/ cashiers and plumbers...except that they often make more $$ than we do, and don't have 1/1000 as much responsibility!

    When it comes to pay, employers want us to think we're blue collar. But when it comes to organizing or joining a union, THEN we are PROFESSIONALS, and should never consider such a thing!
    It just seems odd/wierd to me. Are we a profession or not? Confusing.
  9. by   hoolahan
    Apparently, blue collar in the context of this article means paid by the hour. Obviously there are many nursing positions which are salaried.

    Having worked both salary and hourly, I can tell you, I prefer hourly. Once you go salary, you are expected to work over and above, provide more revenue, or cover for staff absences, whatever...forget it! I went for an interview for a great CM job today and was told, we are very demanding, we will expect you to be here each day as long as it takes, it's not uncommon to have a nine hour day, if anyone leaves at 4:30, that is a miracle.

    Then I called VNA to confirm my per diem days and rates and found out we got an huge increase to $30/hr weekdays and $36/hr weekends. I can bring home more than I did working 32 hours (yes every weekend tho) than I did working FT salary!

    So I say, I'd rather be blue collar and free to choose my hours and days to work, than be a white collar slave to the rat race!
  10. by   -jt
    <But when it comes to organizing or joining a union, THEN we are PROFESSIONALS, and should never consider such a thing!>

    They dont tell us that in NYC. It would be illogical for them to try to use such an argument because we have doctors, dentists, attorneys, teachers and college professors, - all kinds of professionals - unionized in this city.
  11. by   MrsK1223
    Well, just my spill but I think this is another example of how nurses are not seen as professionals. I know plumbers, mechanics and such make much more but in no way do they have the responsibilities we do. If nursing was a male dominated profession we probably wouldn't be having this discussion. I realize this was based on hourly wage earners but I think its sad that we are thought of as nonprofessionals as a whole.
  12. by   Hardknox
    The article said "blue collar and service" and I think they consider us a service profession, as in "the service around here stinks, nurse".
  13. by   SandyB
    Originally posted by Hardknox
    The article said "blue collar and service" and I think they consider us a service profession, as in "the service around here stinks, nurse".
    LOL
  14. by   Merry1
    The article said "blue collar and service" and I think they consider us a service profession, as in "the service around here stinks, nurse".

    Could I have this coffee warmed up deary??LOL!!!

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