An astounding lack of diversity in nursing - page 4

I pasted my comment from another thread (above) into its own thread because I'm interested in why y'all think there is such a lack of diversity in nursing and what you think the solutions should be.... Read More

  1. by   ExCorporateRN
    Bottom line......it needs to be the best qualified get the shot no matter WHAT they look like! Whoever can survive the rigors of nursing school and the profession plus be damn good at what they do - should be the nurses.
  2. by   missi30
    Recruiting "minorities" presents an option to a group that might not have seen nursing as an option. Also, just because you are recruiting "minorities" does not mean you are not getting the best "qualified" nurses.
  3. by   RN BSN 2009
    A large majority of scholarships at our school are for minority nurses... But I'm thinking you have to get them interested in the first place! Interesting post.
  4. by   caroladybelle
    As a Jewish woman, NO ONE recruited me to nursing. I came to nursing on my own.

    I had no scholarships. I worked full time, helped raise a child throughout school.

    Much of my family (Christian and Jewish) did not approve of me going into nursing. It isn't a "clean" profession nor prestigious. I was told that I was "too smart" to be a nurse. My father (exmilitary and a police officer) thought nursing school was a waste of money-go to college for "good job" -not nursing. Many of my friends from minority groups had families that voiced the same concerns.

    I am really tired of the idea that we must "recruit" diversity. Invariably, if there were larger numbers of minorities in nursing, someone would complain that the majority is consigning minorities to a profession, that is dirty, messy, working class and treated in a subordinate manner. But because the majority of nurses are not of a minority class, nursing suddenly is a preferred job that people supposedly are being excluded from. The undesirable aspects that make it less than glamorous are glossed over.
  5. by   smk1
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Page after page? I don't think so. Where? Where?! I just finished grad school and I only remember perhaps 1 or 2 scholarships that had race as a factor in the scholarship but it certainly was not the only requirement, income and gpa was also a factor. In fact, I did not qualify for any of them myself mainly because of income. So far, I've completed two degrees and I have yet to fall into this bonanza of minority scholarships that is presumed to be dropped into our laps. I have a student loan also plus I worked the entire time I was in graduate school.


    Please stop spreading falsehoods, they only perpetuate prejudices. NOW you may go back to your regularly scheduled debate.
    I agree I saw ONE minority scholarship that I would qualify for and only 3 total minorities out of the pages and pages that I printed off at school some months back. I don't understand why people want to perpetuate this myth of monies and services that are out there for the taking for minorities. In any case I don't see why recruitment of minorities (which encompases a large and diverse group of people) should irritate people. It's not like recrruitment = automatic acceptance to a program. I too have found that a lot of nrsing students are "legacy" students. We have six males in our class, I am african american and we started with 4 asians. Decent diversity by regular NS stats.
  6. by   smk1
    Quote from CorporateToRN
    Bottom line......it needs to be the best qualified get the shot no matter WHAT they look like! Whoever can survive the rigors of nursing school and the profession plus be damn good at what they do - should be the nurses.
    Exactly!
  7. by   smk1
    Deep down I thought I would "prefer" a male nurse when I was in labor, but i found that I was so tired, so uncomfortable and just generally "done" with being pregnant that I didn't care who was my nurse or who was the doctor on call, I just wanted the kid out.
  8. by   Huscarl73
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Page after page? I don't think so. Where?
    Please stop spreading falsehoods, they only perpetuate prejudices. NOW you may go back to your regularly scheduled debate.
    Ok, I will call your raise.

    Discovernursing.com

    Search criteria
    State: Mississippi
    Gpa 3.5
    Ethnicity No restriction
    Program Undergraduate

    In spite of these criteria it returned 32 scholarships funded by various institutions far far away. Which require committing to working there for X amount of time. Which I believe falls into my criteria of terms I'm not willing to accept.

    BSN or LPN bridge programs-3
    Religious affiliation-4
    Gender (opposite)- 2
    Ethnicity - 8
    with no location restrictions
    Other -3
    other includes criteria such as participation in equine activites, go figure
    All - 1
    all includes my criteria, adn, with no gender or ethnicity requirements

    From what I'm seeing this website has exactly ONE scholarship that I am eligible for. I will also note that on the search page where the criteria are listed it claims that it has 31 scholarships avaliable based upon ethnicity. For some reason caucasian isn't one of the catagories.

    Let us try minoritynurse.com. I'm not even gonna bother to count number of scholarships on it, there is a number of them. Or for that matter count the number of related websites.
    Let us try caucasiannurse.com. Internet explorer cannot display the webpage. No joy there.

    In previous post my concluding incomplete sentence was supposed to say that if some indian tribe wants to pay for one of it's people to go to school and then come back and be a nurse on their reservation, I have absolutely no problem with that. I'm pretty sure I wrote or intended to write something similar to that, not sure what happened to it.

    I agree that my post could be seen as inflammatory. But in my opinion the fact that it may not be politically correct does not make it any less true. Perhaps you have found some websites that have a few pages of scholarships that meet my critieria, please feel free to share.
  9. by   EmerNurse
    Honestly, I get tired of hearing the diversity thing, too. I'm SORRY I'm caucasion, ok? I shouldn't feel like I have to apologize.

    I didn't get handed anything, my parents weren't college educated and I certainly didn't get my desire to be a nurse from them. Was something I grew up and wanted to do (at 36!). Before that, I'd joined the military. And I worked full-time and paid upfront for my education, thank you. Didn't qualify for anything, even with 4 kids at home. I'd have LOVED to be able to work part time or not at all, AND have financial aid money left over after paying tuition, as many of my fellow classmates did. Didn't qualify.

    I don't think we're ever going to see an end to racism as long as ANY distinctions are made for any race. I hate the history months. Why not, instead, topic history months? SCIENCE history month, or MATH history month, or even (heaven forbid) HEALTH history month - all highlighting contributors of ALL races. Just think - not only teach kids the progression of our society based on all sorts of cool things, but also introduce them to career possibilities in the process!

    If you MUST have specific scholarships, base them on income need and then on scholastic effort. Note I said effort, NOT gpa. That covers schools that are overcrowded and have other educational challenges. The kid who showed up to school every day, volunteered in the library and participated in extracurricular activities - the one who has already shown that he/she wants to put in the EFFORT. If we do that, will many minorities benefit. Absolutely! And that's great! But it won't be BASED on skin color or nationality.

    Take race OUT of opportunities - base it on other objective, measurable criteria. If you WANT to end racism, quit putting such emphasis on it! Not everything that goes wrong is the fault of race or racism. Sometimes crap happens, sometimes life's not fair, someone doesn't like you - doesn't always mean race is a factor. I'm quite capable of liking or disliking someone on much stronger evidence that the color of anyone's skin.

    But when I see official nursing associations that I am excluded from, based on my color, I think: so it was bad back then but now it's ok as long as it's not YOU? If it's wrong, it's wrong.

    Sorry for the rant but sheesh!

    <flame away - I have 2 more days off to deal with it>
  10. by   Cattitude
    another white female here. i certainly didn't get handed anything either, matter of fact i had to struggle like heck to get what i have. i grew up quite needy with mom on social services. i had to work to help put food on the table and put myself through school.

    college was a necessity for me. without it, i knew i would be destined to a lifetime of low paying jobs and struggling to make ends meet.

    in my current area of nursing and job, i am a minority. the majority of nurses are black females. they are diverse in the fact that they are not all american born, some from jamaica, trinidad, africa, england,and several other places. i would say that at the level of staff nurses it's probably about 80-85% black and 15-20% white. management is more equal with about 50/50.
    i love diversity, the more the better in my eyes, and i don't like anything that separates us. i wish we had more organizations that focused on joining nurses together in general, keeping us in unity, rather than focusing on a specific ethnicity.

    i really wish the world was colorblind, reality stinks.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I don't think we're ever going to see an end to racism as long as ANY distinctions are made for any race.
    AMEN!!!!!!!
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    But when I see official nursing associations that I am excluded from, based on my color, I think: so it was bad back then but now it's ok as long as it's not YOU? If it's wrong, it's wrong.
    Completely agree.
  13. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Lots of people have commented along the lines of: I desired it, I pursued it, why can't anybody else?

    Fair enough.

    Two issues here.

    1. WHY aren't more minorities desiring to pursue nursing? This is an important question and addresses cultural differences.

    2. The issue isn't today, with full wait lists, but going forward to the future. IN THE FUTURE, there is going to be greater demand for nurses from a smaller demographic that includes more and more minorities.

    If minorities are not invested in becoming nurses, for WHATEVER reason, that has to be addressed now or otherwise, in a very few short years, there are simply not going to be enough applicants for nursing.

    AT THAT POINT, when demand for nurses hits headlong into a brickwall of little supply, something will have to give. I'm afraid that what will give is that our responsibilities, which can no longer be sufficiently recruited, will be handed off to a lower level of care.

    Folks, this is ALREADY happening.

    At this point, addressing this issue is a matter of future job security, for all of us.

    At the other end of the spectrum, this IS an issue of fairness. If whites have a built in advantage of cultural desire to become nurses, then it's simply an issue of fairness to address why this isn't the case for other minorities. This is not simply a black/white thing. The biggest current gap between population and representation in nursing is with Hispanics.

    The issue isn't giving some minority a 'leg up', or lowering standards. The issue is getting the highest standard of candidates to be interested in nursing, regardless of race.

    A color-blind society would be wonderful. However, there is simply not a color-blind level of interest in nursing. It is important, I believe, to figure out why that is the case.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Mar 10, '07

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