An astounding lack of diversity in nursing - page 11

I pasted my comment from another thread (above) into its own thread because I'm interested in why y'all think there is such a lack of diversity in nursing and what you think the solutions should be.... Read More

  1. by   blueheaven
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    current production in works: possible new nurse show/pilot

    philadelphia general (pgh) closed in mid 70's. hey, maybe i should send producer info on one of my retired staff nurses (50 yrs experience) who trained + worked there...could be taped for then/now authenticity!
    i didn't know that pgh closed in the 70's...my mom (1949-1950) did part of her nursing school there.
  2. by   sayitgirl
    Quote from spacenurse
    Because this thread is so long I'm repeating that most of the LPNs in my state are minority women and men.
    They have proven they are able and willing to do nursing work.
    I think this is where we can recruit registered nurses by providing scholarships and stipends.

    How about a GI bill for veterans who want to go to nursing school?
    Just like how my father and many of your fathers or grandfathers were educated. The GI Bill of Rights created the educated American middle class.

    Now provide the funds and nursing school slots and they will come!

    PS: Sharon, the article was right on!
    Suebee: I wish I hadn't missed that show.
    That is odd that most of the LPNs in your state are minorites, it is not the norm in new jersey almost sounds like segregation reincarnated....
  3. by   pickledpepperRN
    I think it is quite complicated.
    In the early eighties my hospital decided to go toward an all RN staff. LVNs were laid off.
    With one exception the white LVNs went back to school and are now RNs.
    The Black and Hispanic LVNs are still LVNs.
    WHY?
    They all state different personal reasons. Mostly short term financial difficulties and lack of time with family. I waited until my kids were in highschool to go back for my RN.
    I think family encouragement is almost essential.

    BUT I also think encouragement in terms of decreased red tape, waiting lists, inflexible work schedules and such would encourage LVN/LPNs to earn their RN too.

    I do think the initial decision could be guidance counsellers at highschools with minority student bodies advising people interested in nursing into an LVN/LPN program rather than ADN or BSN.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Dec 1, '07
  4. by   anonymurse
    Amazing how responses to this thread cite local nurse force composition down to the shop level in refutation of national RN breakdown. A little denial here maybe? Critical thinking please?
  5. by   sayitgirl
    Quote from spacenurse
    I think it is quite complicated.
    In the early eighties my hospital decided to go toward an all RN staff. LVNs were laid off.
    With one exception the white LVNs went back to school and are now RNs.
    The Black and Hispanic LVNs are still LVNs.
    WHY?
    They all state different personal reasons. Mostly short term financial difficulties and lack of time with family. I waited until my kids were in highschool to go back for my RN.
    I think family encouragement is almost essential.

    BUT I also think encouragement in terms of decreased red tape, waiting lists, inflexible work schedules and such would encourage LVN/LPNs to earn their RN too.

    I do think the initial decision could be guidance counsellers at highschools with minority student bodies advising people interested in nursing into an LVN/LPN program rather than ADN or BSN.
    Thanks for the info:spin:
  6. by   sayitgirl
    Quote from anonymurse
    Amazing how responses to this thread cite local nurse force composition down to the shop level in refutation of national RN breakdown. A little denial here maybe? Critical thinking please?
    :spin:? the previous info was helpful, critical thinking is not always necessary for direct information.
  7. by   anonymurse
    Quote from sayitgirl
    :spin:? the previous info was helpful, critical thinking is not always necessary for direct information.
    Apologies, was responding to the whole thread (figures and "refutations" of the figures) and not your post.
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    California Registered nurses under age 35 are 52% male and minority female.
    48% are white women.

    http://www.rn.ca.gov/pdfs/forms/survey2006.pdf
  9. by   MBANurse
    I have to admit that I have not read the entire thread.

    I do want to address the "equality" factor. Someone asked early on; "Do you think a black nurse can be just as good as a white nurse?"
    The answer is an obvious and resounding "yes."

    The follow up question was then "shouldn't we actively recruit nurses from minorities then?"

    I propose a different question.
    Shouldn't we actively recruit quality individuals to be nurses? Regardless of their race; religion color or creed?

    I think the answer to that question is yes. I think that if we provide postive role models than more people of all backgrounds will be drawn to nursing. Honestly, who cares if the nurses are 99% black or 99% male or whatever.

    It seems to me that people hate labels and stereotypes and pigeonholes... that is until those labels; sterotypes and pigeon holes work towards their advantage.

    We are either all people and nurses; or we are not. If race should not be an issue (which it shouldn't) why is it then that it is constantly made into one?

    just my 2 cents.
  10. by   navvet
    Why does everything have to be about race! who gives a hoot? The person who has the appropriate courses taken to get into a school and who has the fortitude to finish and pass the NCLEX LPN or RN and has the desire to care for people should enter this profession period. Nothing more Nothing less.
  11. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    I think diversity exists in nursing, but it may be regional and departmental. I would expect that your staffing would represent your local population, as well as, schooling choices(availability).

    In NJ, my ER is incredibly diverse-many males-even mix of white, black, hispanic, phillipino, jamaican,and haitian. I am not sure about the floors-perhaps, males gravitate towards specialties. I have to admit those are the only areas I've seen them in. What's interesting is that radiology seems to attract alot of males-perhaps its the perception that nursing is a woman's job?

    I love my coworkers and can't imagine any other mix-regardless of our differences, or professional goals are the same! Caring for our patients and doing the best we can to help them heal. I'd also like to think that are patients may be getting exposed to people they might not in their regular lives.

    Education will always be a point of contention-we want the best to care for us, yet Timothy has a point-all schools do not prepare children equally for college. I don't know how we can fix that, without fixing all of the reasons surrounding it.

    BUT, I do believe that only the best should be admitted-regardless of sex, or race. Would you go to a lawyer or doctor or any other professional if you knew that they were last in their class, if you had a choice? Would you trust the care of your children to that doctor? I wouldn't...

    Then again, women and men that I attended nursing school failed on their inability to translate(English quickly), understand complex concepts (during testing-English)or for that stupid medical calculations test(basic algebraic calculations). Some were excellent-had great skills, were smart, and good clinical skills-I was mad the school let them fall! Some left, others I met after they had been readmitted-some became my friends-we studied and hashed out test questions and critical thinking questions till we were sick of them! We went over that stupid math-once you get it it's easy. They all passed! In some ways, I believe they are smarter-reading in one language, thinking in another, then translating back--AMAZING.

    I think if nursing's image changes, perhaps it will be a desireable choice for students choosing their college course of study-as long as we are only seen from the perspective of pooper scoopers-WE WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE IMAGE PROBLEMS.

    JMO
    Maisy
  12. by   NurseWannabe1129
    Quote from nj1grlcrus
    The large majority of white female nurses is the result of the additudes 30-40 years ago, when nurses were all white females. The nurses training now are a very diverse group. I think that retirement of that huge wave of nurses reaching retirement age will drastically change the statistics. As far as not respecting the non-white male, move to the NY area, they WILL think you are a doctor, and probably value your opinion more than the traditional white female.

    I really agree with you on this one. My class of thirty is very diverse. Attitudes are definitely shifting.:clphnds:
  13. by   herring_RN
    I think the recent graduates are more diverse.
    Perhaps because age discrimination is less in nursing than some other occupations more older nurses are working.
    they entered nursing school when mostly white females were encouraged to become nurses.

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