To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks: - page 9

by dirtyhippiegirl

15,619 Unique Views | 134 Comments

You're presented with a five year-old who probably has appendicitis. The family is poor, does not have medical insurance, and they only have a small amount of money to cover diagnostics and treatment of their child. (Any... Read More


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    I used to use Allnurse.com as a touch stone for what nursing is, But some days I cannot believe some of the nasty crappy things that RNs say or feel about their patients. It makes me really sad. If you feel so entitled as an RN spend a couple more years in school, become an MD and then pass judgement. My patients love me because I care about them, not because I care how they are paying their bill.
    everwonder_y, Autymn, OCNRN63, and 2 others like this.
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    I believe that food is a basic right and I give money and food accordingly which buttresses my beliefs. Likewise, those in favor of socialized health care should give of their resources and time to help those not insured. With all the support that this topic has, I'm sure that those in favor could raise a lot of money. However, it's often hard to give up gym memberships, new model cars, or a drop in our standard of living. I wish we weren't so hypocritcal, myself included, yet we are.
    lindarn and romie like this.
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    Quote from grpman
    I believe that food is a basic right and I give money and food accordingly which buttresses my beliefs. Likewise, those in favor of socialized health care should give of their resources and time to help those not insured. With all the support that this topic has, I'm sure that those in favor could raise a lot of money. However, it's often hard to give up gym memberships, new model cars, or a drop in our standard of living. I wish we weren't so hypocritcal, myself included, yet we are.
    This is a typical conservative BS answer , which is spurious , this is already being addressed by the support systems we have ( welfare , TANF etc.) , so really not a problem like healthcare financing is .It really doesn't matter whether you view healthcare as a right or need , the answer I would like is what are we to do about paying for the healthcare of the uninsured , because you either have to answer that question or be honest and tell us what you are going to do when a person without money or insurance turns up at the ER , are you going to treat them (if so how will that care be financed ) or are you going to withold treatment even if it means they will die ?
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    Quote from nicurn001
    This is a typical conservative BS answer , which is spurious , this is already being addressed by the support systems we have ( welfare , TANF etc.) , so really not a problem like healthcare financing is .It really doesn't matter whether you view healthcare as a right or need , the answer I would like is what are we to do about paying for the healthcare of the uninsured , because you either have to answer that question or be honest and tell us what you are going to do when a person without money or insurance turns up at the ER , are you going to treat them (if so how will that care be financed ) or are you going to withold treatment even if it means they will die ?

    That wasn't BS or from a political view and I attempted to phrase it tactfully knowing that I have a hard time myself living up to my own ethics. However, I do have an answer: solve the problem by reducing all government employee's pay to raise funds (but Congress hasn't taken a pay cut in over 77 years), layoff enough government workers to raise the funds (USA Today reported that federal employees are more likely to die of natural causes than suffer a layoff), or raise taxes (I hope they start with those who call giving more money and time to charity a BS answer). We could also shuffle money from government pensions, defense, welfare, and social security to make it happen. Or maybe we could say that the 15 trillion dollar debt and 1.3 trillion deficit yearly amounts to a drop in the bucket. Most of us can't quantify much past $100,000 so I can see how all the zero's can look similar, but trust me, it's a lot of money.

    Now...that was BS.
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    You answerred the problem re. the national deficit and how you feel the national deficit should be addressed .

    You did not answer the question I posed of what is to be done to finance the care of the uninsured ( whether they are uninsured because they do not have the ability to pay for insurance or they choose to be uninsured [ those who have the financial resources to be insured but choose not to get insurance and place their risk upon us]). This is the question any health care refoRm has to address , because while we try to rely upon a private healthcare financing system there will always be those who will be unable or unwilling to pay for insurance , will we provide or withold care to them ?.
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    My point was not to answer all of your questions, but to give you a "true" BS conserative answer so you could see the difference. The last sentence of my post read, " Now that was BS." Read it again.
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    The thread is titled :- To all "medical coverage is a priveledge " folks , The OP posed a question which boils down to the one I reiterated above , what would those who believe medical coverage is a priveledge do to those who cannot / will not buy health insurance .So far in this thread that question remains unanswered. As I see it the alternatives are withold treatment , fund treatment by the present system ( combination of private and taxpayer ) ,or have charities cover the uninsured ( though I think it highly unlikely charities would be able to cover all the needs .
    While it is perfectly OK for the " medical coverage is a priveledge " folks to have that opinion , they need to answer the question of what to do about the uninsured , because if we continue with the present system of healthcare funding the tax payer will always have to cover these cost or watch the providers go bankrupt and /or people dying on the streets due to lack of care .
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    Great - I am curious.

    "...In the original example above, the 10 kids with appendectomies get their treatment ($50,000 to save 10 young lives) but a 50 year old with bowel cancer does not get the Bevacizumab ( a cancer drug that costs ~$50,000 to the NHS to give for a course of treatment) he needs because the NHS has to balance one 50 year old life against 10 kids..."

    Is this a literal, true example? I know here in America, much like some who are expressing opinions in this very thread - there are myths promulgated for the good of those in power. I am curious...if that actually happens in the U.K.? Does the patient literally get an appointment with someone in a suit and get told to his dying face that he will NOT receive the cancer drug...and why....??

    I am aware that socialized medicine has its negatives. I know about the lengthy times involved in dealing even with appointments etc.

    However, there are those of us in the U.S. who hope that some sort of hybrid between privatized billionaire-owning health empires and what many other countries have put in place related to a socialized core for health care can be formed. That is the goal I put my active support behind.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts and giving us information to think further about.
    tewdles likes this.
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    Patient is homeless? This is relevant because where are you going to dc them to? How are they going to follow up after they are dc? How are they going to afford their meds? Do they have transportation? If you know they are homeless you can have time while they are in the hospital to set them up with a sheltor, get med samples for them, and make sure they have access to a pop after dc so they don't end up back in they hospital!
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    Our current system discharges homeless people back to the street...


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