A Call to Action from the Nation's Nurses in the Wake of Newtown A Call to Action from the Nation's Nurses in the Wake of Newtown - pg.12 | allnurses

A Call to Action from the Nation's Nurses in the Wake of Newtown - page 12

Reposting from PSNA Communications email. Karen A Call to Action from the Nation's Nurses in the Wake of Newtown More Than 30 Nursing Organizations Call for Action in Wake of Newtown Tragedy ... Read More

  1. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
    Quote from Overland1
    My concern is that, as in so many cases, we (as nurses) are getting dragged into a lot of incorrect perceptions that have "grown legs" (thanks to the media and politicians, both of which I trust lately at a level one step below a stool sample). Nurses will be out there protesting, writing, and campaigning (as in the past with other issues) their way into being looked upon with disfavor when all the chips fall (and they will).

    We are nurses; most of us entered and remain in this profession to help people. We have the ability to make or break a person's life in mere seconds or less. We make a positive difference in people's lives every day. We also exercise great caution, logic, and reason in doing what we do as nurses. We need to exercise that same degree of caution, logic, and reason when pursuing and attaching ourselves the myriad causes out there.
    Excellent post. People need to stop trying to convince themselves they are more politically enlightened than others by virtue of their job. Everyone is entitled to their opinion about everything, but don't make the mistake of thinking your opinion is more informed due to your job. A nurse is no more enlightened about gun control than an actor is about the environment. When people start using their jobs to try to push a personal agenda in politically charged subjects they are doing themselves and others in the same career a disservice. If someone wants to speak as a nurse I would suggest sticking to what nurses do best, advocate for patients.
  2. Visit  InfirmiereJolie profile page
    Congratulations! America is ranked #65 out of SEVENTY FIVE (75) listed countries... making it have the 10th highest amounts of gun-related deaths, just behind El Salvador, Jamaica, Honduras, Guatemala, Swaziland, Columbia, Brazil, Panama and Mexico!!!! And BEHIND EVERY 1st WORLD COUNRY, ALL of Europe, and almost all of our trading partners what success!
    El Salvador 50.36 50.36 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Jamaica 47.44 47.44 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Honduras 46.70 46.70 NA NA NA 2007 OAS 2011[1]
    Guatemala 38.52 38.52 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Swaziland 37.16 37.16 NA NA NA 2004 UNODC 2006[1]
    Colombia 28.11 27.10 0.87 0.14 NA 2009 UNODC 2011 [2]
    Brazil 19.01 18.10 0.73 0.18 NA 2008 UNODC 2011[3]
    Panama 12.92 12.92 NA NA NA 2010 OAS 2011[1]
    Mexico 11.14 10.00 0.67 0.47 NA 2010 UNODC 2011[4]
    United States
    10.2 3.7 6.1 0.2 0.1 2009 OAS 2012[5][6] (10th place in HIGHEST number of gun-related deaths.What a horrifying embarressment on the world stage and sad for our poor people!)
    Philippines 9.46 9.46 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    South Africa 9.41 NA NA NA NA 2012 UNODC 2012[8] & Stats SA[9]
    Montenegro 8.55 2.06 6.49 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Paraguay 7.35 7.35 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Nicaragua 7.14 7.14 NA NA NA 2007 OAS 2011[1]
    Argentina 5.65 3.00 2.01 0.64 NA 2001 2008 UNODC 2011[12]
    Canada 4.78 0.76 3.72 0.22 NA 1992 Krug 1998[13]
    Zimbabwe 4.75 4.75 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Serbia 3.90 0.62 2.81 0.18 0.29 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Finland 3.64 0.26 3.34 0.02 0.02 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Switzerland 3.5 0.52 3.15 0.10 0.07 2010 OAS 2011[1]
    Costa Rica 3.32 3.32 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Uruguay 3.24 3.24 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Croatia 3.01 0.57 2.35 0.07 0.02 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Barbados 3 3 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    France 3.00 0.22 2.33 0.05 0.41 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Austria 2.94 0.18 2.68 NA 0.08 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    New Zealand 2.66 0.17 2.14 0.09 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Estonia 2.54 0.30 1.57 0.07 0.60 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Slovenia 2.44 0.05 2.34 NA 0.05 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Belgium 2.43 0.29 1.96 0.01 0.16 2006 WHO 2012[10]
    Malta 2.16 0.48 1.68 NA NA 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Peru 1.87 1.87 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Israel 1.86 0.94 0.71 0.03 0.19 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Republic of Macedonia 1.04 0.45 0.42 0.08 0.08 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Luxembourg 1.81 0.60 1.00 NA 0.20 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Norway 1.78 0.04 1.72 0.02 NA 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Portugal 1.77 0.48 1.09 0.02 0.18 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Czech Republic 1.76 0.12 1.39 0.10 0.15 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Slovakia 1.75 0.18 0.94 0.39 0.24 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Lithuania 1.61 0.24 1.00 0.03 0.33 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Georgia 1.54 0.23 0.09 1.00 0.23 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Greece 1.5 0.59 0.84 0.04 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Sweden 1.47 0.19 1.20 0.06 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Denmark 1.45 0.22 1.16 0.04 0.04 2006 WHO 2012[10]
    Latvia 1.43 0.18 0.94 0.04 0.27 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Bulgaria 1.35 0.23 0.87 0.14 0.11 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Italy 1.28 0.36 0.81 0.08 0.03 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Kuwait 1.25 0.36 0.06 0 NA 1995 Krug 1998[13]
    Iceland 1.25 NA 1.25 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Germany 1.10 0.06 0.94 0.02 0.08 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Moldova 1.04 1.04 NA NA NA 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Australia 1.05 0.09 0.79 0.02 0.15 2008 UNODC 2011[14]
    Ireland 1.03 0.36 0.56 0.04 0.07 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Kyrgyzstan 1.01 0.53 0.07 0.28 0.13 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    India 0.93 0.93 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Hungary 0.85 0.13 0.72 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Cyprus 0.83 0.24 0.48 NA 0.11 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Uzbekistan 0.68 0.58 0.03 NA 0.08 2005 WHO 2012[10]
    Spain 0.63 0.15 0.42 0.05 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Netherlands 0.46 0.20 0.24 0.01 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Taiwan 0.42 0.13 0.12 0.11 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Belarus 0.38 0.38 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Ukraine 0.35 0.35 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    United Kingdom 0.25 0.04 0.17 0.01 0.02 2011 WHO2012 [10]
    Poland 0.26 0.02 0.12 0.02 0.09 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Singapore 0.24 0.07 0.17 0 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Romania 0.20 0.04 0.06 0.09 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Hong Kong 0.19 0.12 0.07 0 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Mauritius 0.19 0 0.09 0.09 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Qatar 0.18 0.18 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    South Korea 0.13 0.04 0.02 0.05 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Japan 0.07 0.02 0.04 0 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Azerbaijan 0.07 0.04 0.01 0.02 NA 2007 WHO 2012[10]
    Chile 0.06 0.06 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    10.2 (ours) vs the lowest .06 (Chile)... which makes ours ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY (170) TIMES HIGHER! And while the entire European Union (500 million people and 27 countries) had only 1,260 murders by guns... the United States (only 300 million compared to 500 million) had 10,801!!!!!! http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms/wp-con...eanLemaire.pdf That is nearly 10 times higher.

    Atleast someone is doing something about this atrocity against humanity.

    "There is a definite need to control handgun use and the accompanying violence that leads individuals to use handguns. ANA supports both the waiting period for the purchase of handguns and a ban on the sale of all assault weapons.

    Firearms, especially handguns, remain a leading instrument of violent injury. As the largest single group of clinical health care professionals within the health system, licensed registered nurses are on the front lines of the health care system and witness first hand the devastation from the injuries sustained as a result of gun violence."
    The American Nursing Association, letter to the 112th Congress http://www.nursingworld.org/GunContr...hCongress.aspx

    Accross the border in Canada, nurses are doing the something about this cruel atrocity, too.

    "A core purpose of the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions (CFNU) is to be a proactive,
    unifying national voice for the socio-economic welfare of nurses and others.
    Health promotion is a key role of nurses. Gun control legislation works to prevent injury and death
    and can therefore be likened to other injury and death prevention policies such as seatbelts or
    hockey helmets. As well, gun control is a women’s issue as it reduces the risk of spousal
    homicide, intimidation and injury. 93% of our members are women.

    For nurses, firearms control, including the long-gun registry, is not a north/south or rural/urban
    issue. Gun control is a health and safety issue and it is a gender issue.

    As health professionals, we know the importance of investing in prevention, whether in road
    safety or prevention of infectious diseases. It is true that one cannot easily measure prevention, but
    we can certainly measure the effects of ignoring it. To our knowledge, six different coroners’
    inquests recommended the licensing of gun owners and registration of all firearms. Indeed, our
    daily practice informs us of the very real risks associated with firearms and of the value of a strong
    gun control law.

    Health Promotion and Prevention
    Over 70% of deaths from firearms are suicides.
     Most deaths by firearms and suicides are committed with shotguns or rifles.
     The progress made over the past 15 years in the field of suicide prevention is enormous.
     Many suicide deaths are preventable.
     Reduced access to certain methods of suicide and preventive actions with vulnerable people
    are important measures as part of a strategy for suicide prevention.
     The registration of firearms, requiring licenses renewable every five years for gun owners and
    background checks, as well as efforts to raise awareness of safe storage of firearms have been
    recognized for their impact in significantly decreased suicide rates.

    Reducing Violence Against Women
     72% of women who die from gun shot wounds in Canada are shot with long guns and rifles.
    Guns in the home is a risk factor for spousal homicide, whether long guns or handguns.
    Spousal homicides with guns have fallen since gun control legislation in the 1990s by two
    thirds, whereas spousal homicides without guns have remained the same.
     When a gun is involved in domestic violence, the chance of a woman’s death increases by 12
    times compared to other forms of violence.
     Women who live with a gun in their home are more likely to be shot and killed than those who
    live in gun-free homes. Even if the guns are not directly fired on women, they are often used as
    a tool of intimidation in rape, or physical or psychological violence."
    The Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions, letter to the Canadian Senate Standing Committee
    on Legal and Constitutional Affairs http://www.nursesunions.ca/sites/def...ch_28_2012.pdf

    (old, but interesting) Mrs. McCarthy Goes to Washington: Nurse Takes Gun-Control Crusade to Congress as a U.S. Representative

    "...Congresswoman McCarthy is fully aware that the legislation she either proposes or supports directly impacts those who work on the front lines of health care. She has proposed legislation that seeks to protect healthcare workers, such as the Health Care Worker Protection Act, which requires hospitals to use safer needles and find money for safe training. The Health Care Worker Protection Act recently passed the House.

    ...Her accomplishments notwithstanding, she will not consider her mission complete until every citizen is safe from gun violence. For her efforts, she has received many honors, which are listed on her official Congressional Web site (Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy : Home). She was named one of New York Newsday’s 100 Long Island Influentials, Congressional Quarterly’s 50 Most Effective Legislators in Congress, one of Redbook Magazine’s nine Mothers and Shakers, Ladies’ Home Journal list of America’s 100 Most Important Women and Advertising Age’s list of Most Impact by Women in 1999." Mrs. McCarthy Goes to Washington: Nurse Takes Gun-Control Crusade to Congress as a U.S. Representative - NurseZone

  3. Visit  tyvin profile page
    We can have all the rules and what not in our society on how kids do this and that; what makes them violent, which generation is better, how guns are bad, etc... but ultimately it starts with the parents at home. With over 50% of kids growing up in single parent families what leads to the center of the problem is clear to me.

    Is it the video games or is it a coincidence that the divorce rate and teenage pregnancy was on the rise at the same time more or less? Also, the fact that more parents are reluctant to let their kids play outside unsupervised for fear of never seeing them again with all the disappearing children on the increase. Young kids coming home to empty houses due to parent/parents working.

    Is crime on the rise or is it now with advanced technology in place how we are able to hear about every gruesome crime at the exact time it happens just by turning on the TV, radio, or computer? 50 years ago unless we were related to the family members or in the state we wouldn't have heard of nearly any of the stuff we do today.

    It isn't just this generation or the other but all generations had parents trying to act like friends to their kids instead of actual parents. I believe it started witht the increasing divorce rate. Everyone has their opinions and everyone has their own particular soapbox but that doesn't make the next persons any less important. It starts in the home with the aid and access to education of mental health for everyone, including kids (right along with drug and alcohol education), and taking responsibility for each one's children.

    With over 70% of all gun deaths attributed to suicide (InfirmiereJolie) that is very telling. It tells me that gun control isn't the issue; the issue is mental health and home life. You know if they didn't have a gun they would have more then likely killed themselves in another way. Mental health has always taken a back seat to most things, it's time to bring it to the front of the room. When listening to the POTUS promoting his health care bill, I never heard him speak about mental health.

    It's time.
  4. Visit  Kyrshamarks profile page
    Well as a nurse all I have to say on this is the day they come for my guns is the day I end up dying more than likely. I will fight anyone that tries totake them away from me. Thankfully though that will not happen as NONE of my guns are registered and I do own quite a few guns including the oh so scary M 4 Bushmaster in bothlong version and theshortversionthat is considereda pistol. Even scarier I own a preban Uzi That is full auto. I even have silencers for a couple of my pistols as well as for the Bushmaster.

    p.s they all are (gasp!) kept loaded
  5. Visit  Kyrshamarks profile page
    ActuallyI need to amend on part of my post, my Uzi is registered, but that is the only one registered.
  6. Visit  Kyrshamarks profile page
    ... The dreaded double post....
  7. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    Quote from tyvin
    We can have all the rules and what not in our society on how kids do this and that; what makes them violent, which generation is better, how guns are bad, etc... but ultimately it starts with the parents at home. With over 50% of kids growing up in single parent families what leads to the center of the problem is clear to me.

    Is it the video games or is it a coincidence that the divorce rate and teenage pregnancy was on the rise at the same time more or less? Also, the fact that more parents are reluctant to let their kids play outside unsupervised for fear of never seeing them again with all the disappearing children on the increase. Young kids coming home to empty houses due to parent/parents working.

    Is crime on the rise or is it now with advanced technology in place how we are able to hear about every gruesome crime at the exact time it happens just by turning on the TV, radio, or computer? 50 years ago unless we were related to the family members or in the state we wouldn't have heard of nearly any of the stuff we do today.

    It isn't just this generation or the other but all generations had parents trying to act like friends to their kids instead of actual parents. I believe it started witht the increasing divorce rate. Everyone has their opinions and everyone has their own particular soapbox but that doesn't make the next persons any less important. It starts in the home with the aid and access to education of mental health for everyone, including kids (right along with drug and alcohol education), and taking responsibility for each one's children.

    With over 70% of all gun deaths attributed to suicide (InfirmiereJolie) that is very telling. It tells me that gun control isn't the issue; the issue is mental health and home life. You know if they didn't have a gun they would have more then likely killed themselves in another way. Mental health has always taken a back seat to most things, it's time to bring it to the front of the room. When listening to the POTUS promoting his health care bill, I never heard him speak about mental health.

    It's time.
    I agree with a lot of points in your post. However, in this day and age most parents DO have to work to even make ends meet in today's society. And parents divorce. It is not ideal, but certainly the time of "staying married for the kids" is not always the best choice. There are many, many single parents who raise successful and well adjusted kids. There are many parents who divorce due to the pressure of raising a child with profound difficulties. Hence why the more support we can give the better. Single parents with readily available resources or divorced parents with resources will net better results. Back in the day when Moms stayed home and Dads worked sometimes 2 jobs, and it is akin to being a single parent. And as noted in a previous post, parents need to know that they can take control of their children, and that is what is sorely lacking.
  8. Visit  InfirmiereJolie profile page
    Tyvin, I was raised by a single parent and never smoked, never drank, never broke the law... received many awards in school "Star Student, ect" never bullied anyone (as far as I know), good to my friends and others, was involved in sports, dance, and many other EC's, worked since 14 in various part time jobs, graduated and went to college with scholarships.... got a 4.0 in college, took leadership positions in student organizations, volunteered, ect. All it takes is one good person (you actually do not need two)... or better yet, one's OWN will, determination, ambition, and hard work.

    Single parenthood has nothing to do with well... anything (negative that is). The president was practically raised completely by his mother, practically a single parent from the get-go. There are many with this same story. Even more dramatic... I know people who had practically no parents at all and are doing just fine on their own. I can think of examples where people decide to not follow their family's footsteps. Why does this happen? Clearly it's due to a person's own free will - their ability to make their own choices of how they are going to live their lives. People control themselves and their actions. They are their own keepers. It is "I can because I want to" not "I can because someone tells me I can."

    Genetics, home life, socioeconomic situation, geographic location (in America i.e.,) has nothing to do with what path a person ultimately chooses for themselves - it is their own free will and self-control. It is their choice.

    (on separate subject in post, last par)...Actually, if you look at research on it... people are LESS likely to sadly and impulsively (which it usually is, contrary to some belief) make a snap decision when guns are not accessible. They also have a higher survival rate if they try. Pg 10 by Jean Lemaire, The Journal of Risk and Insurance... "The unavailability of a firearm then would reduce the fatality rate of firearm suicides from 96.5 percent to 22.42 percent [overall] for males, and from 96 percent to 5.99 percent [overall] for females" http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms/wp-con...eanLemaire.pdf (note, he is taking into account other methods and substitution).

    This is like putting seat belts into a car.

    ((At least the American Nursing Association, Canadian Federation for Nursing Unions, and the Nurse/Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy recognize this and are making a difference re D.C. lawmaking))


    Quote from tyvin
    We can have all the rules and what not in our society on how kids do this and that; what makes them violent, which generation is better, how guns are bad, etc... but ultimately it starts with the parents at home. With over 50% of kids growing up in single parent families what leads to the center of the problem is clear to me.

    Is it the video games or is it a coincidence that the divorce rate and teenage pregnancy was on the rise at the same time more or less? Also, the fact that more parents are reluctant to let their kids play outside unsupervised for fear of never seeing them again with all the disappearing children on the increase. Young kids coming home to empty houses due to parent/parents working.

    Is crime on the rise or is it now with advanced technology in place how we are able to hear about every gruesome crime at the exact time it happens just by turning on the TV, radio, or computer? 50 years ago unless we were related to the family members or in the state we wouldn't have heard of nearly any of the stuff we do today.

    It isn't just this generation or the other but all generations had parents trying to act like friends to their kids instead of actual parents. I believe it started witht the increasing divorce rate. Everyone has their opinions and everyone has their own particular soapbox but that doesn't make the next persons any less important. It starts in the home with the aid and access to education of mental health for everyone, including kids (right along with drug and alcohol education), and taking responsibility for each one's children.

    With over 70% of all gun deaths attributed to suicide (InfirmiereJolie) that is very telling. It tells me that gun control isn't the issue; the issue is mental health and home life. You know if they didn't have a gun they would have more then likely killed themselves in another way. Mental health has always taken a back seat to most things, it's time to bring it to the front of the room. When listening to the POTUS promoting his health care bill, I never heard him speak about mental health.

    It's time.

    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    Well as a nurse all I have to say on this is the day they come for my guns is the day I end up dying more than likely. I will fight anyone that tries totake them away from me. Thankfully though that will not happen as NONE of my guns are registered and I do own quite a few guns including the oh so scary M 4 Bushmaster in bothlong version and theshortversionthat is considereda pistol. Even scarier I own a preban Uzi That is full auto. I even have silencers for a couple of my pistols as well as for the Bushmaster.

    p.s they all are (gasp!) kept loaded
    This is exactly why guns are harmful - they propel an "all or nothing" attitude... 100% success or 100% failure, alive or dead... false dilemma fallacy... as seen in this post.

    People are so blind, they cannot see it... There has to be something done. At 30,000 gun-related deaths a year this adds up to 2,370,000 deaths (times 79, 2012-1933) since 1933 (first year it was recorded). This is as large as to be called genocide... a strong and suitable word for a horrific, atrocious amount.... When people look at this number or anything related to gun-deaths, they just bat their eye, as if it was nothing. Any statistics, any graphs, any facts, any comparisions to ourselves to countries around the world.. the 65 countries leading us in managing this, goes in one ear... and out another...

    Also, re: registration... In Canada all long guns are required to be registered... this is one thing the Canadian Federation of Nursing Unions is strongly supporting in the previous post with persuasive and masterful ethos, pathos, and logos.
  9. Visit  Wile E Coyote profile page
    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    r)
    Also, re: registration... In Canada all long guns are required to be registered... this is one thing the Canadian Federation of Nursing Unions is strongly supporting in the previous post with persuasive and masterful ethos, pathos, and logos.
    Ah ,the lovely Canadian gun registry. Perhaps you'd be interested to know that the gun registry has been dismantled due to it's resounding failure and unjustified expense.
  10. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    Congratulations! America is ranked #65 out of SEVENTY FIVE (75) listed countries... making it have the 10th highest amounts of gun-related deaths, just behind El Salvador, Jamaica, Honduras, Guatemala, Swaziland, Columbia, Brazil, Panama and Mexico!!!! And BEHIND EVERY 1st WORLD COUNRY, ALL of Europe, and almost all of our trading partners what success!
    El Salvador 50.36 50.36 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Jamaica 47.44 47.44 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Honduras 46.70 46.70 NA NA NA 2007 OAS 2011[1]
    Guatemala 38.52 38.52 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Swaziland 37.16 37.16 NA NA NA 2004 UNODC 2006[1]
    Colombia 28.11 27.10 0.87 0.14 NA 2009 UNODC 2011 [2]
    Brazil 19.01 18.10 0.73 0.18 NA 2008 UNODC 2011[3]
    Panama 12.92 12.92 NA NA NA 2010 OAS 2011[1]
    Mexico 11.14 10.00 0.67 0.47 NA 2010 UNODC 2011[4]
    United States
    10.2 3.7 6.1 0.2 0.1 2009 OAS 2012[5][6] (10th place in HIGHEST number of gun-related deaths.What a horrifying embarressment on the world stage and sad for our poor people!)
    Philippines 9.46 9.46 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    South Africa 9.41 NA NA NA NA 2012 UNODC 2012[8] & Stats SA[9]
    Montenegro 8.55 2.06 6.49 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Paraguay 7.35 7.35 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Nicaragua 7.14 7.14 NA NA NA 2007 OAS 2011[1]
    Argentina 5.65 3.00 2.01 0.64 NA 2001 2008 UNODC 2011[12]
    Canada 4.78 0.76 3.72 0.22 NA 1992 Krug 1998[13]
    Zimbabwe 4.75 4.75 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Serbia 3.90 0.62 2.81 0.18 0.29 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Finland 3.64 0.26 3.34 0.02 0.02 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Switzerland 3.5 0.52 3.15 0.10 0.07 2010 OAS 2011[1]
    Costa Rica 3.32 3.32 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Uruguay 3.24 3.24 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Croatia 3.01 0.57 2.35 0.07 0.02 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Barbados 3 3 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    France 3.00 0.22 2.33 0.05 0.41 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Austria 2.94 0.18 2.68 NA 0.08 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    New Zealand 2.66 0.17 2.14 0.09 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Estonia 2.54 0.30 1.57 0.07 0.60 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Slovenia 2.44 0.05 2.34 NA 0.05 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Belgium 2.43 0.29 1.96 0.01 0.16 2006 WHO 2012[10]
    Malta 2.16 0.48 1.68 NA NA 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Peru 1.87 1.87 NA NA NA 2009 OAS 2011[1]
    Israel 1.86 0.94 0.71 0.03 0.19 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Republic of Macedonia 1.04 0.45 0.42 0.08 0.08 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Luxembourg 1.81 0.60 1.00 NA 0.20 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Norway 1.78 0.04 1.72 0.02 NA 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Portugal 1.77 0.48 1.09 0.02 0.18 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Czech Republic 1.76 0.12 1.39 0.10 0.15 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Slovakia 1.75 0.18 0.94 0.39 0.24 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Lithuania 1.61 0.24 1.00 0.03 0.33 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Georgia 1.54 0.23 0.09 1.00 0.23 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Greece 1.5 0.59 0.84 0.04 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Sweden 1.47 0.19 1.20 0.06 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Denmark 1.45 0.22 1.16 0.04 0.04 2006 WHO 2012[10]
    Latvia 1.43 0.18 0.94 0.04 0.27 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Bulgaria 1.35 0.23 0.87 0.14 0.11 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Italy 1.28 0.36 0.81 0.08 0.03 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Kuwait 1.25 0.36 0.06 0 NA 1995 Krug 1998[13]
    Iceland 1.25 NA 1.25 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Germany 1.10 0.06 0.94 0.02 0.08 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Moldova 1.04 1.04 NA NA NA 2011 WHO 2012[10]
    Australia 1.05 0.09 0.79 0.02 0.15 2008 UNODC 2011[14]
    Ireland 1.03 0.36 0.56 0.04 0.07 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Kyrgyzstan 1.01 0.53 0.07 0.28 0.13 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    India 0.93 0.93 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    Hungary 0.85 0.13 0.72 NA NA 2009 WHO 2012[10]
    Cyprus 0.83 0.24 0.48 NA 0.11 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Uzbekistan 0.68 0.58 0.03 NA 0.08 2005 WHO 2012[10]
    Spain 0.63 0.15 0.42 0.05 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Netherlands 0.46 0.20 0.24 0.01 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Taiwan 0.42 0.13 0.12 0.11 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Belarus 0.38 0.38 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]
    Ukraine 0.35 0.35 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    United Kingdom 0.25 0.04 0.17 0.01 0.02 2011 WHO2012 [10]
    Poland 0.26 0.02 0.12 0.02 0.09 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Singapore 0.24 0.07 0.17 0 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Romania 0.20 0.04 0.06 0.09 0.01 2010 WHO 2012[10]
    Hong Kong 0.19 0.12 0.07 0 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Mauritius 0.19 0 0.09 0.09 NA 1993 Krug 1998[13]
    Qatar 0.18 0.18 NA NA NA 2000 UNODC 2000[11]
    South Korea 0.13 0.04 0.02 0.05 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Japan 0.07 0.02 0.04 0 NA 1994 Krug 1998[13]
    Azerbaijan 0.07 0.04 0.01 0.02 NA 2007 WHO 2012[10]
    Chile 0.06 0.06 NA NA NA 2002 UNODC 2002[7]


    10.2 (ours) vs the lowest .06 (Chile)... which makes ours ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY (170) TIMES HIGHER! And while the entire European Union (500 million people and 27 countries) had only 1,260 murders by guns... the United States (only 300 million compared to 500 million) had 10,801!!!!!! http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms/wp-con...eanLemaire.pdf That is nearly 10 times higher.
    Interesting information. Am I the only one that noticed something the top countries, including the US, have in common? Two things actually. They all have major drug problems and they also have major gang problems.

    Why would Sweden, Finland, Qatar, etc have a lot of gun deaths, they don't have the same social problems as us. They don't have armed gangs killing each other over turf to sell their drugs. But we do, just like Mexico and Colombia. Yeah, banning guns would solve that problem in a week or two.

    Did you also notice how old some of these statistics are? They go back as far as 1993.
    Last edit by HM-8404 on Jan 4, '13 : Reason: added info
  11. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    Tyvin, I was raised by a single parent and never smoked, never drank, never broke the law... received many awards in school "Star Student, ect" never bullied anyone (as far as I know), good to my friends and others, was involved in sports, dance, and many other EC's, worked since 14 in various part time jobs, graduated and went to college with scholarships.... got a 4.0 in college, took leadership positions in student organizations, volunteered, ect. All it takes is one good person (you actually do not need two)... or better yet, one's OWN will, determination, ambition, and hard work.

    Single parenthood has nothing to do with well... anything (negative that is). The president was practically raised completely by his mother, practically a single parent from the get-go. There are many with this same story. Even more dramatic... I know people who had practically no parents at all and are doing just fine on their own. I can think of examples where people decide to not follow their family's footsteps. Why does this happen? Clearly it's due to a person's own free will - their ability to make their own choices of how they are going to live their lives. People control themselves and their actions. They are their own keepers. It is "I can because I want to" not "I can because someone tells me I can."

    Genetics, home life, socioeconomic situation, geographic location (in America i.e.,) has nothing to do with what path a person ultimately chooses for themselves - it is their own free will and self-control. It is their choice.

    (on separate subject in post, last par)...Actually, if you look at research on it... people are LESS likely to sadly and impulsively (which it usually is, contrary to some belief) make a snap decision when guns are not accessible. They also have a higher survival rate if they try. Pg 10 by Jean Lemaire, The Journal of Risk and Insurance... "The unavailability of a firearm then would reduce the fatality rate of firearm suicides from 96.5 percent to 22.42 percent [overall] for males, and from 96 percent to 5.99 percent [overall] for females" http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms/wp-con...eanLemaire.pdf (note, he is taking into account other methods and substitution).

    This is like putting seat belts into a car.

    ((At least the American Nursing Association, Canadian Federation for Nursing Unions, and the Nurse/Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy recognize this and are making a difference re D.C. lawmaking))






    This is exactly why guns are harmful - they propel an "all or nothing" attitude... 100% success or 100% failure, alive or dead... false dilemma fallacy... as seen in this post.

    People are so blind, they cannot see it... There has to be something done. At 30,000 gun-related deaths a year this adds up to 2,370,000 deaths (times 79, 2012-1933) since 1933 (first year it was recorded). This is as large as to be called genocide... a strong and suitable word for a horrific, atrocious amount.... When people look at this number or anything related to gun-deaths, they just bat their eye, as if it was nothing. Any statistics, any graphs, any facts, any comparisions to ourselves to countries around the world.. the 65 countries leading us in managing this, goes in one ear... and out another...

    Also, re: registration... In Canada all long guns are required to be registered... this is one thing the Canadian Federation of Nursing Unions is strongly supporting in the previous post with persuasive and masterful ethos, pathos, and logos.
    Do you realize using your own number of 30,000 gun deaths a year that equates to 0.01% of the population? I wonder how many of those 30,000 were killed in the commission of a criminal activity, i.e. gang bangers killing each other off?
  12. Visit  InfirmiereJolie profile page
    HM-8404, according to the National Gang Center of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, gang-related homicides only count for about 2,000 (12%, meaning a ginormous 88% of gun-homicides are by those who are not gang members) out of all homicides (and 15,000 of all homicides are gun-related, meaning nearly all homicides are by gun). Even with all of these gang-related homicides being theoretically gun-related (some statistics show they nearly all are by gun as well, as overall), this is only 2,000 out of the 30,000 gun-related deaths... meaning merely .06% of gun-deaths are gang-related.

    Even if gang-related violence was completely 100% eliminated, there would STILL be 28,000 gun-related deaths per year. Computing from the time gun-related deaths were first published (1933), with the subtraction of the substitution of gang-related firearm homicides.... this would still horrifyingly... add up to 2,212,000 gun-related, un-called for, cruel deaths... still an atrocious genocide and an abomination against humanity... a strong word for a large, devastating amount.

    Source:
    Measuring the Extent of Gang Problems "The total number of gang homicides reported by respondents in the NYGS sample averaged nearly 2,000 annually from 2006 to 2010. During the same time period, the FBI estimated, on average, more than 16,000 homicides across the United States (www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2010/crime-in-the-u.s.-2010/tables/10tbl01.xls). These estimates suggest that gang-related homicides typically accounted for around 12 percent of all homicides annually."

    Also, most of those statistics are from 2012 and 2011. I see none on the list I gave which are from 1993. If one looks at the research, while other countries have implemented considerable regulation and control early on, lowering their numbers of deaths and increasing their life-spans (we fall far behind on overall life-span as well.. Jean Lamaire is keen on this having, partly, to do with our revolting number gun-related deaths... as he wrote in the Journal of Risk and Insurance), we have failed to do anything, accounting for nearly static, epidemic numbers in comparison.... an embarrassment on the world stage and catastrophic for our people.

    Quote from HM-8404
    Interesting information. Am I the only one that noticed something the top countries, including the US, have in common? Two things actually. They all have major drug problems and they also have major gang problems.

    Why would Sweden, Finland, Qatar, etc have a lot of gun deaths, they don't have the same social problems as us. They don't have armed gangs killing each other over turf to sell their drugs. But we do, just like Mexico and Colombia. Yeah, banning guns would solve that problem in a week or two.

    Did you also notice how old some of these statistics are? They go back as far as 1993.
    Quote from HM-8404
    Do you realize using your own number of 30,000 gun deaths a year that equates to 0.01% of the population? I wonder how many of those 30,000 were killed in the commission of a criminal activity, i.e. gang bangers killing each other off?

    Quote from Wile E Coyote
    Ah ,the lovely Canadian gun registry. Perhaps you'd be interested to know that the gun registry has been dismantled due to it's resounding failure and unjustified expense.
    In Canada, this was a partisanship issue (by a minority party at this... which remarkably was elected), controversial and heated, half or more of the country is against it. The registration could be replaced shorty by a majority, not minority, party (already it is being an issue for the opposing side)... Most importantly, healthcare professionals (such as the Canadian Federation of Nursing Unions) and law enforcement are completely against the changes. Contrary to this post, according to statistics attained by the Canadian Federation of Nursing Unions, in their letter to the Canadian Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, their controls have been successful, with a 43% decrease in gun-related deaths.

    "In April 2010, CFNU [Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions] joined Canadian healthcare organizations, such as the Canadian Association for Adolescent Health, the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, the Canadian
    Paediatric Society, the Canadian Public Health Association and many others in releasing a joint statement on the gun control and the long gun registry.


    Why? Because over the years, members of the health community have fought for stronger controls
    on firearms.

    Why? Because of the staggering burden of preventable gun death and injury: almost 1400
    Canadians died of gunshots in 1991, close to half the number killed in automobile crashes.
    The vast majority of firearm deaths in Canada are not gang related but occur when an ordinary
    citizen becomes suicidal or violent, often under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or during a
    personal crisis such as marital breakdown or job loss. We also know that when firearms are
    available, domestic homicides are more likely to involve multiple victims and end in suicide.

    We are therefore encouraged to see positive results since the latest waves of legislative reforms. In
    2005, there were 818 firearms related deaths in Canada. This represents an astonishing decrease of 43% of all gun deaths since 1991.

    Health organizations fought to pass improvements to the law in 1991 as well as in 1995. Scientific research shows that progressive controls on firearms have resulted in a reduction in firearm death and injury. Canada's law has been cited as a model of effective legislation worldwide, particularly
    in combating violence against women. It is also consistent with global norms including the
    recently announced European Firearms Directive which establishes uniform standards for all
    European Union countries and includes the registration of all firearms.

    As health professionals, we know the importance of investing in prevention, whether in road
    safety or prevention of infectious diseases. It is true that one cannot easily measure prevention, but we can certainly measure the effects of ignoring it.
    To our knowledge, six different coroners'
    inquests recommended the licensing of gun owners and registration of all firearms. Indeed, our
    daily practice informs us of the very real risks associated with firearms and of the value of a strong gun control law.


    Health and safety is a key concern of our work as a union as well as our work as health
    professionals.Ensuring health and safety is about identifying and mitigating risk. We know that registration reduces risk of firearm related injury and death.

    As nurses, as women, as trade unionists, CFNU urges the Senate Committee to recommend
    against the passage of Bill C-19.
    "
    The Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions, another portion from the letter sent to the Canadian Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs http://www.nursesunions.ca/sites/def...ch_28_2012.pdf

    Even with this change (strongly against health professionals' and law-enforcements' recommendations and urges for the laws continuity)...Canada still has more restrictive laws than the USA.

    "[Prime Minister of Canada Stephan] Harper said it's worth remembering that Canada has a stronger, stricter gun control system than exists in the United States, even without the long-gun registry.

    "We will not change the basis of this system. Actually, we have reinforced certain parts," he said.

    Harper said Canada continues to require gun licences and that handguns and restricted weapons be registered.


    "We will keep this system that works." Canada's gun controls 'work,' Harper says in wake of Newtown - Politics - CBC News

    All other firearms in Canada still need to be registered, even with these changes.
  13. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    HM-8404, according to the National Gang Center of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, gang-related homicides only count for about 2,000 (12%, meaning a ginormous 88% of gun-homicides are by those who are not gang members) out of all homicides (and 15,000 of all homicides are gun-related, meaning nearly all homicides are by gun). Even with all of these gang-related homicides being theoretically gun-related (some statistics show they nearly all are by gun as well, as overall), this is only 2,000 out of the 30,000 gun-related deaths... meaning merely .06% of gun-deaths are gang-related.


    I said in the commission of a crime such as a gang banger. You say MERELY 0.06% of gun deaths are gang related. If 0.06% is considered merely what do you consider 0.01%?


    Even if gang-related violence was completely 100% eliminated, there would STILL be 28,000 gun-related deaths per year. Computing from the time gun-related deaths were first published (1933), with the subtraction of the substitution of gang-related firearm homicides.... this would still horrifyingly... add up to 2,212,000 gun-related, un-called for, cruel deaths... still an atrocious genocide and an abomination against humanity... a strong word for a large, devastating amount.


    In your 80 year example how many people were killed by tobacco, alcohol, or automobile accidents? I guess guns just look more scary than a bottle of Miller Lite, or a Chevy Malibu.


    Source:
    Measuring the Extent of Gang Problems "The total number of gang homicides reported by respondents in the NYGS sample averaged nearly 2,000 annually from 2006 to 2010. During the same time period, the FBI estimated, on average, more than 16,000 homicides across the United States (www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2010/crime-in-the-u.s.-2010/tables/10tbl01.xls). These estimates suggest that gang-related homicides typically accounted for around 12 percent of all homicides annually."

    Also, most of those statistics are from 2012 and 2011. I see none on the list I gave which are from 1993. If one looks at the research, while other countries have implemented considerable regulation and control early on, lowering their numbers of deaths and increasing their life-spans (we fall far behind on overall life-span as well.. Jean Lamaire is keen on this having, partly, to do with our revolting number gun-related deaths... as he wrote in the Journal of Risk and Insurance), we have failed to do anything, accounting for nearly static, epidemic numbers in comparison.... an embarrassment on the world stage and catastrophic for our people.

    So guns are the reason for shorter life expectancy in the US rather than Big Macs and our processed food addiction? Come on, be serious.

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