worried will documented back condition prevent rn job in the future?!

  1. 0
    Okay I am currently a CNA in a LTC facility.
    I am starting my prereqs for nursing school in Jan.

    When I was hired at the LTC facility to be trained as a CNA (they provided training) they tried to "unhire" me because they found out I had a documented back condition. I fought it and eventually got the job, though they were not suppose to hire anyone wiht a back problem. I had to disclose it.. they specifically asked about any back problems.

    I ended up getting the job through the grace of god...
    but is this going to haunt me into my RN days? At this point I am more then compitent to do my job. I hope that I never have the pain and problems I had for awhile.. but who knows.

    Anyone have experience with this type of thing?
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    If not asked the question, don't volunteer the information. If forced to provide the information, also provide a doctor's statement that you are fit for the job. Every year or two years when my health statement is due, the doctor signs a statement on the form indicating that I am fit to perform my job duties. Just as simple as that.
  5. 0
    hmm - you have a difficult challenge, that's for sure.

    Your pre-existing back problem may not prevent you from becoming an RN, but will it have an impact on your ability to actually care for patients? That's probably the issue you need to consider. It may just mean that you have to be particular about the organization you work for. Let me explain a bit. Back safety programs, including complete 'no lift' environments are becoming more prevalent because of the high incidence of back injury among nurses. Your back problems should present no problem if you go to work in one of those organizations.

    If you go to work in an environment that does not provide lift equipment, you will have to either compromise patient care or put your own health in danger. Just my thoughts . . .
  6. 0
    Quote from rbezemek
    hmm - you have a difficult challenge, that's for sure.

    Your pre-existing back problem may not prevent you from becoming an RN, but will it have an impact on your ability to actually care for patients? That's probably the issue you need to consider. It may just mean that you have to be particular about the organization you work for. Let me explain a bit. Back safety programs, including complete 'no lift' environments are becoming more prevalent because of the high incidence of back injury among nurses. Your back problems should present no problem if you go to work in one of those organizations.

    If you go to work in an environment that does not provide lift equipment, you will have to either compromise patient care or put your own health in danger. Just my thoughts . . .
    I would never take a job that did not provide lift equipment. Not no way not no how! However it really isn't an issue around here as most places are owned by the same company and they are a "no lift".
    My patients are not compromised by me now as a CNA with a back problem. As long as I can get the job I would not take anything I could not handle.

    But what is going to make them believe me that I can do the job.
    Hopefully my training and experience as a CNA helps.
  7. 0
    If your doctor provides the medical statement then there is no discussion, unless you let someone draw you in where they should not go. If they contradict the doctor's written evaluation of your abilities, then you would have grounds to seek redress under one of the disability laws. They would not be discussing anything along these lines if you don't bring the subject up first. Nobody has every questioned me about my physical ability to do the job. They always discuss my experience and my knowledge about what I am doing. Keep on topic during your interview and don't volunteer information so that you can be discriminated against.
  8. 0
    Caliotter. thanks for the reply
    I do not have a doctors statement... I am not currently seeing anyone about my back and the specialist I had last moved to california or some other state far far away! lol My PT did sign a release for me tog et hte job I currently have as a CNA and actually my back is better then it was before I was a CNA. The surgon told me that walking on flat ground was the best thing I could do... and that is what I do all day at work (my previous job I sat in a chair)

    In my last jobn I did not tell them about my back untill they asked specifically if I had a documented back problem(which I did). I did not lie but I tried to make it sound as minute as possible... and still almost didnt get the job!

    Hopefully I have no more back flair ups and by the time I get done with school my back problem will be an old issue!!!
  9. 0
    Remember, that whatever job you get, you have to be very, very careful not to injure yourself. Never let fear of losing a job force you into an unsafe act. And I would be pushing very hard to get the credentials and experience required to get a job where your back health is not a factor or is easily accommodated.
  10. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    If your doctor provides the medical statement then there is no discussion, unless you let someone draw you in where they should not go. If they contradict the doctor's written evaluation of your abilities, then you would have grounds to seek redress under one of the disability laws. They would not be discussing anything along these lines if you don't bring the subject up first. Nobody has every questioned me about my physical ability to do the job. They always discuss my experience and my knowledge about what I am doing. Keep on topic during your interview and don't volunteer information so that you can be discriminated against.
    Firstly, any such medical evaluation statement conducted by any physician is not somehow intended to function as a free passport to acquire any job position of your choosing.

    This is a health and safety matter involving potential liability for the hiring facility involved.

    My Best,


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