nurses that take anxiety meds nurses that take anxiety meds - pg.3 | allnurses

nurses that take anxiety meds - page 3

I was recently prescribed clonazepam 0.5mg @ bedtime for severe anxiety. I started it over the weekend to measure my reaction. So far I am more relaxed, have more energy, and have an easier time... Read More

  1. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    To me, the Tramadol will be much more troublesome than the Klonopin. Tramadol shows up on an opiate screen and the question will raised is how can you expect to survive in clinical nursing if you're in such severe pain that is requires a narcotic? I work with nurses in recovery. Tramadol IS an addicting drug.
  2. Visit  up'n'coming profile page
    0
    I'm a new grad looking for work in another state, so the stress is already high for me. I have HIV (20+ years and totally healthy with T-cells > 800 and viral load undetectable ). I take Atripla, which can make me nauseous, so my doc prescribed Marinol 5 mg nightly with my Atripla, and alprazolam 0.5 mg nightly (to keep me from waking at 0200 with anxiety, which was a regular occurrence). I don't want to disclose, as I don't think it's important to my practice, but worry about testing + in my UA. If I take my prescription with me to the testing facility, do they take note of it and not relay the test results to the hiring manager, or do they report a positive test and mention that I have a prescription? I would not like to live through the nausea for the next month just to pass a UA.
  3. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from subee
    To me, the Tramadol will be much more troublesome than the Klonopin. Tramadol shows up on an opiate screen and the question will raised is how can you expect to survive in clinical nursing if you're in such severe pain that is requires a narcotic? I work with nurses in recovery. Tramadol IS an addicting drug.
    Tramadol is not a narcotic; it is not a DEA controlled substance. There is a small chance of cross-reactivity on opiate screening but it typically does not cause a positive opiate result on a screen as it is not an opiate.
  4. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    0
    Quote from MunoRN
    Tramadol is not a narcotic; it is not a DEA controlled substance.
    In a few states, tramadol is a schedule IV controlled substance...but that's under state law.

    It does have a significant abuse potential though: I have had to deal with patients who were detoxing from it. And a lot of facilities will treat it as though it is controlled and require counting, logs, etc., because it is often diverted.
  5. Visit  agrayRN profile page
    1
    Definitely not! It's so sad that there is a stigma against people with anxiety and depression at your workplace. It's just something that some people have to deal with on a daily basis. Some people just can't cope with it as well as others, I am one of them. I take Buspar twice daily and Xanax prn. It doesn't change who I am, it just helps me work more effectively. I'm sure it's the same way with you. So they don't need to know!
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  6. Visit  SillyStudent profile page
    0
    I have Panic Disorder, for which I am on a cocktail of medications, and it is thankfully reasonably well controlled. On the last two drug tests I took for pre-employment, I was positive for benzo's and tricyclics at the very least. I got a call from the 'Medical Review Officer'. I gave Walgreens and my Physician written permission to release my info. Then I was hired. BOTH times. Your prescribed medications are between you and HR. Having said that, I ALWAYS disclose that I have panic disorder on the medical form. No one has ever asked me about it, and I have never been turned down for a job when I got past the interview and to the physical. I am fairly sure none of my direct supervisors have even known about my medications or my medical conditions unless I told them.

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