nurses that take anxiety meds - page 3

by forgivenfaith119

13,110 Views | 31 Comments

I was recently prescribed clonazepam 0.5mg @ bedtime for severe anxiety. I started it over the weekend to measure my reaction. So far I am more relaxed, have more energy, and have an easier time focusing on my work. Am I required... Read More


  1. 0
    I don't say anything and I always write "no meds" on any forms...as for the employers getting to know if you have a legal Rx is bull. The testing agencies must keep your confidence about what you take. A legal Rx ensures that the report back to the employer is a negative one. Believe me it happened to me and I went legal of them. I got compensated from the employer, the drug company that blabbed to the employer big time and got my job back to boot. I'm sure that's the last time that drug testing place tells any employers anything unless they are absolutely sure of what they're doing.

    As for the ones that say honesty is the best policy...in this case; it's just plain suicide.

    PS...only disclose to the doc that calls from the drug testing place to find out what Rx/Rxs you take. Nothing has to be written down. Confidentiality is key.
  2. 1
    Quote from Over-the-hill-Nurse
    I agree with the above posts. DON'T SAY ANYTHING! It will only cost you in the end. I was honest and it only got me removed from a job after 21 years and reported to the board. Which is still under review. Your personal life is your own. You are better off not saying anything to anyone that involves your personal life outside of where you work. It is not any of their business. I thought after the years I put in that I was safe. Sad part is the joke was on me...
    I agree to not say anything to your employer or co workers, but I would disclose it at the time of the urine test. I hope HIPPA protect any nurse. That is why I never would have my surgery or procedures done at the hospital I work. Some nurses are already cruel to each other, they don't need another reason to riddicule you. I took care of a nurse who also presently worked with us only to hear snide remarks about her medication list which had an antidepressant and antianxiety on it. I personally never saw a question about what type of meds you are taking on an employment application. Hope I never will....
    little1rn10 likes this.
  3. 0
    I agree with cfsleo812. Even though you are working with other nurses, sometimes things are better left unsaid. I would however, disclose all medications at the time of random drug screenings. While I was working on the floor a medication list was required and my director had to sign it (HIPPA?). There was a time when I was trying to find the right medication for myself and I didn't want my director to know everything; I didn't change my list. :redpinkhe
  4. 0
    Does anyone know if screening companies ask for a med list before a Pre-employment health screening or just if there is a UA positive? I don't want to have to disclose my prescribed, low dose, clonazepam for fear I won't get a hired.
  5. 0
    Quote from Underdog43
    Does anyone know if screening companies ask for a med list before a Pre-employment health screening or just if there is a UA positive? I don't want to have to disclose my prescribed, low dose, clonazepam for fear I won't get a hired.
    I can understand your concern, as having a prescription is not bullet-proof protection against a positive UDS. I can't say there's a right or wrong answer as to how you should handle it though...though IMO, I tend to lean on the side of disclosure before the test, because if your test did pop positive the company may not give you the chance to explain it.

    For one facility, I was required to list all medications before taking the test...and I did, even anything that was schedule. For the other, I asked and was told I didn't need to list them beforehand, but if I tested positive that I would have to provide valid prescriptions. No issue with either test.
  6. 0
    Don't say any thing unless you are asked. You said that there is a stigma in your workplace related to staff with anxiety/depression, so don't bother mentioning it.
  7. 0
    To me, the Tramadol will be much more troublesome than the Klonopin. Tramadol shows up on an opiate screen and the question will raised is how can you expect to survive in clinical nursing if you're in such severe pain that is requires a narcotic? I work with nurses in recovery. Tramadol IS an addicting drug.
  8. 0
    I'm a new grad looking for work in another state, so the stress is already high for me. I have HIV (20+ years and totally healthy with T-cells > 800 and viral load undetectable ). I take Atripla, which can make me nauseous, so my doc prescribed Marinol 5 mg nightly with my Atripla, and alprazolam 0.5 mg nightly (to keep me from waking at 0200 with anxiety, which was a regular occurrence). I don't want to disclose, as I don't think it's important to my practice, but worry about testing + in my UA. If I take my prescription with me to the testing facility, do they take note of it and not relay the test results to the hiring manager, or do they report a positive test and mention that I have a prescription? I would not like to live through the nausea for the next month just to pass a UA.
  9. 0
    Quote from subee
    To me, the Tramadol will be much more troublesome than the Klonopin. Tramadol shows up on an opiate screen and the question will raised is how can you expect to survive in clinical nursing if you're in such severe pain that is requires a narcotic? I work with nurses in recovery. Tramadol IS an addicting drug.
    Tramadol is not a narcotic; it is not a DEA controlled substance. There is a small chance of cross-reactivity on opiate screening but it typically does not cause a positive opiate result on a screen as it is not an opiate.
  10. 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    Tramadol is not a narcotic; it is not a DEA controlled substance.
    In a few states, tramadol is a schedule IV controlled substance...but that's under state law.

    It does have a significant abuse potential though: I have had to deal with patients who were detoxing from it. And a lot of facilities will treat it as though it is controlled and require counting, logs, etc., because it is often diverted.


Top