Nurses struggling with mental illness - page 22

I was just wondering if there are any other nurses who struggle with mental illness. It seems to be one disability that is met with little tolerance and support in the medical field. I do have major... Read More

  1. by   geekgolightly
    let things come as they may. I get super stressed just like you thinking of possible future scenarios, and the best way i have found to deal with that, is to try and calm my mind deep breathing and telling myself that I will face it when it comes. No amount of planning will do any good when it comes to things like "will I be able to handle X, Y or Z??" Just let go what you have no control over and breathe deep and tell yourself that you have the ability to deal with it when it comes. Don't let possible futures deter you from going for it!
  2. by   krisssy
    I read this somewhere on allnurses.com, and I have it on a post it on my desk lamp. "Let go of what may come. Let go of what is happening now. Don't try to figure anything out. Don't try to make anything happen. Relax, right now, and rest." Krisssy RN MA:angel2:
  3. by   Meerkat
    *Raising Hand*
    Yep, Major Depression, PTSD, Social Anxiety.

    I'm a psych nurse, and I I really like it. I find that many of my colleagues are open about psych probs they have had, and it's refreshing and I feel accepted.

    Good Luck.
  4. by   krisssy
    Meerkat,
    ditto-PTSD followed by major depression and social anxiety. Thank you thank you for making ME feel accepted as a future psych nurse despite what I have been through personally. It is nurses like you who keep me going toward my goal of eventually helping others who have suffered and help me gain confidence in my ability to learn and make a difference in people's lives. I know I will be good at it, because it means so much to me. I only hope I get a job in a place where people share honestly as you have described your workplace. How wonderful for you and your fellow nurses!:wink2: Krisssy RN MA
  5. by   Meerkat
    Quote from krisssy
    Meerkat,
    ditto-PTSD followed by major depression and social anxiety. Thank you thank you for making ME feel accepted as a future psych nurse despite what I have been through personally. It is nurses like you who keep me going toward my goal of eventually helping others who have suffered and help me gain confidence in my ability to learn and make a difference in people's lives. I know I will be good at it, because it means so much to me. I only hope I get a job in a place where people share honestly as you have described your workplace. How wonderful for you and your fellow nurses!:wink2: Krisssy RN MA

    Hang in there, Krisssy! Keep going...you'll be an even BETTER psych nurse, BECAUSE of your experience!
  6. by   dthfytr
    All through Nursing School, my fellow students and I all just KNEW we had whatever we were studying that day. Amazingly we all lived through it and took our boards (back in the paper and pencil days).

    I'm proud of my skills and experience in nursing, plus I can fill in the circles on Lottery tickets far faster than people who spend their time taking computerized tests.
    Last edit by dthfytr on Nov 22, '05
  7. by   VeryPlainJane
    Quote from dthfytr
    All through Nursing School, my fellow students and I all just KNEW we had whatever we were studying that day. Amazingly we all lived through it and took our boards (back in the paper and pencil days).

    I'm proud of my skills and experience in nursing, plus I can fill in the circles on Lottery tickets far faster than people who spend their time taking computerized tests.
    I remember when I was 12, there were all these commercials warning people about prostate cancer on TV...I swore up and down I had all the symptoms. I just knew I was dieing. My family will never let me live it down. :selfbonk:
  8. by   hbncns35
    Hi-
    I think this is the most posted thread on the board!!!! People who have mental illness are some of the most courageous indviduals I know. I recently applied for more time on my nursing tests. Basically the teachers just know I am on medication that could produce memory recall problems. So I have noticed that some of them have been more supportive in some ways. They are still tough on you in clinical but I accept that. I think you learn more that way. I have approached my curriculum board in hopes that they consider a course on Empathy like many other Ivy league schools have adopted for their doctors. Nurses need it as well. I developed a nursing course outline based on knowledge that I have acquired from struggling with my illness. I am handing in the outline and a letter to this instructor describing that I have overcome two major life threatening illnesses () and have learned many painstaking lessons that enabled me to write such a course. It certainly is a risk but I am willing to take it, make a stand and follow through with my own self intact. I believe has made me strong and that if I can withstand what I have already been through then I can also withstand a bad ignorant attitude. I am not in to hiding. If we all hide under will never be on the map. I have never known a situation to weaken me, I only see challenges such as this that could benefit myself and others involved. Sometimes growing is a painstaking process but I am not one to pity myself or stress myself out because someone somewhere doesn't think I belong. Let them try to stop me - I will just pull out all my and the attorneys to get all over their case. I wouldn't do it unless I had a back up plan and I am not willing to be walked over and pushed aside. I understand that I may make many nurses uncomfortable by speaking out but you know that's for the therapists to pick up the pieces if there are any that arise in these instructors as a result of my coming out. I am in a strong place mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. HB
    Last edit by hbncns35 on Feb 10, '06
  9. by   krisssy
    Quote from hbncns35
    Hi-
    I think this is the most posted thread on the board!!!! People who have mental illness are some of the most courageous indviduals I know. Myself included. I recently applied for more time on my nursing tests. Basically the teachers just know I am on medication that could produce memory recall problems. So I have noticed that some of them have been more supportive in some ways. They are still tough on you in clinical but I accept that. I think you learn more that way. I have approached my curriculum board in hopes that they consider a course on Empathy like many other Ivy league schools have adopted for their doctors. Nurses need it as well. I developed a nursing course outline based on knowledge that I have acquired from struggling with my mental illness. I am handing in the outline and a letter to this instructor describing that I have overcome two major life threatening illnesses (bp and AN) and have learned many painstaking lessons that enabled me to write such a course. It certainly is a risk but I am willing to take it, make a stand and follow through with my own self intact. I believe my MI has made me strong and that if I can withstand what I have already been through then I can also withstand a bad ignorant attitude. I am not in to hiding. If we all hide under MI, then MI will never be on the map. I have never known a situation to weaken me, I only see challenges such as this that could benefit myself and others involved. Sometimes growing is a painstaking process but I am not one to pity myself or stress myself out because someone somewhere doesn't think I belong. Let them try to stop me - I will just pull out all my mental health resources and the attorneys to get all over their case. I wouldn't do it unless I had a back up plan and I am not willing to be walked over and pushed aside. I understand that I may make many nurses uncomfortable by speaking out but you know that's for the therapists to pick up the pieces if there are any emotional disturbances that arise in these instructors as a result of my coming out. I am in a strong place mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. Let the rain come down- I have practiced with adversity and overcome that too. HB
    Thank you so much for sharing your strength. Your strength has given me strength, as I think people with the same illnesses can help eachother so much. There is so much empathy there. I was wondering what bp (bi polar or borderline personality?) and AN stand for ?? I think your ideas for approaching your school are wonderful. A course in empathy for nurses would be awesome. In my home growing up -and as a mother myself, problems were always hidden. It was not good. Mental illness is just an illness like any other illness. There are still many nurses who see it as a stigma-unfortunately. Thank you again. I really respect what you say. Krisssy RN MA-going for MS in Psych starting this winter -can't wait to learn everything I can !
  10. by   hbncns35
    Krissy-
    AN stands for Anorexia Nervosa in which I nearly starved myself near death. I was a typical teenager who wanted to look good, had psychological problems with my image and my perfectionistic qualities and my relationship with my mother. I had to do some serious soul searching and with the help of many therapy interventions I changed the way I viewed myself, my relationship with food and my relationship with my mother. I was doing this at the same time I found out I was bipolar - that's another thread all together for another time. Gotta run and get those endorphins going - On my way to romp around at Curves!!!! See ya - HB
  11. by   dthfytr
    ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, REMEMBER;

    "Everybody is normal until you get to know them."
  12. by   DutchgirlRN
    I am on a 6 wks LOA now due to Major Depression or Job Burnout. Either definition fits. It happened to me 16 years ago also. That was before I was on any antidepressants. At that time I didn't have any idea what was wrong and took 2 years off. Recovery is much faster with chemical help.
  13. by   dthfytr
    Dutchgirl, above all else, be gentle with yourself. I hope you get well soon. Isn't it a shame that major depression can go on for so long and not be diagnosed? I always wonder how many others are out there in pain and not getting the help they need. IMHO, I bet we see a lot of them on the evening news.
    Last edit by P_RN on Nov 24, '05

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