Nurses With Disabilities: Getting What You Need So You Can Give Your Best - page 3

by VivaLasViejas Guide | 9,791 Views | 32 Comments

It was the nightmare every long-term care nurse manager dreads: the exit interview with a state survey team that has just inspected every inch of the building and every piece of nursing documentation produced over the past... Read More


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    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    I can't help but wondering if the patient's suffered due to your issues? I appreciate your honesty but if patient's suffered due your lack of attention, I don't think you should be in this position.
    Well G's Mom, it's good that you left yourself an out there, with "...if patient's suffered due your lack of attention..." because I really don't know of too many Nurse Managers that give all that much direct patient care, and by the time any pertinent issues get to her desk, chances of a patient suffering from lack of action would be fairly nil. That's the beauty of being insulated by charge nurses, and supervisors. You obviously know little about Nursing Administration and Management. When you get to this stage of your career, your role is more in handling the nurses and the administrative activity within the Facility, rather than the patients. You are still responsible for the patients, but not in a hands on capacity. Personally, I hated it and couldn't wait to get back to doing actual patient care.
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    Quote from FMF Corpsman
    Well G's Mom, it's good that you left yourself an out there, with "...if patient's suffered due your lack of attention..." because I really don't know of too many Nurse Managers that give all that much direct patient care, and by the time any pertinent issues get to her desk, chances of a patient suffering from lack of action would be fairly nil. That's the beauty of being insulated by charge nurses, and supervisors. You obviously know little about Nursing Administration and Management. When you get to this stage of your career, your role is more in handling the nurses and the administrative activity within the Facility, rather than the patients. You are still responsible for the patients, but not in a hands on capacity. Personally, I hated it and couldn't wait to get back to doing actual patient care.
    I have been a nurse double the time Viva has been. I was taught that nursing documentation is part of patient care and the state concurs with me. Her managers and supervisors did not compensate for her short comings which is unfortunate.

    Viva has not had her disability in check the last year, hopefully she can work with her employer to work out her situation. The article was a good heads up to all to keep their health ( mental and physical) in good control. She is lucky no patient was harmed, now she has move forward and fix all the deficiencies. Best of Luck Viva and thanks for article it is a reality check for all who have issues.
    Fiona59 and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    You provide some excellent suggestions for those with disabilities. Not everyone's disability is a physical one that can be seen. I commend you for being honest and not using your disability as a crutch. Kudos for having supportive supervisors and a good end result.
    FMF Corpsman and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    I can't help but wondering if the patient's suffered due to your issues? I appreciate your honesty but if patient's suffered due your lack of attention, I don't think you should be in this position.

    I saw on Vivaís Blog where she had taken responsibility for six of the deficiencies, but never where she noted exactly what those deficiencies were for. Do you have a special knowledge that provides you the information? Or are you simply operating on the special ability granted you by, Quote having twice the experience of Viva, Unquote. I don't see any other special abilities or interest, I don't see where you work, All I see is that you are married to a Non-Christian and you are put off when people assume you aren't a Christian as well. That and you have racial issues. I have 35 plus years in Nursing and I wasn't able to discern what the particular deficiencies were for. Sometimes people take the blame for things that really aren't their fault. Unless you are her immediate Supervisor, I don't really see how you are in a position to say whether her staff either were or were not in a position to compensate for any alleged shortcomings.

    You really have no business calling anyone on their shortcomings. Viva brought a very well written blog to us and laid bare her feelings, and offered suggestions on how others who might suffer from a similar malady or be in a like situation might handle it, and you, as if you never farted in the bathtub, jumped in with both feet to tell her how wrong she had been and that she should just quit. Do you want to compare education and experience, maybe then we can decide who gets to tell who where to go and how far. I'll bet you I win. You don't get to decide whose disability is in check and whose isn't. You aren't a Practitioner, you arenít her Doctor, and you most certainly are not her. Those are the type of decisions she gets to make. Period. What you said in your original blog was rude and inappropriate. I couldn't let them slide. If I get thrown off the site for calling you on it, so be it. Once again, I don't play politically correct, I'm too old, and there's not enough time.
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    I didn't realize it when I posted this article, but this week, coincidentally, is Mental Illness Awareness Week. Amid all the pink ribbons, football cleats, and T-shirts commemorating Breast Cancer Awareness Month, this little-known but far more widespread public health concern is still being stuffed away, as it always does, in the closet of our national consciousness.

    Please join with me in raising awareness about psychiatric disorders and de-stigmatizing the millions of Americans who suffer from these often-debilitating conditions.
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    Viva, thank you so much for your inspring and sincere post! I am an RN with more than just one disability. I was on unemployment for a full year before finding a great job with the flexible hours I desperately needed in order to be at my functional best along with a manager who is fully aware of my diagnosis'. I fully agree with every word about being honest about who you are so you can give your best... I searched high and low for a job and was consistently turned down for positions I was more than qualified for. I was told someone with "more" experience etc. got the job. I was SO distraught and discouraged. I was not going to settle for just any job to only be set up for failure. God works in mysterious ways. 2 weeks before unemplyment ran out. This wonderful job I now have came along just in the nick of time. I think the hardest part of it all was being honest with myself about my limitations and really finding things I AM good at and being grateful for them. My diasability is not something I've had all my life. Coming to terms with my new self and finding a good fit for me has been a very humbling journey. Again Viva, thank you for your post
    FMF Corpsman and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    Amen Corpsman!!! Thank you
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
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    Quote from hindsight2020RN
    Amen Corpsman!!! Thank you
    I call em like I see em, Don't like people to take liberties thay aren't entitled to.
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    Having a disability (or two) does not necessarily render one unintelligent, non-compassionate, irresponsible or a host of other "stigmas" that may come along with the word disabled. This is when you really put your critical thinking skills to the test and figure it all out. We have to sometimes over compensate in some areas it's true. But those of us who own our shortcomings and or limitations and can still be very productive, efficient, positive and all around great nurses , or Nurse leaders inspite of it all, I applaud you! Things may not always run as smoothly, or come as easily as they would to other Nurses. As long as we maintain our ethics, never forget the pledge we took and do some checking and double checking if need be. That just means we have to work a little harder and rest a little more if need be. It all evens out.

    "Never judge someone unless you have walked a mile in their shoes"
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    I think you are missing my point, Viva took a bold move posting her shortcomings here.......it is a service to all. Viva is the one who post her short comings here not me. I don't have the details and not familiar with state law, but in my state have this number of issues could cause a place to loose their license. She is lucky her employer is not reporting to the Board of Nursing, which personally I don't think is indicated but not all employers are as generous or proactive as her employer. I don't need, don't want any more details not needed . But I am assuming Viva posted this to educate all on disabilities visible or not, in that light I have posted my comments since her premise is to educate that this situation could have had a very different outcome. I am not being critical but trying to add to her conversation. I am not a perfect person, but common sense tells me Viva did not get the support she needed to over come her situation and her employer suffered.


    Mental Health is an illness, it sounds to me this incident is result on more than one bad day. It sounds like her illness was not in good control, shame on her employer for not noticing sooner, if someone had a visible issue it would have been dealt with ( someone with a weeping wound, chest pain, or vomiting) and been mandated to get medical attention.


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