New dx of "possible MS"

  1. 0
    Hi, Folks, this has been a interesting month for me to say the least... I earned my LPN less than two years ago, and work in peds home health. I developed optic neuritis earlier this month, and am currrently going for all sorts of tests, as MS is strongly suspected. I am worried and uncertain for my future now. I was planning on continuing for my RN, but don't want to commit until I know if this is what they think it is, and how my body will progress... or not. I have had no weakness or cognitive problems, simply loss of vision in one eye which has mostly recovered now d/t IV steriod tx. I currently have a client who weighs 60 lbs, and I do a manual transfer with her. I'm afraid to tell my employer because they'll insist I use the Hoyer, and the family is very resistant to that. I did tell the family everything and promised to tell them if I experience any muscle weakness. They are very supportive and don't want to lose me. Anyone working w MS and not telling their employer? Any comments, suggestions, etc. on how to ease into working life with MS? Not sure what my general idea here is for my post, just wanted to get it out there. Not sure what to do or how to feel.
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 4
    Hi,
    The thing about MS is that no one knows, not even the fancy MS specialists, how it will progress. The good news is that many people are able to live for years before developing any major problems.

    The pros of continuing on for your RN is that as you move further up the educational ladder the more opportunities you will have and the chances you can have a longer career with a lighter physical load.

    Many suggest not telling employers unless you need accomodations but of course disclosing during the pre-employment physical is usually necessary especially if you are going to use their health benefits. I wish you an easy road with MS or whatever it turns out to be. Get your affairs in order now with regard to LTC insurance etc. Take care, Jules
    Pfiesty, virgo,student nurse, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    I can not tell you how to try and work with ms, but I can offer some friendly support. If you are thinking of being a RN because you think you will not be lifting or walking, that is nott he case. If you work for a company that could possibly place you in a desk job, then I say go for it.
    I would limit what I tell people, until I know the whole story.
    My heart goes out to you and wish you the best of luck.
    I have taken care of many ms patients and the disease is hard to manage.
    Hopefully in the near future new research will discover new ways to help our ms patient. Montel could be a good source of support for you..he has a book out.
    Take care.
    Last edit by nurse.sandi on Apr 28, '11 : Reason: corrections
  5. 0
    You do have a full plate, there! I wouldn't stop with anything that you had planned to do before this came up - unless you have no choice.

    MS is very unpredictable. I think it's a little too soon to answer with certainty (re:lifting, etc) just wanted to offer best wishes throughout this process.

    I'm sure your mind is running a mile a minute {{cloudysue}} hugs

    Please update when you get a chance.
  6. 2
    cloudysue, i got my lpn in 94, my rn in 97 and was dx with ms in 2005. I had been working 12hr medsurg shifts that whole time, and was able to continue working my shifts until 2007. it took balance, no more than 2 shifts together, often 1, then 1 off. I got tired, and eventually couldnt pull 12hr shifts. i transferred to short stay and worked 8hr shifts until 2009 when other health issues made it so i couldnt work. i would love to talk to you more about what i did and how it feels and how to manage ms and working. email me..krispy1rn@sbcglobal.net

    kris
    Pfiesty and Esme12 like this.
  7. 1
    ((hugs)) You do not need to share your information with your employer unless you cannot do the job. Otherwise I would not tell anyone anything that could be used against me. I would say get your BSN if you are able. You could end up doing research, working a desk job, or case managment. Just make sure to have health insurance if you are able.
    Pfiesty likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from CloudySue
    Hi, Folks, this has been a interesting month for me to say the least... I earned my LPN less than two years ago, and work in peds home health. I developed optic neuritis earlier this month, and am currrently going for all sorts of tests, as MS is strongly suspected. I am worried and uncertain for my future now. I was planning on continuing for my RN, but don't want to commit until I know if this is what they think it is, and how my body will progress... or not. I have had no weakness or cognitive problems, simply loss of vision in one eye which has mostly recovered now d/t IV steriod tx. I currently have a client who weighs 60 lbs, and I do a manual transfer with her. I'm afraid to tell my employer because they'll insist I use the Hoyer, and the family is very resistant to that. I did tell the family everything and promised to tell them if I experience any muscle weakness. They are very supportive and don't want to lose me. Anyone working w MS and not telling their employer? Any comments, suggestions, etc. on how to ease into working life with MS? Not sure what my general idea here is for my post, just wanted to get it out there. Not sure what to do or how to feel.

    Don't tell your employer unless end up on some type of immunosupressive drug and only then if you have to take a physical for a new job. When I was first going throught the process of diagnosis (which ended up being a long drawn out process) iI looked to my "friends" at my job for support.........Big mistake...huge! Within in 6 months................I ended up being fired for poor performance and "not pulling my share of the work load" and not being a team player. (I had worked there for 10 years and never had a bad evaluation) and my "friends" at work treated me like I had the plague.

    I went to the next job and in orientation I was pulled out to the DON's office and "let go" because I was not forrthcomming in my interview which made me untrustworthy and did not pass my physical.....which is &%#$@#$^ (litigation pending).

    I finally did find a job and I worked an additional 10 years and recently went on disability because I cannot work because I can't walk and I have added a second auto-immune diagnosis.

    My suggestions...you don't need to share in your same job unlesss you are asking for accomodations.... Don't feel obligated to share....with anyone. REST is key.....listen to your body when feeling tired or weak. Stick to a regular schedule. Get disability insurance ASAP if you don't have it.....get mortage protection too. I have found acute care VERY intolerant to "sick" and disabled nurses but there are many other venues to explore.

    MS is scary but more people do well for a long peroid of time and very few become completely disabled quickly if at all!!!!

    God bless
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Jun 15, '11 : Reason: changed to all symbols
    Pfiesty likes this.
  9. 1
    I'm also in the process of being diagnosed with MS. I found out from an MRI that was done in the ER because I was having vertigo and they need to rule out stroke. Anyways, it showed many lesions suggestive of MS. I know I should keep this private but... I just couldn't keep it from my co-workers. At first my plan was not to but then I noticed I was getting paranoid that something might slip regarding MD appts or something. THen I read somewhere that if you have had years of good reviews and you know keeping a secret will make you crazy then it might be fine to disclose. Its such a small world out there and our city is not that huge... and then there is facebook and you just never know. I want the information to be on my terms. I'm just not the type a person that can keep this from my co-workers with whom I spend more hours than anyone else in my life communicating back and forth. I probably made the biggest mistake of my life but... I can't imagine how I could do it any other way.http://img.an-file.info/smilies/uhoh3.gif
    Pfiesty likes this.
  10. 2
    My experience with debilitating illness, was that when the employer found out, there went my livelihood. My advice is to keep this information away from the employer as long as you can do your job.
    Pfiesty and Esme12 like this.
  11. 1
    It's true that when I started you could expect for the most part for your employer not to be gunning for you as they often do now -- usually they wanted to actively support you but as Esme pointed out and a few other nurses who poured blood, sweat and tears into this profession have been royally shafted! Horrible.

    On the other hand every"culture" and personality is diferent. Annabel, don't worry yourself crazy over it -- just remember there is a difference between a voluntary admission of something and a situation coming up where you would be simply honestly answering a question if there is a reason for it - if you are anything like me I have a tendency to over-disclose.. why I'm not sure..

    Best wishes for the optimum results you seek both in your health and your career.
    ((Annabel)) ♡ ♡ ♡
    Esme12 likes this.


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