Looking for sub-specialt

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    Ok, what do you think about this, I am a 51 year old man who is trying to make my way through nursing school after having a stroke (cva) just over one and a half years ago. Last summer I went to school and became a CNA, and now I am going back to up grade to LVN, then R.N (I hope). I had a Left hemisphere and brain stem stroke from blood clots caused by A fib and severe obesity. I have lost 180 pounds and recovered my health (thank you God) I am a guest speaker for The American Hart Association, I speak to groups of nursing student and stroke survivors. I counsel stroke survivors and their families in the hospital. I have great hopes for the future. My thought process are still good, just slower and my speech is somewhat messed up (dysarthria not too bad though. Any thoughts, my grades are still good my cognitive skills are damaged somewhat and I need special accommodations in as much as I need multiple choice test as opposed to fill-in and short answers. I have weak short term memory, so that I need to write things down. My eye sight is injured in spots, that causes me problem on computer screens, (I read slower). Other than that Im cherry. Lol. Wondering what specialty I could pursue that does not require quick, high pressure decision making ability.
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    Welcome and congratulations on your recovery and plan. Hard to pick on a speciality as most have some element of high pressure. Do you have any interests in any speciality?
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    Silverdragon102, I would like to be an ER nurse but alas that is probably not in the cards anymore. I have/had some emergency medical training, (read EMT) and I love that area, but I would not want my life depending on a nurse with brain damage, no matter how minor. I have some emotional damage that I am working on overcoming, but I still don’t deal well with stressful situations. It is not to hard to make me flustered and cause me to cry ( oh geez), a side effect of the stroke. I am working on learning to control these problems but not all the way there yet. I am taking many psychology courses at the University where I am in my senior year, I am a psychology major along with most all of the nursing pre-recs already completed and wish to work with stroke survivors on a more professional level than that of a CNA. Perhaps a psych nurse. I just don’t know. My life partner and wife is a professor of nursing at the University here in town . She is truly a nurse extraordinaire, living and breathing nursing, more letters behind her name than most can even keep track of, and she is encouraging me to keep on trying, She thinks that if I don’t give up I will probably make it. Most of our friends have a phd, or MD. after their name and only want to encourage me. I personally think that they are patronizing me because of who my wife is. I am trying to do this on my own, at the junior college for my nursing degree. I even went to a college out of town to go through CNA school and take an EKG class last summer to prove that I did it on my own I am just looking for recommendations from less partial audiences
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    Well done on your plan and I do wish you all the best in whatever you decide on. Psych nurse maybe the way to go but not an area I know a lot about, you could always check out our various forums in the specialty tab and see what you can find happens in the various areas of nursing
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    Hi wolfe587,

    Kudo's for your strength and determination. After reading your first post it was very obvious to me that it appearred you enjoy working with stroke victims and families and in the recovery of their healthcare. And I bet you are very good at that.

    I understand "wanting" to continue to show your strengths ( and recognize your weaknesses as you mentioned) only in a higher level of education capacity.

    I believe what your wife tells you is true. Ask her, let her know that maybe you feel patrionized in this situation but just wanted to check. Then keep on keepin on. I'm sure there is a place in the recovery of stroke patients that only you could fill in the way you have already proven to yourself you enjoy.

    I am disabled as well and struggle the road everyday, many times doubting what I knew I could do (before) now. Make sense? It's the emotional thing I'm working on as well to get me to the place of return of comfort in my own shoes.

    I wish you the best.
    irehabu2 likes this.
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    Quote from wolfe5857
    Ok, what do you think about this, I am a 51 year old man who is trying to make my way through nursing school after having a stroke (cva) just over one and a half years ago. Last summer I went to school and became a CNA, and now I am going back to up grade to LVN, then R.N (I hope). I had a Left hemisphere and brain stem stroke from blood clots caused by A fib and severe obesity. I have lost 180 pounds and recovered my health (thank you God) I am a guest speaker for The American Hart Association, I speak to groups of nursing student and stroke survivors. I counsel stroke survivors and their families in the hospital. I have great hopes for the future. My thought process are still good, just slower and my speech is somewhat messed up (dysarthria not too bad though. Any thoughts, my grades are still good my cognitive skills are damaged somewhat and I need special accommodations in as much as I need multiple choice test as opposed to fill-in and short answers. I have weak short term memory, so that I need to write things down. My eye sight is injured in spots, that causes me problem on computer screens, (I read slower). Other than that Im cherry. Lol. Wondering what specialty I could pursue that does not require quick, high pressure decision making ability.
    I smiled when I read that you have short term memory. I feel that I have short term memory when I am under a lot of stress:wink2:! The wonderful thing about the nursing profession is that you can take your experiences and go to so many different places. I would try an insurance company that has rehabilitation ulitization reviews. Most of this work is completed over the phone or via fax. A lot of these jobs can also be done from home.
    Many Blessings to you in the future!
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    I have been a psychiatric nurse my entire career. Inpatient psychiatric nursing can be very stressful and often requires quick reaction and high-stakes judgments. Outpatient positions less so, but most outpatient positions require that you have previous experience (inpatient).

    Not trying to discourage you, but a surprising number of nurses in other areas have the impression that psych nursing is "easy" and "relaxed." Just wanted to nip that idea in the bud! Have you and your wife talked about how stressful and demanding (cognitively, emotionally, and physically) just getting through nursing school would be?

    You mentioned that you're taking many psychology courses -- have you considered continuing in that direction and pursuing licensure as a psychologist or LPC? Those people typically have more "relaxed" positions than anything I can think of in nursing; not that they're easier, but there's rarely a need to make an immediate, life-or-death decision, and more room/time for reflection. You would still be able to work with stroke clients and their families in those capacities.

    Another possibility (now that I'm thinking about it! ) would be occupational therapy (or occupational therapy assistant) -- they also work closely with stroke clients, among others, in a very direct, practical way, and play a vital role in their recovery. That's a role that requires a lot of patience and great "people skills," but is usually practiced in a fairly relaxed environment at a relaxed pace, with little need for quick, high-pressure decision-making.

    I'm not trying to necessarily discourage you from nursing, but would encourage you not to lock yourself into the idea of nursing too quickly just because that is your wife's field. There are many possibilities out there.

    Best wishes for your journey!
    Silverdragon102 likes this.
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    I could be mistaken (I'm a new nursing grad) Why not rehab nursing?

    You would most likely get to help stroke patients as well as others with head injury.

    Your patients would most likely be staying for longer, giving you fewer new patients to learn about daily.
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    Quote from SP79
    I could be mistaken (I'm a new nursing grad) Why not rehab nursing?

    You would most likely get to help stroke patients as well as others with head injury.

    Your patients would most likely be staying for longer, giving you fewer new patients to learn about daily.
    Rehap is a good choice. Some rehab units and facilities require an acute care experience of a year or two. But given the shortage, they may not still have that requirement.

    Woody
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    I had a tia many years ago and while I thought all was well I did come up with a short term memory deficit that I solved like you with notes. Hands, pants legs, little pieces of paper towels. I got better but I still write every thing down out of habit. I was thinking that rehab or medically or physically fragile children. What you set your mind to is what you will be most challenged by. I still have hugemongous holes in long term memory amazingly not about nursing though. Notes again, saved the day.
    Good luck.


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