Getting into nursing school with a mental illness? Is it going to be possible? Getting into nursing school with a mental illness? Is it going to be possible? - pg.3 | allnurses

Getting into nursing school with a mental illness? Is it going to be possible? - page 3

Hi There!. I registered for this board a while ago but haven't really posted quite yet. I am now at the point where I have a very important question and nursing school is a very big reality now.... Read More

  1. Visit  Katie828 profile page
    1
    "Antipsychotics" are used for many conditions besides psychosis...if that is what helps you, don't be afraid of the medication's classification.

    Don't give up!
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  2. Visit  VivaLasViejas profile page
    1
    Quote from Katie828
    "Antipsychotics" are used for many conditions besides psychosis...if that is what helps you, don't be afraid of the medication's classification.

    Don't give up!
    Yes, a lot of people get hung up on that term. I certainly did at first when my doctor prescribed one for me: "You're putting me on a WHAT??!!" But APs are a tool like any other in the toolbox of psychiatric medications, and sometimes it's the thing that makes a patient's other meds work better.
    allecait likes this.
  3. Visit  andchris88 profile page
    0
    Hello, I am curious what medication do you take for your OCD because I have OCD as well and continue to get intrusive thoughts that cause me so much anxiety and grief upon my soul... In addition, I'm also in nursing school as well and they are quite disturbing and interfering with my studies.
  4. Visit  VivaLasViejas profile page
    1
    Quote from andchris88
    Hello, I am curious what medication do you take for your OCD because I have OCD as well and continue to get intrusive thoughts that cause me so much anxiety and grief upon my soul... In addition, I'm also in nursing school as well and they are quite disturbing and interfering with my studies.
    Hello, and Welcome to Allnurses!

    I'm sorry you are in such distress. Please see your mental health provider as soon as possible, as he or she is the best person to advise you. You may need meds or a med adjustment to get you better relief.

    Wishing you well. ((((HUGS))))
    LadyFree28 likes this.
  5. Visit  BeOne77 profile page
    1
    Yes it is possible to go to nursing school with a mental illness, to graduate and get licensed however if your illness is reported either by you, someone who knows you, your doctor or anyone else who may have issue with this, or if you have prior hospitalizations, or if their is a complaint against you for any reason and this is revealed, you will be put into a monitoring program from anywhere from 2-5 years with reporting from your psychiatrist, therapist and be required to submit to random drug screens at your expense anywhere from 1-12 times per month, you will be required to send in monthly reports, sign your privacy consent away and also be required to pay for administrative fees every year to pay for participation in the program...Sorry chris you are having intrusive thoughts which sometimes be a result of a change in medication, withdrawal of one or a side effect of one. Blocking out thoughts or changing them is sometimes more beneficial than medication at times. It was put to me at one point that we get 60,000 thoughts a day and a way to assist with intrusive thoughts is to just watch them, notice them as if you are a bystander, and imagine that they are on a conveyer belt just dropping off the end...distraction is also helpful...it is common under the stress of nursing school to experience anxiety as to the nature of the stress involved, the expectations and the pressure related to exceed and pass...remember that intrusive thoughts are just that, harmless, bothersome, etc....we do have control over what we think about at times. Norman Vincent Peale said once "Change your thoughts- change your world"
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  6. Visit  VivaLasViejas profile page
    1
    I like the visual on the intrusive thoughts, BeOne77. I use a similar tactic, visualizing a huge STOP sign and concentrating on the letters for a minute or so, however long it takes to change focus. My thoughts race pretty much all the time, so it doesn't take long for the intrusive ones to go away.
    BeOne77 likes this.
  7. Visit  BeOne77 profile page
    0
    Yes there is reason to be afraid of a medications classification such as an antipsychotic.

    1) There are several physical problems as a result of taking any AP, such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, kidney disease, cardiac arrest, insomnia, eye issues, fibromyalgia, intrusive thoughts, anxiety, abnormal muscle movements, tardive dyskinesia, NMS, serotonin syndrome, CNS damage and depletion of GABA receptors and many other side effects too long to list but can be found on RXlist.com..

    2) There are reports, studies and clinical trials that report that people who take AP's have more incidences of rehospitalization and more relapses than those treated with placebos..Incidences of psychosis are more common once on a AP and also there is a risk of psychosis in a withdrawal period. Not to mention long term disability

    3) No there are not many conditions AP's are used for except for psychosis and sleep (Seroquel)

    4) There is agreement now between many prominent psychiatrists that AP's should be used short term and that long term use can cause permanent disability.

    5) Resulting Stigma, discrimination among others in society as well as medical discrimination and inability to receive life insurance.
  8. Visit  suanna profile page
    3
    If you don't have a mental illness before you get into nursing school, you most certainly will before you get out- it's mandatory. At to OCD-if that was a handicap in nursing, half the nurses I work with would be out of a job.

    Seriously, I would be careful with the career path you described. Nursing, and nursing education are enormously stressful. Be aware that although your mental health issues may be in good control now-all the wheels may fall off your wagon when you start going through the gauntlet. If this is truely something you want- go ahead and try, but be sure to promise yourself if you find the pressure is compromising your health, you will put your own wellbeing first, even if it means giving up the goal of being a nurse. As to disclosure when applying to nursing school, as they said in Harry Potter "even in the wizarding world, hearing voices no one else can hear isn't a good sign" Not your problem, but the point being: Keep as much of your health history to yourself as you can without lying. This is a good rule everywhere, not just when applying to nursing school.
  9. Visit  NurseStelri profile page
    0
    Yes you can. I went through nursing school with two different people with mental illnesses (Bipolar & anxiety disorder). I would recommend you go through a 4 year program and take advantage of all your resources (tutors, advisors, etc). The best thing about nursing instructors is that they understand mental illnesses and are usually very willing to work with you.
    I say go through a 4 year program because I completed a MEPN program and it was so intense that these students I went to school with are still attempting to finish because it took a high emotional toll on them because of how intense the program was-- to clarify I personally believe MEPN programs take an emotional toll on anyone going through them. Also no matter what program you choose or where you go please make sure you have a strong support system Important for every nursing student!

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