Getting into nursing school with a mental illness? Is it going to be possible? - page 3

by lntm2925

Hi There!. I registered for this board a while ago but haven't really posted quite yet. I am now at the point where I have a very important question and nursing school is a very big reality now. Here's my question :) Ever... Read More


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    Sadala, mine was the opposite. I was on Depakote for epilepsy (but some how someone started using it as a psych medication, even though it was given for epilepsy) and then, my former psychiatrist took me off of it. He said I didn't need it. So, I am on zero medication. I go to a therapist once a month.
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    So happy to see this thread. I've been terrified of the mental illness/getting into school issue. I don't feel any special need to disclose it, but it's there in my medical records. When those records go to university health services, they'll see i've been on psych meds since 2005. They might not see the whole crazy laundry list of dxs (or is it the laundry list of crazy dxs?), but they'll see the latest version (at the moment, bipolar II, OCPD, and schizotypal PD).

    I'm not worried about being able to hack the schooling or life in a hospital. I'm used to doing hard physical labor at weird hours, i'm used to working and taking classes at the same time, i'm used to giving myself the self-care i require. I suspect things might even be a little easier once i get work which is both physically and intellectually demanding enough to keep me from jumping out of my own skin, AND which pays me enough that i don't need to choose between buying health insurance or health care for said skin.

    What i'm worried about is being _allowed to try_. I feel a little more confident now. Thanks, all.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Quote from wayward_pitbulls
    So happy to see this thread. I've been terrified of the mental illness/getting into school issue. I don't feel any special need to disclose it, but it's there in my medical records. When those records go to university health services, they'll see i've been on psych meds since 2005. They might not see the whole crazy laundry list of dxs (or is it the laundry list of crazy dxs?), but they'll see the latest version (at the moment, bipolar II, OCPD, and schizotypal PD).

    I'm not worried about being able to hack the schooling or life in a hospital. I'm used to doing hard physical labor at weird hours, i'm used to working and taking classes at the same time, i'm used to giving myself the self-care i require. I suspect things might even be a little easier once i get work which is both physically and intellectually demanding enough to keep me from jumping out of my own skin, AND which pays me enough that i don't need to choose between buying health insurance or health care for said skin.

    What i'm worried about is being _allowed to try_. I feel a little more confident now. Thanks, all.
    I'm glad you feel better about all this. There's no doubt that having a mental illness makes everything harder, but it CAN be done, and indeed is being done by countless nurses and students all around the globe......successfully, too!

    Hang in there, take your meds as prescribed, see your mental health professional regularly, and know that you can do this.
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    Quote from wish_me_luck
    Sadala, mine was the opposite. I was on Depakote for epilepsy (but some how someone started using it as a psych medication, even though it was given for epilepsy) and then, my former psychiatrist took me off of it. He said I didn't need it. So, I am on zero medication. I go to a therapist once a month.
    I'm confused. Why didn't the doctor who was following your epilepsy keep you on the medication if that was the case? I wouldn't let one physician dc a med another physician was giving me just because he/she felt like doing so. I pay the doctor, not vice versa.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Quote from wayward_pitbulls
    So happy to see this thread. I've been terrified of the mental illness/getting into school issue. I don't feel any special need to disclose it, but it's there in my medical records. When those records go to university health services, they'll see i've been on psych meds since 2005. They might not see the whole crazy laundry list of dxs (or is it the laundry list of crazy dxs?), but they'll see the latest version (at the moment, bipolar II, OCPD, and schizotypal PD).
    Your school requires seven years of medical history? That's a little extreme... My school required a physical that said I was healthy enough to attend. Period.

    Also, I turned in one month of pharmacy records when I did my drug screening.

    Again, why volunteer all of this additional information?
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    PCP had no idea that psychiatrist said I didn't need it. For a long time, I still took the medication; but, after psychiatrists consistently/constantly telling me I don't need it--I stopped. I don't think it was right or the psychiatrist's place to determine the need for medication/lack of medication for epilepsy, especially without neurological assessment--rather dangerous, in my opinion. No tapering either, just told to stop--I don't know how to slowly taper someone off of medication, that's the physician's job that wasn't done. But, it is what it is and that's what happened. NP wasn't too pleased when I went for a visit recently and said that when I stopped taking the medication, I should have made an appointment then also.

    I think psychiatry providers often forget that patients with mental health conditions still have bodies; therefore, can still have physical health conditions in addition to psychiatric illness.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    "Antipsychotics" are used for many conditions besides psychosis...if that is what helps you, don't be afraid of the medication's classification.

    Don't give up!
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Quote from Katie828
    "Antipsychotics" are used for many conditions besides psychosis...if that is what helps you, don't be afraid of the medication's classification.

    Don't give up!
    Yes, a lot of people get hung up on that term. I certainly did at first when my doctor prescribed one for me: "You're putting me on a WHAT??!!" But APs are a tool like any other in the toolbox of psychiatric medications, and sometimes it's the thing that makes a patient's other meds work better.
    allecait likes this.


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