Confused/Upset New Grad Nurse

  1. 0
    I was unsure if this was the right place to post this but... here I go.
    As stated in the title I'm a newly graduated nurse in south florida, I worked my butt off in school and received a scholarship to a great hospital system which granted employment after finishing school. I managed to obtain my dream job in an IMCU/CCU and thought my life was going to finally settle into place and then employee health stepped in. During my 2-day initial orientation I was called out to the health building due to results of a failed ishihara test (color deficiency), something I had no idea I had and had and something that never effected my ability to read tests (dipsticks, ketones, occult blood) or provide a perfect assessment, which is what I informed the ARNP after she told me. " No, we are sorry, but I can't clear you for work on that unit with this condition". I pleaded with her to test my vision on tests or skin colors, whatever it was that they didn't think I could preform but they just said all they went by was the ishihara test.
    I just feel so defeated after working so hard and completing every task thrown at me to be denied over something I know isn't a problem, and I feel like a huge failure. I just wanted to know if anyone has ever heard of it being a problem and if there is anything I can do because I don't want to give up my dreams of nursing in a critical care unit.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this I know it was a long one :/
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Keep trying, all I can say is not every hospital system or employers does that test. My last facility did not and yes it was for SICU.
  5. 0
    Yeah, I'm definitely not going to give up so yet, it's just discouraging for someone to tell you that you aren't fit to work after you've met every standard and been licensed. Thanks for the encouragement though
  6. 1
    If that is this hospital's policy, there may not be anything you can do but, if it were me, I'd go to an Ophthalmologist and have my vision formally evaluated so I'd know what I'm dealing with. I've never had this test given to me by an employer so I agree to keep trying.
    Esme12 likes this.
  7. 0
    From what I hear from nurses I know who have been in this hospital system a while they've never heard of someone being turned down for it, they have even said that it's absurd. Maybe I'll get lucky, I basically have to wait til Monday for employee health to talk to the supervisors on my potential unit. Hopefully it won't be a new policy they are instituting.
  8. 0
    Quote from lZazz
    I was unsure if this was the right place to post this but... here I go.
    As stated in the title I'm a newly graduated nurse in south florida, I worked my butt off in school and received a scholarship to a great hospital system which granted employment after finishing school. I managed to obtain my dream job in an IMCU/CCU and thought my life was going to finally settle into place and then employee health stepped in. During my 2-day initial orientation I was called out to the health building due to results of a failed ishihara test (color deficiency), something I had no idea I had and had and something that never effected my ability to read tests (dipsticks, ketones, occult blood) or provide a perfect assessment, which is what I informed the ARNP after she told me. " No, we are sorry, but I can't clear you for work on that unit with this condition". I pleaded with her to test my vision on tests or skin colors, whatever it was that they didn't think I could preform but they just said all they went by was the ishihara test.
    I just feel so defeated after working so hard and completing every task thrown at me to be denied over something I know isn't a problem, and I feel like a huge failure. I just wanted to know if anyone has ever heard of it being a problem and if there is anything I can do because I don't want to give up my dreams of nursing in a critical care unit.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this I know it was a long one :/



    I sent you a pm. Are you still able to work on another floor?
  9. 0
    Quote from lZazz
    From what I hear from nurses I know who have been in this hospital system a while they've never heard of someone being turned down for it, they have even said that it's absurd. Maybe I'll get lucky, I basically have to wait til Monday for employee health to talk to the supervisors on my potential unit. Hopefully it won't be a new policy they are instituting.

    Good luck with everything!!
    Last edit by cookiemonsterpower on Jul 21, '13
  10. 0
    Eh, I've only had it done with the fire department. At my doctor's office, to be cleared, they showed me the blood tubes and asked what color the tops were and maybe pointed at one other random object in the room. I would also have asked her to have a 2nd person evaluate me to make sure that there wasn't a mistake the first time around or they did not document wrong.
  11. 0
    Yeah they did it 3 times, I just can't pass the ishihara test but nothing else I've ever noticed or performed wrong. I've done clinicals in the ER and ICU and seen all the blood tubes and labs and such. I'm hoping the nurse manager that hired me will change her mind if she sees that.
  12. 0
    If they are not careful with the cards and you are borderline red/green color blind (you actually see a different shade) I would ask if you can have an independent ophthalmologist/optometrist evaluation to solidify your "disability".....at your expense. k to see the personnel policy that states color blindness excludes you from these areas....however if they include color testing a part of the physical and the passing the physical is a part of your "contingent offer".

    I have had facilities test with the ishihara test Ishihara's Test For Colour Deficiency - 24 Plates Edition - YouTube and those that don't. I have worked with nurses who are color blind. If this facility won't allow color deficiencies for this position seek another one until you can get a job that doesn't test for them....you can ask for a reasonable accommodation once established that you do have a visual impairment by an independent practitioner.

    Subtleties in color can be important but they are not career changing.


Top