Can nurses with a new mental disability take nclex and work?

  1. I only want to work part time/ per diem and slowly integrate myself into the hospital setting. I am suffering from acute stress trauma - a sub-category similar to PTSD. i function great I'm just suffering the whole time because I'm scared my disability will affect my work. The anxiety and adrenaline help make me put out great work it's just exhausting mentally.


    Can I get your input?
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   adventure_rn
    I'm not sure that working part-time or per diem to start will be possible, or that it would be the best course of action.

    When you first start working as a nurse, there is a very steep learning curve. It takes time (usually a couple of years full time) to feel confident and competent. It is very difficult to feel proficient at both skills and time management/workflow when you don't work very frequently. For instance, learning to start IVs is stressful. If you do it a couple of times a week, you quickly become more confident. If you only do it once every few months, it becomes even more stressful. Most people don't recommend going part-time or per diem until you have at least a year of full-time under your belt, and even then you may feel that you're 'losing your skills' if you don't work very often.

    In addition, you may have a hard time finding a hospital that will train you as a new grad to work part-time or per diem (although it is possible, depending on the needs of the unit). They will most likely expect you to work full-time during your orientation for the reasons I stated above (it's hard to become proficient when you don't do something very often).

    Perhaps you could look into quasi-acute care settings--lower acuity than a hospital, but higher than an outpatient office triage job. I'm not terribly familiar with these settings, but maybe an outpatient dialysis or outpatient surgery center would be a good compromise? Have you run your concerns by your therapist? They may also have some ideas.

    Best of luck!
  4. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from adventure_rn
    I'm not sure that working part-time or per diem to start will be possible, or that it would be the best course of action.

    When you first start working as a nurse, there is a very steep learning curve. It takes time (usually a couple of years full time) to feel confident and competent. It is very difficult to feel proficient at both skills and time management/workflow when you don't work very frequently. For instance, learning to start IVs is stressful. If you do it a couple of times a week, you quickly become more confident. If you only do it once every few months, it becomes even more stressful. Most people don't recommend going part-time or per diem until you have at least a year of full-time under your belt, and even then you may feel that you're 'losing your skills' if you don't work very often.

    In addition, you may have a hard time finding a hospital that will train you as a new grad to work part-time or per diem (although it is possible, depending on the needs of the unit). They will most likely expect you to work full-time during your orientation for the reasons I stated above (it's hard to become proficient when you don't do something very often).

    Perhaps you could look into quasi-acute care settings--lower acuity than a hospital, but higher than an outpatient office triage job. I'm not terribly familiar with these settings, but maybe an outpatient dialysis or outpatient surgery center would be a good compromise? Have you run your concerns by your therapist? They may also have some ideas.

    Best of luck!
    Well said. There are many nurses who are able to work with a mental health diagnosis such as PTSD, Generalized anxiety, Major Depression even Bi-Polar and Schizoaffective. The trick is to get your own mental health house in order before jumping in. Speak to you mental health provider psychiatrist/psychologist to explore the advisability of going to school/work and heed what they have to say.

    I have worked for 17 years with PTSD, Major depression and anxiety DO . I take care of myself eat right and am compliant with medications. It has not stopped me from practicing nursing.

    Best of luck to you

    Hppy

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